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Snakes

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Mar 11, 2013.

  1. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    My first Westie terrier was a real predator. He'd kill anything I allowed him to. He taught my present Westie what the machete was for and as soon as I brought one out they both were in immediate hunting mode. My first Westie passed a couple years ago, but my present Westie still carries on. I'm not surprised about your dog and the garter snake. I don't think dogs think snakes (small snakes) are dangerous. They seem to have to be taught. That's an opinion formed by me based on observing only two dogs.

    About 10 years ago, my brother-in-law's ex-wife and his daughter were bitten after a fireworks display ended and they took a shortcut thru the woods. Both survived, but they do have scars. This occurred near Gettysburg.

    That's the snake that becomes "invisible" when the leaves fall. He must have stepped on it, no?

    Rich
     
  2. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I'm gonna have nightmares... :lol:

    Rich
     
  3. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I've heard (though unwilling to test the theory) that some sea snakes have potent enough venom to make a King Cobra seem harmless in comparison, but the same species of sea snake is also referred to as "friendly". So basically sounds like, they are non aggressive, if they do bite, you have a 75 percent chance of not being invenomated, but if you are, you will die.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Most of the time, I don't miss on the first swing. When I bought my first machete, right after we moved into our house, I thought that might happen, but they're not as quick as I had been led to believe.

    Here's the really odd thing I've noticed over the past few years: The ribbon snakes, usually no more than 3' long, had always coiled up in a striking position when we approached, and they did strike. Nobody ever got bit. Now, they don't run from my wife or son or granddaughter, but when I go near one, they take off. And if they're in bushes and see the machete they panic.

    I know this sounds like it can't possibly be true, but I've seen it happen many times in the past few years. Can snakes learn and pass that knowledge around in some manner? Very puzzling.

    Rich
     
  5. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I've taken to stepping on their tails when they take off. Getting kinda tricky because they come back over their bodies and strike. I usually don't get the head shots I used to get, end up chopping them up.

    Rich
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    They're fairly long aren't they?

    Rich
     
  7. Polardog

    Polardog Legend

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    In Vietnam we were told to never walk around the compound (especially at night) without wearing your boots because of green bamboo vipers.
    Stories were also told to never enter enemy buildings because the Viet Cong would nail bamboo vipers by the tail in entrances usually about neck height. Mad as hell the snakes would strike anything walking through the door. 3 or 4 angry snakes striking and biting you made you a casualty. Always stick the barrel of your rifle through the door before entering just to be sure.
    I never personally experienced this nor did I ever see a bamboo viper in person in my 19 months in Vietnam. 10" long centipedes and cat sized rats I did see.
     
  8. Polardog

    Polardog Legend

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    I've seen rat snakes nearly 5 foot long around my property here in NW NJ. Maybe longer. Of course I'm estimating. Beautiful black and fast. Nearly every one I've seen has been very near the house. Tons of garter snakes and lots of young in the spring. A Copperhead once or twice.
     
  9. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    In a book written in 1938 (don't take any of this as absolutely factual, I read that book a long, long time ago), by Raymond L. Ditmars, one of the most noted herpetologists of his time, he stated that "there are no venomous snakes in NJ" (or words to that effect). Since then I've found rattlers in NW NJ, in the Poconos and in a shore town. Copperheads seem to be all over NJ. Can't prove it, but I think I saw a moccasin in Johnson Park, very near to where I live. Fit the description. Used to see him laying on a log that jutted out into a pond most times I went to the park.

    Just Googled Ditmars and that is his right name. He died in 1942. Interesting book, but by the time I read it, I knew he was wrong about the snakes in NJ.

    Rich
     
  10. dennisj00

    dennisj00 Hall Of Fame

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    Like I posted above, I gained a new respect for snakes and how harmless they really are. I won't be charming any venomous ones but Phasor (the boa) never bit or even struck at me. He did strike my roomate, but he was reaching into the cage while we were feeding him white mice.

    The first summer he was already 2' + long (from 10" when we bought him) and I entered my house carrying him in the cage we had built. Of course, Mom's reaction was 'You're not bringing that thing in the house.

    Two weeks later, I had to go back to school for a week seminar. When I got home, I found out Mom had been trying to feed him hamburger on a string!

    At school (NC State), feeding him was easy. The animal husbandry labs had to kill dozens, if not hundreds of white mice every week. Every other Friday or so, I'd take a paper bag and after class drop by the lab and pick up 5 or 6 mice. Starting with small new-borns and 4 years later, pregnant females about the size of your forearm.

    It was almost like **** fights in the dorm those nights. . . but the mice usually lost.

    Most all non-venomous are your friends in that they eat hundreds of small mammals (mice, rats, squirrels) that are generally bent on destroying your stuff. King Snakes and black snakes also keep the venomous population down.

    We have rattlers in the dense woods and farmlands but mostly copperheads. They're more interested in getting away from you than harming you.

    Eastern NC does have a rare coral snake that is pretty deadly but rarely encounters any human.
     
  11. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    It's too far away from land for the snakes to "raft" their was to Hawaii, but imagine if they started having the same problems as Florida.

    And then there's Guam and it's brown tree snakes.

    Rich
     
  12. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    At least rattlers give you a chance to hear them.

    Rich
     
  13. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    That sounds right.

    Rich
     
  14. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Good story, never heard about the green vipers before.

    Rich
     
  15. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Never see rattlers?

    Rich
     
  16. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    We see a lot of stories from NYC about folks that feed their big snakes chickens, defeathered chickens. Their owners get that chicken smell on their hands and other parts of their bodies and get killed by the constrictors who must think: If it smells like a chicken, it must be a chicken.

    I brought a garter snake in the house while my mother was washing dishes. She hit me with a frying pan, a cast iron frying pan. Never did that again.

    I do know that, but I just can't abide them. I did have a mouse problem a few years ago after killing 18 snakes during the summer months. Got rid of the mice quickly and the snakes are still here.

    Read a story about a woman who stepped on a copperhead and it nailed her in the calf. She had a rough time recovering from that.

    Coral snakes chew rather than use fangs to distribute the venom, but it is deadly. There's a rhyme for telling them apart from some other snakes that mimic their coloring and stripes.

    Rich
     
  17. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    We used to catch garter snakes when we were kids. We would keep them for a while and then let them go.
     
  18. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    I came home from work one day, and found a small snake about a foot long stretched out on the threshold of my door jamb. I had keys in one hand, a briefcase in the other, and mail tucked under my arm, so I started to step over him to put some of it down to deal with him. At that very moment, with my foot in the air, poised above a snake, my boss called... my cell phone... which was clipped to my belt....and set to vibrate. I must have jumped three feet in the air. By the time I dealt with the phone call the snake was gone.
     
  19. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    This one was roughly five feet. But when it plays dead, they sort of contract and look like a twisted ribbon.

    But my balcony is on the second floor of my home and I haven't figure out how it got up there.
     
  20. P Smith

    P Smith Mr. FixAnything

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    from a roof after getting there from a tree ... seen how raccoons doing that pretty well ...
     

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