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Repositioning a rooftop dish - what are my options?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by briansyme, May 19, 2011.

  1. briansyme

    briansyme New Member

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    Sep 20, 2005
    I've just had to send a DirecTV service guy away because he couldn't go onto my roof to realign my dish (OSHA regulations that are either new or were being ignored at the time of the install). The only option he offered was to wall mount a new dish, but that's unlikely to work out - the only wall accessible by ladder has the line of sight obscured by trees that we can't do anything about.

    So what can I do to make the roof mounted dish safe to work on? (The OSHA regulations speak of "fall protection" but I'm not really sure what this means in this context.)
     
  2. hilmar2k

    hilmar2k Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 18, 2007
    You could try contacting a local satellite installer.
     
  3. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    What crap!

    When Directv was using only contractors for installations they couldn't spell OSHA; didn't need to know what it was. They are just backing away from the workers compensation insurance costs they have expected their serfs to eat.

    Fall protection has been kicked around by the roofer's industry. It ended up, last time I heard, that it was more dangerous to set up and remove fall protection from a roof than to just decide what was walkable and what was not.

    And you can throw a rope over the house to the mail slot in the door...tie a wrench to the rope inside the door and you can climb the back half the roof,,,it goes like that.

    The guy didn;t want to do your installation or his company has only been around for about a week. Keep looking. It can be done...probably not included in the FREE installation. Forty foot ladder charges start at $100.00 and require a second worker.

    Joe
     
  4. briansyme

    briansyme New Member

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    Sep 20, 2005
    I guess I'll start asking the local installers for advice. What really ticks me off about this is that the DirecTV CSR made no attempt to find out where the dish was installed up front. I'm not blaming the CSR specifically, it just seems like it would be in everyone's interest for the service call to include some information about the type of site. Oh well.
     
  5. Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

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    Mar 18, 2008
    They have to be able to reach your dish from the ladder. The tallest ladder they will use is 40'. If those 2 things can be done then just call and get it rescheduled. Tell them it will require a 40' ladder, and expect it to be rescheduled once.

    If it cannot then you need to look into getting it moved or higher someone locally.
     
  6. briansyme

    briansyme New Member

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    Sep 20, 2005
    Unfortunately it's a split level roof, and the dish can't be reached without going onto the lower roof level. I think I'm probably going to get a local roofing company to remove the dish then get DTV back to reinstall on the opposite side of the house using the 40' ladder technique you mention. I'm sure this will be a month long shambles to resolve...
     
  7. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    One consequence of DirecTV taking the installation business in-house is that they pay close attention to liabily and OSHA rules. DirecTV had several installer deaths two years ago, and many injuries, and in those investigations, OSHA rules were not being followed, exposing DirecTV to big lawsuits.

    Both Dish and DirecTV now have most of their installs being done by actual employees rather than contractors, and those employees have strict rules they are required to follow. One of those is that the tech may not get off the ladder and onto the roof without fall protection (and in most cases, there won't be appropiate anchor points available), and can use a 28' ladder max, without having 2 techs and a supervisor onsite. This means that 40' ladder jobs are usually rescheduled several times until a team can be coordinated, as 40' ladders are few, and are heavy and expensive to keep on a vehicle, so they are only deployed when specifically needed.
     
  8. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    If there is a dish there somebody was able to walk to it.

    Guide yourself. The installation does need to be accessible or you will eat a ladder charge every time something needs fixing. I have jobs that are still untouched after ten years,,,,,,,but the Ka/Ku dishes are bigger and more prone to wind problems.

    Any chance a pole on the ground will work?

    Joe
     
  9. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    Of course. BUT, DirecTV is expected to be able to service all installs in virtually any weather.

    Many roofs can be navigated in the dry season, but are completely inaccessable in wet or snowy weather. But customers expect their systems to be fixed immediately if something happens. The only way to assure that is to enforce the rule that dishes can be reached from the ladder.
     
  10. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    BZ,

    As you correctly point point out Directv is doing this stuff in-house. Still the customer has an unrealistic expectation that they will be perfectly happy all the time. The ice on the roof is the perfect example. At what cost do we have constant TV?

    I have had demands for second opinions on NLOS. Folks insist on installations after dark, in snow, during thunder storms. And you tell them "NO!"

    But Directv is relearning what techs crawled through years ago.

    Should be fun to watch, as you know.

    Joe
     

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