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Security Torx™ Question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Throckmorton, Jan 8, 2011.

  1. Jan 8, 2011 #21 of 111
    Mike Bertelson

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    Unless you are used to modifying, adapting, or using the wrong tools you should not be using anything but the right tool for the job. And by being used to I mean over years of using hand tools where you are intimately familiar with the angles and forces applied as well as directional counter torque (very important when jury rigging something like using a small screwdriver to remove a security torx screw; otherwise you’ll bust that tip off in a heartbeat).

    Using something that modified, custom made or just plain the wrong tool for the job is a recipe for disaster. You should never workaround something unless you’ve already mastered doing it correctly to begin with. After two years as a mechanic in the Army and ten years in Navy I’ve seen plenty of people hurt themselves or break what they’re working on because they didn’t know what they’re doing. Not that they were bad at their job but just because they were unfamiliar with that particular component/equipment.

    You can get security bits from any hardware or auto parts store...except for those stupid bleepin’ five lobe torx-plus tools (just try to get that bleeping leatherman wave apart without one :mad:)...anyway, they’re really cheap and available anywhere these days. You’ll probably go get a set when you break off that tip on the little screwdriver anyway. :grin:

    If you’re comfortable with using something different then by all means do so. Keep in mind most people here are experienced tinkerers before you decide what fits your skill level. Sorry Rich, but if someone knows what they’re doing who are we to say otherwise. However, if you’re a novice then stick to using the right tool for the job.

    Mike
     
  2. Jan 8, 2011 #22 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    "It's so simple, a caveman can do it".
    Which leads to the hammer & chisel approach.. :nono: :nono: :nono:

    If you're a tool & die maker, then you have the skills, but if not, then don't try.
     
  3. Jan 8, 2011 #23 of 111
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    hey if you have to order bits and wait and the wait is not an problem then of course its the best way.
    but if you cannot wait and NEED to do it pointed nose vise grips are the best alternative tool, they do NOT affect the actual torx settings so the correct tool can be used later.
    its not like gripping with pliers and slipping, small pointed nose (chisel type not blunt) will grip tightly and allow you to move it enough to do by hand.
     
  4. Jan 8, 2011 #24 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    "when properly used" :lol:
     
  5. Jan 8, 2011 #25 of 111
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    :lol: not sure proper use would apply here :)
    it is a work around, but as far as work arounds go its the safest as normal tool can be used after.
     
  6. Jan 8, 2011 #26 of 111
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    My neighbor once brought over an old gas tank with a sender he wanted out.
    It was attached with some odd screws that looked something like (_) [on the inside] with flats top/bottom.
    The only thing I had were a pair of micro channel locks which worked fine to remove them, by grabbing the outside.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2011 #27 of 111
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    yup same procedure, only difference is grips will lock so you can position better and move hands as needed.
     
  8. Jan 8, 2011 #28 of 111
    Rich

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    Actually, I think a small pair of side-cutters would do the job much better. The blunt end of side-cutters is an excellent tool for getting a screw loose. If you really have to use the wrong tool. But, if that blunt end slips off the head of the screw, you better hope you don't have a fold of skin stuck in them.

    Let me pose a question that seems really simplistic, but usually throws even skilled craftsmen: What is the best way to loosen a screw that is really tight? Without stripping it? You might be able to Google the answer, but that would be cheating. Doesn't matter what type of screw, works for all of them.

    Rich
     
  9. Jan 8, 2011 #29 of 111
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Use the correct size driver (nut or screw) and hit it with a hammer while turning the driver. You have to do it carefully and only hit hard enough to lossen it up. It's the same as using a impact wrench. I have a couple of impact drivers that I can put sockets or bits on just for removing stubborn fasteners...put the right socket/bit on it an hit with a hammer. :D

    Mike
     
  10. Jan 8, 2011 #30 of 111
    Rich

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    Nope. Not a bad way to do it tho. The answer is so simple.

    Rich
     
  11. Jan 8, 2011 #31 of 111
    Mike Bertelson

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    Short of heat or penetrating oils (both of which I try not to use) I got nothing. :shrug:

    I have a couple of drivers similar to this. Link

    I've always thought it was the right tool for the job. I must be missing something.

    Mike
     
  12. Jan 8, 2011 #32 of 111
    BattleScott

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    Use the right type and size screwdriver for the head of the screw and twist with enough force to loosen it. That's the best way.
     
  13. Jan 8, 2011 #33 of 111
    Rich

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    I should have said in the original question that you don't need anything but the proper screwdriver. Sorry.

    Yeah, I've got them too, great for working on motorcycles.

    Mine don't come with bits small enough for, say, a 10/24 screw.

    Rich
     
  14. Jan 8, 2011 #34 of 111
    Rich

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    Nope.

    Rich
     
  15. Jan 8, 2011 #35 of 111
    veryoldschool

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    What we always end up doing: piss on it. :lol:
     
  16. Jan 8, 2011 #36 of 111
    Rich

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    Almost fell off my chair! Good one!

    I hit baseballs for exercise on a field with two baseball fields side by side. On the other field, a friend of mine hits golf balls. I damn near drove him nuts this summer after I asked him who the greatest Latino baseball player of all time was. He had his son-in-law researching the question and offered up a new name every time I saw him. In a couple months we'll be at it again. And I'm not gonna answer the question until he comes up with the correct answer.

    Rich
     
  17. Jan 8, 2011 #37 of 111
    BattleScott

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    If that's not the best way to loosen a screw without stripping it, then the entire concept of screws and screw drivers is absurd. If there is a better way to loosen a screw than that, it should be the preferred tool for manipulating screws in the first place.
     
  18. Jan 8, 2011 #38 of 111
    veryoldschool

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    I'm waiting for Rich to say "tighten it first" and then loosen it.
     
  19. Jan 8, 2011 #39 of 111
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Perhaps one more condition require to clarify to separate rusty with overtightened screw ?
     
  20. Jan 8, 2011 #40 of 111
    Rich

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    But the screwdriver is the tool you use to loosen it. It's really simple. :)

    Rich
     

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