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Second HDTV off one box?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by doabbs, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. Jul 6, 2010 #1 of 12
    doabbs

    doabbs Cool Member

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    Oct 18, 2009
    Is it possible to run 2 HDTV's off of one box or will HDCP prevent that? I currently have my Plasma hooked up via HDMI in the living room and have a COAX (RG 6) running into the bedroom with a Standard Def TV. I want to put a small LCD or Plasma in there but wanted to know if I would need another box or not?
     
  2. Jul 6, 2010 #2 of 12
    Stuart Sweet

    Stuart Sweet The Shadow Knows!

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    Well you could definitely run component to a second TV. There are very few channels that require HDCP.
     
  3. Jul 6, 2010 #3 of 12
    jimmie57

    jimmie57 Hall Of Fame

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    You would need to use something other than the Coax cable for the HDTV.
    This website has lots of choices: http://www.monoprice.com/products/subdepartment.asp?c_id=102&cp_id=10235

    A simple choice would be to use the Red, Green, Blue Video and the Red and White Audio cable for the second hookup. Those people have them all made up in one cable depending on how long of a distance you need.

    You would probably also need a RF capable remote since you would be operating it from another room.

    Good luck.
     
  4. Jul 6, 2010 #4 of 12
    doabbs

    doabbs Cool Member

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    Oct 18, 2009
  5. Jul 6, 2010 #5 of 12
    ciurca

    ciurca Godfather

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    or just get a hdmi switch and some longer hdmi cables.
     
  6. Jul 6, 2010 #6 of 12
    jaguar325

    jaguar325 Legend

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    I have a lot of experience sharing DVRs between two rooms. The question comes down to what you want to watch and how important sound quality is because solving for these factors affects the cost.

    The simplest solution for "HD" in both rooms is to run HDMI to one set and component/digital audio to the other. This will get you up to 1080p on the one connected via HDMI but will only get you 1080i on the one connected via component. DD audio should be available to both rooms (if you can use it). If you want to have the option to watch 1080p content in the second room, the only option I am aware of is some sort of switch or splitter. I use a Gefen splitter (EXT-HDMI1.3-142D) which is the only one I found that would reliably split 1080p signal on HDMI (with full HDCP) and preserve digital audio stream -- most splitters do OK with the video but dumb the sound down to 2-channel. In my case, I wanted full 1080p and Dolby Digital in both rooms. The Gefen splitter has been doing this for me about 6 months with no problems (tested with VOD 1080p programming).

    Good luck to you.

    Big K
     
  7. Jul 6, 2010 #7 of 12
    doabbs

    doabbs Cool Member

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    Oct 18, 2009
    Well I'm glad the answer is, it's possible. I guess the only issue then is snaking HDMI or 5 (RCA) cables up through the wall. I've already got a spare piece of cable I left for just such a thing but the size of these type connectors wasn't accounted for when I drilled the hole for the RG6 and Cat5e.
     
  8. Jul 6, 2010 #8 of 12
    prospect60

    prospect60 Legend

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    http://www.monoprice.com/products/search.asp?keyword=hdmi+cat6&x=7&y=4

    If you want to try something other than running long large bundles, you could try one of these type products to run the signal over ethernet cable (definitely cheaper per foot and loads easier to run through walls). Up to 40-50 feet the cheapest version seems to work pretty well and Monoprice return policy is pretty solid if it doesn't work for you.
     
  9. Jul 6, 2010 #9 of 12
    TomCat

    TomCat Broadcast Engineer

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    The answer to the first part is "yes" (already answered) but the answer to the second part is "probably". As Stuart says, it is not an issue yet because of the paucity of HDCP content. But if HDCP ever ramps up, it may only allow the HDMI connection to work.

    They are busy trying to plug the analog hole. And that is probably only a matter of time. I know that when I change inputs on one set (HDMI) the handshake affects not only the HDMI port, but the component ports as well (connected to another set) as they blank a couple times until the handshake on the other, HDMI port, takes.

    So that proves the "yes" answer and implies the "probably" answer.
     
  10. EricRobins

    EricRobins Godfather

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    Feb 9, 2005
    I agree that Cat5 (something like this http://www.amazon.com/Cables-Go-40477-Cat5E-Extender/dp/B001RJIBN6) would likely be the best solution for 1080p. Do these "baluns" work w/ HDCP?

    What is the practical limitation on run-length? I see that product from Amazon lists 60m (200ft). Would HDMI (w/o the balun) be significantly shorter? Would component differ?

    Is there a "consumer grade" way to modulate the HD signal over coax, allowing the remote TV to use its digital tuner to "tune into" the HD station? (I know this exists pretty cheaply for SD, but have never seen a reasonably priced HD unit.)
     
  11. laciii

    laciii AllStar

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    Feb 6, 2008
    I use a ViewHD 2 Port HDMI 1x2 Powered Splitter with a 55" Samsung LED TV and an Emerson 30" LCD TV. I have a 45' HDMI cable running upstairs from my HDMI splitter. I have two HD DVRs an HR21 and HR20. The HR21 is hooked to the HDMI splitter. I bought the splitter from Amazon and the HDMI Cable from Blue Jeans. All three of my HDMI hookups are run through a Yamaha RX-V465 AV Receiver. I've had great luck with this setup.
     
  12. jaguar325

    jaguar325 Legend

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    Jan 2, 2006
    I think I agree with the advice to go ahead and get to HDMI (ver 1.3 or better) now if you can. If you decide to use HDMI and can cut holes big enough for the connectors, you might use the spare wire you already ran as a means of pulling the new cable through (assuming it's not tacked down). If you run HDMI through walls, make sure to look for Class 2 (fire rating) cable. Here is an example: http://store.stsi.com/hh-22cl2-25-f.html It not only meets fire code but the plugs are not all that big. Also, some cables built for thru-wall installations have a "jacket" that makes pulling them very easy.

    Good luck
     

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