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Should Steve Jobs be placed on the list of great inventors?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by Chris Blount, Apr 30, 2012.

Should Steve Jobs be placed on the list of great inventors?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    33 vote(s)
    38.4%
  3. Not Sure

    53 vote(s)
    61.6%
  1. Apr 30, 2012 #41 of 131
    phat78boy

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    I agree to a point. When the item you invent or reintroduce revolutionizes the product before it, that is an invention in my eyes.

    Prop planes were around long before jets, but jets I would say were an invention because of how they changed the world. They provided such a huge leap in flying that the previous method seemed irrelevant.
     
  2. Apr 30, 2012 #42 of 131
    TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    I don't think improving a manufacturing process is "inventing" although technically I guess he "invented" some of the parts of that process. I think most people think of the term "inventing" to mean create a item that has never been seen before like Ron Popeil's Salad Shooter. There was never anything even similar to that.

    I agree with you but looking at the definition of an INVENTION I guess he (Jobs) technically could be considered and "inventor:"

    in·ven·tion
       [in-ven-shuhn]
    noun
    1.
    the act of inventing.
    2.
    U.S. Patent Law . a new, useful process, machine, improvement, etc., that did not exist previously and that is recognized as the product of some unique intuition or genius, as distinguished from ordinary mechanical skill or craftsmanship.
     
  3. Apr 30, 2012 #43 of 131
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Could you elaborate a touch on your thought process here?
     
  4. Apr 30, 2012 #44 of 131
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Bingo! If you expand the definition of invention from merely physical entities, then he is right there with the top ten. Even if all he did was invent a way to make a tablet a useful and sought after concept, he'd be notable, though not necessarily in the top ten.
     
  5. May 1, 2012 #45 of 131
    Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Without him, the cool stuff may not have happened.

    For that, I give him a yes.

    With the way most CEOs run businesses today (Wall Street), I wish he was still here for another 10-20 years.
     
  6. May 1, 2012 #46 of 131
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    He shouldn't be in the list, if it happen - the list will lost its value.

    Each boss whom his employees getting patents has his name on many of these. Some including his name while it was with very minimal involvement. Seen that personally in real life many times in many places.
     
  7. May 1, 2012 #47 of 131
    phrelin

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    First of all, the web site linked reads as follows(emphasis added):
    I'm still in the "not sure" column about Job's in the future even from that perspective.

    Frankly, I don't think of this guy as a "great" inventor:
    But since he's there Job's might be 60 years from now.

    Even holding a patent doesn't make you a "great" inventor which is the title of this thread.

    There is a Timeline of historic inventions in Wikipedia. Also we have to be careful of facts. The article at the link in the OP was accurate when it said about Edison:
    It's always seemed weird to me how many American kids think Edison invented the first lightbulb. It was first invented by Sir Joseph Wilson Swan.

    The thing about Job's is that there are a lot of people who erroneously believe Apple created GUI-windows-based computing.

    Popularity is a bad way to establish who is a "great" inventor. It's a great way to establish who is a "celebrity" in whatever classification you might want to rank people.
     
  8. May 1, 2012 #48 of 131
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    Put him on a list of great managers or CEO ...
     
  9. May 1, 2012 #49 of 131
    phrelin

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    Stanley Cohen, Paul Berg and Herbert Boyer likely will be the most Important inventors of the second half of the 20th Century. If you know why I assert this then you know why I consider Steve Jobs not very important in the category "inventors".
     
  10. May 1, 2012 #50 of 131
    brian188

    brian188 Legend

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    I fall in the "To soon to tell" category.

    Right now, the i-phone, i-Pad, etc. are great devices that many, many people use daily. And undoubtedly made their mark on the world. 10 years from now will that be the case? 20 years? 30 years?

    So, regardless of weather you credit Steve Jobs as the "inventor" of these devices, a visionary, or and improver of an existing device you can't at this point lump him with the likes of Ford when it comes to his "invention(s)."

    I'm willing to bet the next great thing to replace the i-Pad is right around the corner, and the device to replace that device is getting closer by the day. In 10, 20, or 30 years will we be laughing at how archaic the i-Pad is as we do of the VCR or portable CD player today?
     
  11. May 1, 2012 #51 of 131
    MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    I stated in post #36 he is "credited" for inventing them.
     
  12. May 1, 2012 #52 of 131
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Credited by whom?

    Mike
     
  13. May 1, 2012 #53 of 131
    TBlazer07

    TBlazer07 Grumpy Grampy

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    His creditors of course!
     
  14. May 1, 2012 #54 of 131
    dpeters11

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  15. May 1, 2012 #55 of 131
    Mike Bertelson

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    Those are patents he's named on and as I posted above, you can patented a tape measure with a redesigned case. It doesn’t mean you invented the tape measure.

    There are twelve people named as Inventors on that patent which took an existing technology and put it in a smaller case. Now the software/firmware that makes it all work is definitely new. I’m not a fan of iTunes (which I only use for our iPhone) but it coupled with the firmware on the device (iPod) is certainly new and innovative.

    However, since there are twelve people names on that patent, is Steve Jobs the inventor of the iPod? Couldn’t the same be said about the other eleven? How would someone feel if they were one of the other eleven but he’s known as the inventor of the iPod?

    Does being named on a patent mean that person has invented something even if it already existed?

    Is re-purposing existing technology an invention or an innovation?

    Is it fair for a single person to be credited as the inventor of every patent that contains that persons name when there are also others named on the patent? How do we decide who gets the credit?

    Additionally, the way things work these days in large corporate R&D there are very few, if any, patents with just a single inventor named. In the corporate environment teams invent things; rarely an individual. That has to figure into this somehow but I certainly don’t have a clue how.

    Further, most inventions usually have a basis in previous work...someone else’s work. The guy who actually makes it useful and/or commercially viable is the one who usually gets the credit. One could argue that digital music players, PCs, cell phones, etc. were already commercially viable devices so does one getting patents in these areas make one the inventor of these technologies?

    He was a visionary but I’m unsure whether or not he was an inventor. If we consider him an inventor where does he rate when compared with Edison or da Vinci?

    Mike
     
  16. May 1, 2012 #56 of 131
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Exactly.

    Patents have been approved for some of the lamest things...including rounded corners on devices for example. Try enforcing that one.

    I'd put Mr. Jobs in the category of master re-packager and super-marketer, not an inventor.
     
  17. May 1, 2012 #57 of 131
    dpeters11

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    If you can't patent that sort of thing, what would you put it under, a trademark?

    They have to have design protection somehow.
     
  18. May 1, 2012 #58 of 131
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Rounded corners....really?

    I think a caveman may own that one already. :D
     
  19. May 1, 2012 #59 of 131
    dpeters11

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    Not saying rounded corners specifically and without restriction. But if someone came out with a competing device that looked exactly like an iPhone 4S body, just based on the design, there should be some protections preventing that.

    Situations like Monster suing Blue Jeans because their cables had similar design elements dictated by necessity, no.

    But if the patent system allows for it, is it wiser to apply for the patent or not? I think it's better to go for the patent. The system is breaking down, but companies have to work with the system as it is, not how it should be changed.
     
  20. May 1, 2012 #60 of 131
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Agree.
     

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