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SixtoReport: D12 Satellite Info in Post#1 - Live!

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Sixto, Jul 27, 2008.

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  1. Jan 16, 2010 #2281 of 10270
    bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

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    Bainbridge...
    The Large Binocular Telescope on Mt. Graham in Arizona would probably be the best bet (2 8.4 meter mirrors with a resolving power equivalent to a 22.8 meter telescope).
     
  2. Jan 16, 2010 #2282 of 10270
    raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    Hmm, I guess a telescope would have to have a 700x power then, not 70x.
     
  3. Jan 16, 2010 #2283 of 10270
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    It's not a matter of magnification but resolution.
     
  4. Jan 16, 2010 #2284 of 10270
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    And, for terrestrial telescopes, once you get above 5" there is a marginal, if any, increase in resolution. It does increase its light gathering more than resolution.

    Most of the identifiable pictures I’ve seen were of orbiting sats and not the geostationary ones. I haven’t been following D12 much so I don’t know where it is but if we can see it before it gets to the Clark Belt we might be able to get a picture of it that’s recognizable.

    Mike
     
  5. Jan 16, 2010 #2285 of 10270
    raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    See, I told you I didn't know anything about telescopes! Now, if you need to know anything about Studebakers, I might be able to help you.
     
  6. Jan 16, 2010 #2286 of 10270
    P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    I have printed from Internet a picture with many GSO sats over NA;there are just bright spots. I recall an exposure was pretty long.
     
  7. Jan 16, 2010 #2287 of 10270
    Jeremy W

    Jeremy W Hall Of Fame

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    It's already too far away.
     
  8. Jan 16, 2010 #2288 of 10270
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I bet you know more about telescopes then I do about Studebakers...other then I think they're pretty cool looking I know zero beyond that. :)

    Mike
     
  9. Jan 16, 2010 #2289 of 10270
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Then we're not getting a picture. :shrug:

    Mike
     
  10. Jan 16, 2010 #2290 of 10270
    longrider

    longrider Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    Since everybody wants a pic... :)
     

    Attached Files:

  11. Jan 16, 2010 #2291 of 10270
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I'm sure it does. I saw Shoemaker-Levy 9 impact through a Dobsonian, at an observatory in central Ohio. Heard Dobson speak there once as well, interesting guy.
     
  12. Jan 16, 2010 #2292 of 10270
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    By all accounts, Dobson is a fascinating fellow. His idea that an inexpensive large mirror, thinner than that necessary for an any-attitude polar mount but high-quality enough for visual observations was truly revolutionary. A 10" is really nice - large enough to resolve a good bit of M82 and even some of the brightest clusters in the Andromeda Galaxy, enough to split some nice binaries, but small enough to lug around in an SUV without much effort. And again, Saturn's rings and the Galilean moons of Jupiter look fantastic. :)
     
  13. Jan 17, 2010 #2293 of 10270
    raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    About all I know is that you look in one end, and with the good ones, you aren't looking in the same direction it's pointing in. That's about all I know about telescopes!:)
     
  14. Jan 17, 2010 #2294 of 10270
    bb37

    bb37 Godfather

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    Same could be said for some Studebakers, couldn't it? (Thinking of a 1950 Starlight Coupe.)
     
  15. Jan 17, 2010 #2295 of 10270
    smiddy

    smiddy Tain't ogre til its ogre

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    Looking good or NOM-MEE-NULL! :lol:
     
  16. Jan 17, 2010 #2296 of 10270
    LameLefty

    LameLefty I used to be a rocket scientist

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    New TLE this morning . . . analysis in work. :)

    Code:
    Name			Directv-12 032
    NORAD #			36131
    COSPAR designator	2009-075-A  
    Epoch (UTC)		2010-01-16 15:51:24
    Orbit # at Epoch	26
    Inclination		0.176
    RA of A. Node		269.309
    Eccentricity		0.0741924
    Argument of Perigee	191.511
    Revs per day		1.00296858
    Period			23h 55m 44s (1435.73 min)
    Semi-major axis		42 158 km
    Perigee x Apogee	32 652 x 38 907 km
    BStar (drag term)	0.000000000 1/ER
    Mean anomaly		178.526
    Propagation model	SDP4
    Element number / age	32 / 0 day(s)
    
    Very small tweaks again.
     
  17. Jan 17, 2010 #2297 of 10270
    DodgerKing

    DodgerKing Hall Of Fame

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    Updated my spreadsheet and graphs, but I will wait until the tweaks become more pronounced before I post a new graph. Right now the increments are so small that the graphs still look the same.
     
  18. Jan 17, 2010 #2298 of 10270
    Sixto

    Sixto Well-Known Member

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    Yep, same. Behind 25 hours.
    Code:
    Name			DirecTV-12
    NORAD #			36131
    COSPAR designator	2009-075-A  
    Epoch (UTC)		01-16-2010 15:51:24
    Orbit # at Epoch	26
    Inclination		0.176
    RA of A. Node		269.309
    Eccentricity		0.0741924
    Argument of Perigee	191.511
    Revs per day		1.00296858
    Period			23h 55m 44s (1435.73 min)
    Semi-major axis		42 158 km
    Perigee x Apogee	32 652 x 38 907 km
    Element number / age	32 / 1 day(s)
    
    Lon			74.2433° W
    Lat			0.0131° N
    Alt (km)		38 919.950
    
    [B][U] # [/u] [u] Date[/u] [u]Time GMT[/u] [u]Perigee[/u]  [u]Apogee[/u] [u]  Gap [/u] [u]Chg-Hrs[/u] [u] Day  [/u] [u]  Long  [/u] [u]  Lat  [/u] [u]Inclin[/u][/B]
    Target ----------> 35,786 x 35,786      0                 76.00°W  0.00°N  0.00°[B][COLOR="Blue"]
    032 01/16 15:51:24 32,652 x 38,907  6,255 +12.10H 18.65D  74.24°W  0.01°N  0.18°[/COLOR][/B]
    031 01/16 03:45:22 32,651 x 38,908  6,257 +11.03H 18.14D  75.10°W  0.00°S  0.18°
    030 01/15 16:43:41 [B][COLOR="Red"]32,651[/COLOR][/B] x [B][COLOR="Red"]38,908[/COLOR][/B]  6,257 +53.65H 17.68D  75.97°W  0.04°N  0.18°
    029 01/13 11:04:56 31,494 x 38,917  7,423 +11.08H 15.45D  66.45°W  0.07°N  0.08°
    028 01/13 00:00:00 [B][COLOR="Red"]31,495[/COLOR][/B] x [B][COLOR="Red"]38,915[/COLOR][/B]  7,420 + 8.06H 14.98D  89.56°W  0.07°S  [B][COLOR="Red"]0.07°[/COLOR][/B]
    
    [URL="http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?t=164555"]Post#1[/URL] has the complete history. The last 5 updates are above.
     
  19. Jan 17, 2010 #2299 of 10270
    raoul5788

    raoul5788 Guest

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    Now that there is funny!:lol: And true!
     
  20. Jan 18, 2010 #2300 of 10270
    syphix

    syphix Hall Of Fame

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    *crickets.....crickets...*

    Nothing lately? Really?
     
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