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Recording shows?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by GraphicFunn, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. GraphicFunn

    GraphicFunn New Member

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    Dec 27, 2008
    I work evenings so usually record movies & shows to watch them later. I have a Philips DVR which also has a DVD recorder so you can dub what is on its hard drive. Its rather like an old VHS recorder. I'm upgrading my DVT to HD which I read here that there is no coax connection on the HD receivers. I can't find manuals on the receivers because they will not say what ones I might get. Anyway, I would like to know if there is a composite connection and if it will still allow me to record and then dub the shows to DVR for later. Is it only the HDMI cable that has this copy protection and is it for all shows? Everything is coax now and I have no problems but I do not want to upgrade to HD if I will lose this ability. I have read something about HDMI preventing copying shows but I do not understand the extent of this restriction. I just want to watch them later. Can someone tell me about this and if my recordings should work? Will the restriction affect if I get an HD DVR receiver? Thx
     
  2. carl6

    carl6 Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    Most (but not all) of the HD receivers and DVRs do have a composite video output, however it is going to be cumbersome at best for you to use it unless you set the unit to an SD resolution (480i or 480p). If you want to record via the composite output at the same time you want to watch via component or hdmi outputs, then you'll run into problems.

    One solution is to use a component video to composite video converter (about $50).

    As to recording and watching later, just get a DirecTV DVR. You can record a couple of hundred hours of HD shows and watch them when you want. This isn't a solution for archiving, but for normal time-shifting it is great and much preferred over using an SD recorder.
     
  3. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    Texas City, TX
    Correct. There are no HD DVRs with the coax connection out.
    They all have the Composite connections, red white and yellow for the SD output.
    When you try to save a show to a DVD using the composite output, the System switches your TV to the SD definition at that time also. The program will be saved in the SD format, the same format you are using now.
    The program has to be played and saved to the DVD at the same time.

    link to manuals :
    http://support.directv.com/app/answ...sion/L3RpbWUvMTMyOTg4MDk4Ny9zaWQvWEpTRHdpUms=
     
  4. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Dec 9, 2006
    You will be able to connect with composite/S-video.
    A problem you may have is:
    You will need to change the resolution to 480 to record a show without an annoying message saying you're not using HD, if you're playing an HD recording.
    Some simply use a component to composite adapter to not have to change resolution.
     
  5. GraphicFunn

    GraphicFunn New Member

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    Dec 27, 2008
    Thanks everyone. I sounds like you are telling me that as long as I use SD for the recoding it will be fine and that is not a problem since I only have one TV with an HDMI connector anyway. This was just a plan for a future TV I want to get.

    Looking at the receiver manual information I am confused on how to connect the outside TV antenna to the receiver. There is a coax ant in connector on the receiver now but I don't see one on the picture of the new box. Since we only get local news via antenna it would be nice to connect that.

    I am really torn about bothering with HD if there are all these differences including that you can only hook one TV to each box.

    I know I can hook it up through a VCR to get other TVs hooked up but VCRs are getting harder to get all the time and the new DVD players do not have coax connectors either. I am surprised that DTV still uses coax from the dish to the receiver then makes us use other types of wiring.

    I like the idea of having an addition DVR but it seems the SD version might actually work better if I can only record some HD shows anf not the prem channel movies. Are there really any advantages to going with HD other than picture quality? The HD channels seem to offer the same programs, correct?
    thx
     
  6. jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    Texas City, TX
    The sound is better if you are using a surround sound system since the HD programs ( most of them ) have Dolby Digital 5.1.
    There are some channels that are in HD only that you could get that you do not now.
    You can hook up the HD DVRs to the internet and download some free movies / programming.
     
  7. sdirv

    sdirv Icon

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    Dec 14, 2008
    I use the s-video port and don't bother to change resolution...the annoying message goes away before I hit the record button on my DVD recorder.
     
  8. carl6

    carl6 Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Seattle, WA
    SD receivers typically have an antenna in connector, but it is just a pass through so when the receiver is off the antenna signal goes to the TV (assuming the TV is connected to the receiver by coax and not by composite video or s-video). The SD receivers do not have ota tuners in them.

    HD receivers do not have this, because they don't provide a modulated rf output. You can get an external add-on ota tuner (the AM21) for HD receivers and DVRs if that is important to you. Or, you can just run your antenna directly to your TV.
     

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