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Required cable

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by waters212, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. waters212

    waters212 Mentor

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    Feb 18, 2007
    I have come across a roll of sat cable and want to make sure it is appropriate for a DTV install. Printed on the cable is the following:

    EN 50117-2-1 18 RG6 Class A Trilogy Comm. USA Inc. 18 AWG -- CM c(ETL)us -- CATV (ETL)us & CL2

    Is this cable okay to be used to add an additional room etc.?
     
  2. netraa

    netraa Godfather

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    Mar 27, 2007
    It would appear that the specs on that cable do not line up with the current Directv requirements. (solid copper core, 60% braid, swept to 3ghz)

    However, that does not mean it will not work.
     
  3. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    While Commscope spec'ed that cable for "Cable", it should work fine for sat unless it's a very long run.
     
  4. KsBillsFan

    KsBillsFan AllStar

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    Oct 16, 2009
    The cable they use in Satellite and in Cable TV is the same. Cable companies use what the satellite guys install and vice versa.
     
  5. captain_video

    captain_video Icon

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    Nov 21, 2005
    That's not entirely true. There are different types of RG6 required for different services. Most digital cable and basic sat installations can get away with using copperclad steel core RG6, which is inexpensive and available at most home improvement outlets like Home Depot or Lowes. The slimline dishes used with DirecTV require solid copper core RG6 due to the sensitive nature of the LNBs. Copperclad steel RG6 can cause too much of a voltage drop when used in this setup, resulting in switching errors at the LNB. This is especially true if you have long cable runs. For short runs (i.e. <50 ft), you can probably get away with the copperclad steel RG6. For longer runs, bite the bullet and get the solid copper core. Be aware that solid copper core RG6 can be very expensive. There are good deals that can be found if you shop around.
     
  6. awblackmon

    awblackmon Legend

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    May 20, 2009
    In our area we can't hook up to copper clad steel. When we roll up to a house that was pre-wired with it, we have to test the cable with a magnet to see if it is steel. It usually is.:nono2: We then have to run a new line. Of course now the customer is upset at us for decorating their house with new wire when they thought the pre wire stuff could be used.

    Well, enough of these upset people called the contractor and began complaining about the cable that was put in during the pre wire. Many of the contractors are now putting in the !00% copper. Over time I should be decorating homes less and less with new wire.:)
     
  7. Ronder

    Ronder AllStar

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    Jul 9, 2007
    R56 is working great here. We waved the r6 install on all but the new HD tv. I am in an apartment in the basement and am happy to have direct, just like at my home!:sure:
     
  8. KsBillsFan

    KsBillsFan AllStar

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    Oct 16, 2009
    Strange. I just spent 6 years in the CableTV industry and never did I see a Dish installer add lines if the customer already had one running to the TV. And all my company used was copper clad wire.

    If I was a customer and already had coax installed and was told I would need to have all new lines ran on my house, I wouldn't let you do it. I could't believe how many people will build a $300K house and not plan for where they wanted TV's.
     
  9. captain_video

    captain_video Icon

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    Nov 21, 2005
    I assume you are referring to RG56 and RG6 since there is no R56 or R6 cable used in the TV industry that I'm aware of. If you're using RG56 then you have the wrong type of cable for TV reception. It's designed for ham radios and such and has an impedance of 50-ohms vs. 75-ohms for RG59 and RG6.

    And what does that say about the installer?:rolleyes: You just reinforced my rationale for installing my own cable and satellite systems.

    If you only had RG59 and refused to have it upgraded to RG6 then you get what you deserve. $300K will just about buy you a starter townhome in this part of the country. Most people don't think about where they want TVs while having a house built. Besiders, things change after you've moved into a new home. I pre-wired my house over 25 years ago while it was being built and I have rewired it several times since then.

    DBS satellite TV and home networking weren't even something I had to concern myself with at the time so all I did was run RG59 for cable TV and some extra phone lines. I have since rewired it with steel clad RG6, added secondary lines for DVRs in each room, added CAT5 cables for a home network, upgraded to CAT6 for a gigabit network, and upgraded to solid copper RG6 for the latest DirecTV satellites (but ended up switching to FIOS).
     
  10. KsBillsFan

    KsBillsFan AllStar

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    Oct 16, 2009

    300K in this area is a nice house, since cost of living is pretty low in South Central Kansas.

    If you build a new house and the contractor uses RG59, I'd kick him right in the nuts.

    And you are right, after 25 years in the house, things go old and technology changes. So you would expect to re-wire. But on a new house, the things should be good for plenty of years.
     
  11. evan_s

    evan_s Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 3, 2008
    Copper clad is fine and in spec for dish installs. They don't use voltage switching as part of their signaling for any recent receivers like DirecTV does still for anything non SWM.
     
  12. AZsatTech

    AZsatTech Cool Member

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    Oct 13, 2009
    The only approved cable for DirecTV is Perfectvision solid copper center conductor, 60% braid, 3Ghz swept tested.

    Regardless of what brand you buy, make sure it meets the above requirements, and you will be fine. Also make sure you only use approved/quality connectors and F81 barrels.
     
  13. bb37

    bb37 Godfather

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    Dec 27, 2007
    I'm not familiar with an RG56 coaxial cable. There is an RG58 which is a 50-ohm cable typically with 0.195" outside diameter that is used in the two-way radio business.
     
  14. bb37

    bb37 Godfather

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    Dec 27, 2007
    Wish that was happening around here. When I found out my new house was going to be pre-wired with copper clad, I complained to the builder who went back to his low-voltage sub-contractor who reported that copper clad was just fine for satellite installations. When I objected, I was basically told to pound sand.

    I'm in the process of replacing the copper clad with the PerfectVision solid copper cable that DirecTV specifies. Luckily, I have a one-story house with a full, unfinished basement so access is not too bad.
     

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