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Recommendation for Ethernet-Wireless adapter?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by bobnielsen, Mar 31, 2007.

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  1. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    What would be the choice for integrating the HR20's ethernet connection into a 802.11g network? I don't want to run a CAT-5 cable through the wall to my Netgear router.
     
  2. Milominderbinder2

    Milominderbinder2 Cutting Edge: ECHELON '08

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  3. cal87

    cal87 AllStar

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    I use the Buffalo Ethernet Converter. It has 4 connections. Good for me because I have the HR20, PS3 and HD DVD all hooked up wirelessly.
     
  4. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    Thanks. I ordered that one also. The price wasn't much different than some of the others ($71.99 at Best Buy), but the 4 ports is a plus. I'm surprised that the adapters are almost twice as expensive as routers.
     
  5. Phil T

    Phil T Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Littleton,...
    Has anyone tried an Apple Airport Express?
     
  6. Just J

    Just J Crivens!

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    Do you have a wireless router currently installed? If so, you want to be sure to get a compatible bridge, espcially if you're taking advantage of any proprietary speed boosting technologies.

    Be sure that your bridge supports the encryption protocol you want to use. I had to return the LinkSys bridge I bought because it wouldn't support WPA (and I couldn't find the V3 version that's on their web site, which is supposed to be WPA compatible).

    I'm running the D-Link DI624 wireless router (and 4 port switch) and the D-Link DWL-G820 bridges, configured for "WPA-TKIP", MAC address filtering, and "Dynamic Turbo" speed boosting technology. It's working quite well for me.
     
  7. ChrisMinCT

    ChrisMinCT Legend

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    Food for thought - I had the opportunity to test a lot of wireless bridges and wireless adapters at my last job for the specific purpose of moving MPG2 data in 2mbps streams. None of them, including the best Cisco and 3Com had to offer, were reliable enough that we felt we could offer a wireless product. We tested both 802.11a and 802.11g.

    So whereas any wireless bridge will handle the data side of this and will probably suit the purpose of music, if you are going to jump on the VOD offering in the near future, you might have ongoing problems with wireless.

    So you might want to reconsider running that CAT5 in preparation for VOD...
     
  8. mikeny

    mikeny Hall Of Fame

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    I know how choppy my DV video from my camcorder was when I tried to play it wirelessly. That was with 802.11g 54 Mbps. DivX usually plays well enough though..even a homemade DVD with a bitrate of about 5000 Kb/sec was OK IIRC wirelessly. I don't know the bitrate with DV but HD is supposed to be in teens right? I can't see it working with a/g networks.
     
  9. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    Is VOD sending the video via the internet? Or just the upstream request?
     
  10. mikeny

    mikeny Hall Of Fame

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    That's a good question. So in other words, maybe you'll just need broadband to 'order' and maybe you'll download through the dish making all this wifi bandwidth discussion moot.
     
  11. cygnusloop

    cygnusloop Hall Of Fame

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    The VOD will, I think, stream to the disk, right? I don't think it is necesarily designed to be watched in "real time". Why would the greater bitrate of the hard line be any better, except for the fact that the download might complete quicker? Or am I missing the point? :scratchin

    EDIT: This article does state that they intend to deliver the content in real time. But isn't my BB connection the bottleneck? Not my wireless 802.11G.
    http://www.multichannel.com/article/CA6429842.html
     
  12. mikeny

    mikeny Hall Of Fame

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    By the way, sorry for getting OT with regards to the OP's question...

    How do you guys interpret these sections from the article with regards to this issue?:

    "Now, the largest satellite operator will try to match that. DirecTV executive vice president for entertainment Eric Shanks said the satellite giant has the technological capacity to download video via a broadband connection at speeds that will allow consumers to watch the content in real time. "

    and

    "DirecTV subscribers with the company’s high-definition DVR receiver and a high-speed modem connection will be able to access more than 2,000 on-demand movies — many of which will be in high-definition — as well as the cable-network content. Shanks said DirecTV will begin beta-testing the service in April and expects to roll it out to customers in July.

    “It depends on your connection,” Shanks said. “A lot of times the content will download faster than real time. There’s nothing technically on our side that limits the consumer’s ability to watch it in real time.”
     
  13. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    That's what I figured. My DSL is 1.5 Mb/s, while my wireless is 54 Mb/s. I wont get real-time in any case (even with MPEG4 and bit-starving). I suppose if FIOS were available that might be a factor, but there are other options for VOD with FIOS.
     
  14. ChrisMinCT

    ChrisMinCT Legend

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    Could they even do that? They are already pushing the envelope on the number of channels they can send via the SAT. Could they downstream tens of thousands of VOD streams concurrently too? I'd be really impressed if they could do that.
     
  15. ChrisMinCT

    ChrisMinCT Legend

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    Its not the stream rates that cause the problems with wireless. Its the dropped / lost packets that occurs with wireless. With data, its not an issue because the wifi card can just ask for a resend of the missing packets. But with a real time stream, it can't do that. And even if they cache it, the stream is still coming hard and fast continuously so it frequently still can't spare the processing or bandwidth to fill the gaps. Hence, choppy video.

    Defining VOD as real time is misleading too. Real time is streaming it as it happens with subsecond delays between capturing the video, encoding it and sending it. These are videos on disk. Even our live TV signals on the HR20 are running somewhere between 9 and 27 seconds behind real time. Yes, indeed - I read that those of us who watched the TimeSqaure ball drop via our D* HD DVRs were 16 seconds late to the party this year!!
     
  16. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    If it just downloads the data to the HD in the HR-20 for future viewing, then wireless should be fine. I agree, however, that "real time" video contect would be an issue.
     
  17. ChrisMinCT

    ChrisMinCT Legend

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    I'm going to be REALLY interested to see how D* can pull off delivering VOD over BB Internet connections. Many have tried and failed.

    Scenario: The wife is chatting away on the Vonage line. The teen is playing Battlefield 2142 on the PC. And I'm watching Star Wars in HD VOD. All over my 6mbps DSL connection. Never mind the stream rates. Just start counting up the packets that my poor little Motorola router is going to have to be processing per second. The thing is going to start glowing like a nuclear reactor. Is D* going to be using QoS for this? The Vonage connection is using top priority QoS. The teen is at the bottom of the priority queue on the PC. But where will the VOD stream fall? Somebody is going to be an unhappy camper.

    What's also tickling my fancy is that the best home based BB connection for all this is a cable modem. A cable modem. Cable. D*'s mortal enemy. :eek2:
     
  18. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    Right. That's why I think real time is (or should be) out of the question. Let the content download when the bandwidth is available, and watched at a later time.
     
  19. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Actually, 6mps should not be very taxing for a router, even a SOHO router. All the switching functions are in hardware and the "routing" functions are limited to let in (and change IP) or don't let in. Its an edge router not a network, mesh router with lots of routing decisions to make.

    So long as your upstream can really, consistently feed at 2mbs or more, I'm thinking your should be able to handle VOD without any trouble at all.

    That said, I've not seen any real stats on what speed you really need for SD VOD or for HD VOD. That will be interesting.

    Cheers,
    Tom

     
  20. Tom Robertson

    Tom Robertson Lifetime Achiever DBSTalk Club

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    Directv will be supporting both modes, real-time and delayed. And I think delayed will have a couple variations: nearly immediate and something akin to overnight.

    Cheers,
    Tom
     
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