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Selectable Output Control on PPV

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by kojak32, Nov 28, 2009.

  1. kojak32

    kojak32 Cool Member

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    Jan 1, 2009
    I will begin this post by saying that I will be calling DirecTV tomorrow to ask for my 2.99 back for the movie I rented last night. I rented a VOD PPV movie that was released in 1996 and was not in HD.

    Now before I continue I would like to first explain that I have wireless video receivers connected to non HD TV sets in other rooms of my house. The transmitter is connected to the HD DVR's in the livingroom. I do this because I often like to begin watching a program in the livingroom and then finish watching it in the bedroom before I go to sleep.

    I don't think I have ordered a PPV movie from DirecTV in the past 5 years perhaps even longer. The reason for this is because they are overpriced. When I can go to Redbox and rent a movie for a buck. Or rent through Netflix. However my wife was asking me about a movie that she wanted to see again and could not find at a video store, so I did a search on the DVR and found it as a VOD PPV. I decided to order it. Which I ended up having to call DirecTV to do because even though I was using my broadband internet connection to download the movie, the DVR was telling me I had to have a broadband internet connection to order the movie?

    So after the rep was able to clear that hurdle for me, we began watching the movie on the HD TV in the living room. About half way into the movie, maybe a little less than half we decided to finish the movie in bed. To my amazement I was not allowed to do that because of DirecTV and the MPAA, because they decided that I was not allowed to watch a movie that I just paid to rent on my bedroom TV because they disabled the analog output for that movie.

    On my bedroom TV I saw a black screen and a blue box that states, (not word for word) The content protection of this movie is not supported by this output, please connect the red, green, blue, cables to your TV to watch this movie. :mad:

    I have never seen this before and could not believe it. I did some research online about this and found S.O.C, which stands for Selectable Output Control. I'm sure some of you are familiar with the term already, I try to stay up to date on this stuff but somehow this is the first time I have heard of it.

    So basically this is a copy protection system that allows the content to tell the device, in this case the DVR that the movie can't be output through the analog connections to prevent it from being copied. Or in my case from being watched on my bedroom TV. How can this be legal? I paid for a DVR that has different types of connections for outputting video, but now the MPAA is dictating to me if I can use a certain type of output on the back of my box and therefore telling me I can't watch this movie on every TV in my home.

    I am sure in the MPAA's mind this is logical. I will run out tomorrow and purchase a new HD TV for my bedroom and the equipment so I can watch this rented movie on that TV. I better get going because my viewing period will end in less than 24 hours. Now we all know I am not going to do that, what I am going to do; (and I hope DirecTV and the MPAA is reading this) is get a credit for the movie that I did not get to finish. I should not be forced to watch that movie on only one TV in my home. This is considered fair use. I can also tell you I will never order another PPV movie from DirecTV again.

    After having this happen they just guaranteed that until this dictatorial technology is removed from their service I will not use PPV. Did you hear that MPAA? Once again you have done exactly what consumers keep warning you about with your copy protection crap, you have prevented a paying customer from watching a movie, and therefore you will lose money because of it.

    In conclusion I read a number of articles on this SOC technology and in every article I have read so far states the MPAA wants this control so they will be able to release movies on TV faster to shorten the time it takes a movie to go from Theater to TV or to release movies on TV at the same time as in the Theater. This is why you should never trust what the MPAA says because as I stated at the beginning, the movie I rented was released in Theater's 13 years ago in 1996. Hey but I understand they are just trying to protect the revenue:confused:
     
  2. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Northern VA
    I understand your frustration with this, but this is not something you can blame DirecTV for. This is something that has come straight from the movie industry, including the 24 hr viewing rule.

    A workaround for your viewing issue, would be to disconnect your HDMI connection from the receiver to your HDTV. As long as there is an HDMI connection from the receiver to a TV, on movies with this protection, you cannot have the analog connection simultaneously. However, without the HDMI connection, the analog connection will work.

    - Merg
     
  3. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    And this copy protection is present on all TV providers: DirecTV, Dish, Comcast, Time Warner, Cox, etc. because it is required by law.

    And you can expect those controls to be further tightened in the future, and all providers will have to comply in order to maintain their licenses.
     
  4. kojak32

    kojak32 Cool Member

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    Jan 1, 2009
    I tried unhooking the HDMI cable and it is working now. I still don't agree with this level of control. I wonder if all the cable and satellite providers would come together on this issue and say we will all agree to not go along with this abuse of technology, how long would it take for the MPAA to change their tune? I mean if no pay broadcast provider can get their license renewed and therefore can't broadcast the movie studio content they would start losing money immediately, I understand that the providers would also lose money but it would be a game of chicken who will flinch first.

    We all need to be concerned about this type of control being allowed without checks and balances, because the next step will be the MPAA telling manufacturers of tech, that they can't display their content unless the consumer buys a special MPAA connector. If you think this is to far fetched look at how strict HDMI is. This will happen. I think it is cyclical however, the pendulum will swing to one extreme for a while and then to the other; but in the end the consumer pays the price and I am not just talking about money.

    Just remember the golden rule- he who has the gold makes the rules, and in this case controls how, when, and what you watch. :(
     
  5. litzdog911

    litzdog911 Well-Known Member

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    Mill Creek, WA
    kojak32:
    Satellite and cable providers are way too dependent on Hollywood for their content. They won't battle Hollywood over this copy protection stuff. Expect it to get even worse in the future.
     
  6. David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    we consumers are thieves and MUST be treated as such.
     
  7. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Northern VA
    The beatings will continue until morale improves!

    - Merg
     
  8. Lee L

    Lee L Hall Of Fame

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    Please show me the law that says this is required.

    It is simply something that the MPAA has pressured providers and equipment manufacturers to implement at the threat of long protracted legal action. Legal action the MPAA knows it would not eventually win, but could possibly delay any new equipment so long or keep a provider from having access to content for so long that it is an effective tool to use to get what they want.
     
  9. Joe C

    Joe C Godfather

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    To the OP, lesson learned. You as the consumer can show you disgust of the whole 24 hr rule crap by not ordering PPV movies. If enough people did this Hollywood would notice. Also I'm not a fan of disabling the analog outputs while the HDMI cable is connected, thats pure BS and they know it. For my movie needs I use Redbox and Netflix, I like to have control of the media.
     
  10. MartyS

    MartyS New Member

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    As you mentioned in your post, I don't think that it's a law... I think it might be a contractual agreement between the Studios, the MPAA and the vendors (not just D*).

    I doubt that we can get access to the contractual language (nor do I really want to). I just don't think it's a LAW that you can simply point to.
     
  11. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Salem, OR
    If it is written into a legal contract, it is backed by law.
     
  12. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    Nov 13, 2007
    Well, there are some applicable protections covered by the DMCA.
     

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