1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Running coax and ground wire from antenna

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by IDRick, Aug 15, 2009.

  1. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Hello experts!

    I need some advice from you! :) Switching to D* is contingent on finishing an antenna install. I've done a lot of testing to find the optimal location and OTA antenna for my location and am just about ready to do the install. My home is a single story ranch style and the antenna will be mounted at the north end of the home (roof mount, not gable mount). My home has vinyl siding and metal covers on the soffits.

    Can you recommend a procedure for running the rg-6 four feet to the eaves and down to the bottom of the siding? I've never done this before so don't know what to buy and how to do it. Do you recommend using these: http://www.prosatellitesupply.com/vinyl_siding_clips_vertical.htm I am trying to minimize length of cable run (total will be over 150 ft) otherwise I could run it over to the corner of roof, down under the corner cover, and then over horizontally with the horizontal clips to the planned entry point.

    What should I use to mount the grounding block to the vinyl siding?

    Anyone have any pictures that illustrate a correct drip loop and how to install the siding clips?

    Thanks!

    Rick
     
  2. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    IMO, siding clips are nearly worthless. They're hard to use, the cable sticks far out from the wall, and the sun will destroy the clips in a year or two leaving your cable hanging loose.

    We use screw-in cable clips exclusively. Yes, it puts tiny holes in the siding, but the cable stays put and we've never had a complaint.

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  3. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

    3,071
    0
    Feb 28, 2007
    1. Forget the plastic clips.
    2. Locate the DTV dish as close to above the electric meter. Try for a truss end where there is much wood to lag bolt to.
    3.Do not attach the cable to the roof.
    4. Run the cable down the corner fitting in the vinyl siding. Sometimes you can run it directly down the inside corner; sometimes you can push the cable into a vertical edge of the corner fitting.
    5. Likewise you can often tuck horizontal cable into the edge of siding. The zip tool is for siding installers but know that it is possible to run cable inside siding...don't need no freakin clips.

    Joe
     
  4. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Joe,

    Thanks for your reply! You make good points for a DTV install but I have to complete my OTA antenna install first. I can save significant cable run (~35ft) by dropping the cable straight down the gable end versus running to the lower end of roof, down corner piece and then over to the middle where enters home. I have strong signals in my area and cannot use a large pre-amp to cover distribution losses. Reducing cable run by 50 ft reduces cable distribution loss by ~2 dB is very desirable. In this case, would you still recommend your original approach?

    The tv antenna needs to be on the ridge. A D* dish should work with an under eave install.
     
  5. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Hi Battlezone,

    Do the clips work for holding the cable in a horizontal run only or can they be used for a vertical drop? How do you recommend holding the rg-6 from the tripod mount to the edge of the roof? Use same approach for the antenna mast ground?


    ***I should add that I have 1/2" of styrofoam beneath the siding and on top the plywood. How long are these screws? Are they long enough to get a grip on the plywood?
    Thanks!

    Rick
     
  6. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    These cable clips will work in any direction. The most common ones are only 1/2" long when screwed in, but there are 7/8" length available for a little more. They are sold in bags of 100. Even the long ones should be less than $10 a bag.

    Note that a white version is available, but the white ones are NOT UV stable, and will not hold up to outdoor use. Use the black ones only.
     
  7. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Okay, thanks for the info on the longer length version. The clips will be mounted on the North end of the house and will not be exposed to direct sunlight. View of the area is blocked by a storage shed so black clips are not a problem on the gray vinyl siding.
     
  8. wallfishman

    wallfishman Icon

    509
    0
    Dec 31, 2008
    i doubt even the 7/8th ones will go thru your siding and a 1/2 inch of styrofoam and then grip to plywood. you could however use the same clips with a few longer screws of your own like 1 1/4 exterior drywall screws. that will grip like you want.
     
  9. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

    3,682
    0
    Dec 8, 2006
    These clips do a hell of a job without requiring to go all the way to the plywood.
     
  10. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Hmmm, not sure how well the screw would stay in place if only in the styrofoam.... Personally, I won't trust the longevity of the cable install with short screws. Also, it seems advisable, IMO, to attach the screw at the narrow end of the lap siding rather than including the air pocket in the thicker end. But, if I do it that way, then cable will not lay flat on the wall. Probably better to just run it underneath the corner piece.
     
  11. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    If I can be permitted to vent a little here...

    Geez, I really hate the D* business model. Yes, they offer a great AAA discount but to receive it, you must go through D* and use their HSP. Assuming you get a good install, then no problems. But, I need/desire more than a conventional install. One of our local companies sells tvs and installs satellite service on the side. They also install antennas. To me, it should be possible to get the AAA discount *and* utilize our local talent. The locals have done a lot to convince me that D* is a good choice and bent over backwards, demoing equipment and answering many questions. I have no doubts that I would get excellent service through them. So why not just hire them?

    Cost is the reason. I would give up the $240 AAA discount and $100 off on second HD DVR. Plus, I would pay the custom fees for antenna install and the cost of antenna, cables, pre-amp, and assorted accessories. Ballparking, it would cost me $450 to use the local (loss of AAA discounts + install charges). But, how good is the HSP installer? No way of knowing... Would he do custom work for the antenna install. No way of knowing if he would or is even capable of doing it.

    DBSTalk is a marvelous forum and I've learned a great deal about both major sat services. There's several installers on this board that I would hire in a NY minute. But, the horror install stories really make one pause. I'm not a risk taker. The uncertainty has lead to inertia. I would like to be a D* sub but only at a reasonable cost and using people that I trust. D*'s business model is getting in the way here. Too bad the locals can't give me the AAA discount, same as those ordering directly through D*. :(
     
  12. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

    3,682
    0
    Dec 8, 2006
    Yup, it's a sad business.
    I did a custom job yesterday since the HSP barely tried/refused.

    But as we are dealers we can not honor any refer/AAA discounts.

    Only option it to call D* after custom work and see if you can get some credits to make up for any custom work.
     
  13. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Thanks for reading and replying Mertzen! You are one of the people that I wouldn't hesitate hiring for an install. The costs to get you to Idaho are probably too high though.... :)

    Best,

    Rick
     
  14. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

    3,682
    0
    Dec 8, 2006
    Hey I did just drive 800+miles yesterday to do an install. :rolleyes::lol:
     
  15. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Hee, hee. According to mapquest, Adams is only 2360 miles away from Idaho Falls! Only cost a couple c bills to get you here right?! ;):lol:
     
  16. Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

    6,081
    45
    Mar 18, 2008
    So order it through AAA and then hire the other techs to do all the custom work after the basic installation was done.
     
  17. Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

    3,682
    0
    Dec 8, 2006
    Sure, that should cover most of it :eek2::grin:
     
  18. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

    3,071
    0
    Feb 28, 2007
    As an appearance item one never runs cable down the center of a wall. The vertical line will really stand out. With DTV the extra cable run will usually not affect performance.

    For OTA lines...if you are right at the edge of loosing pic and cannot put up a bigger antenna,,,,perhaps painting the line before hanging or look for a compatible color. Coax is available in white black and gray. Other colors are made but you gotta look. The plastic vertical clips have always caused problems.......if they pull out you have cable AND plastic clips beating against the house. IF you nail them in you get the holes in the siding.

    You might consider an interior run if possible.

    Joe
     
  19. IDRick

    IDRick Godfather

    274
    0
    Feb 15, 2007
    Well, since I have the ear of a couple pros here... :)

    I have considered an alternative for the OTA distribution. We have tvs in our upstairs living room and downstairs in a family room. The alternative approach is to run the OTA coax down to the west edge of roof to a power passive splitter under the eave. One output would follow the eave south to the garage and over to the living room. The other output would drop down to the basement and over to the family room. The challenge is where to put the ground block for the coax because I end up with two entry locations to the home (basement and garage). I would like to put the ground block just before the power passing splitter because it would be an easy drop down to the ground rods (interconnected to house ground). Is this acceptable?

    To clarify, the living room tv would have a 80 ft run after the ground block (60 ft outdoors under the eave) and the basement tv would have a 10 ft run outdoors after the ground block.

    Thanks for your advice!

    Rick
     

Share This Page