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So Tired Of The Price Game!

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by CallMeCoach, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. Jan 29, 2013 #21 of 202
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Heck, if I remember right, California even looked at your satellite fleet (back in the Hughes days) and wondered if they should be getting property tax...
     
  2. Jan 29, 2013 #22 of 202
    CallMeCoach

    CallMeCoach Mentor

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    Lol -- I'm going to go find my old bills and show you how it does. That's funny, you telling a stranger good luck on finding something that's happened to them. Seriously?
     
  3. Jan 29, 2013 #23 of 202
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 New Member

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    You were also told that by someone else...someone who works for DirecTV. The rates do not change from month to month.
     
  4. Jan 29, 2013 #24 of 202
    markrw58

    markrw58 Mentor

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    I have had DTV for 16 years and am about to begin my attempt to live without DTV. I decided to give it a try because I just don't know if the service justifies the cost anymore so I will be suspending my account as of February 1st. I am hooked up with Netflix, figured out which shows I can buy through iTunes, Amazon, etc and still have an antenna for over the air networks.

    The only areas I see as real problems will be Baseball, the DVR and the DIY channels for my wife. Wonder which one of us will crack first?
     
  5. Jan 29, 2013 #25 of 202
    CallMeCoach

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    Did it actually fail, or did the providers see that they could make more money the way they do it now and have resisted it ever since?


    Oh, and Netflix sure doesn't need any advertising to have 27 million customers in the US alone.


    It's coming -- people are sick of being bombarded with channels they don't want or need, and advertisements at every turn.
     
  6. Jan 29, 2013 #26 of 202
    CallMeCoach

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    You can still get a Tivo DVR, or have one through your PC.
     
  7. Jan 29, 2013 #27 of 202
    KyL416

    KyL416 Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Take a look at some recent Neilsen ratings. Unless you consider Honey Boo Boo quality, those are the types of shows that wil survive in an a-la-carte world. It's not about quality, it's about the quantity of viewers.

    And those advertisements are what help fund the networks. If you take a look at an industry rate sheet you would see most ad supported non-sports channels are less than 50 cents, it's the channels that air sports like ESPN and TNT that are the most expensive, as well as some non-ad supported channels like Disney Channel. Then of course you got the real non-ad supported channels like HBO, Showtime and Starz which are in the $10-15 range.
     
  8. Jan 29, 2013 #28 of 202
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 New Member

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    It failed. Also, Netflix is a service provider. Ad sales benefit content providers. You cannot expect an industry to thrive while at the same time suggesting a gutting of its revenue.
     
  9. Jan 29, 2013 #29 of 202
    Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I really miss the big dish days. When I have my 10 foot dish in the backyard with a legal descrambler, I was able to purchase individual channels a la carte and only payed about $20 a month. Of course there was no DVR at the time but it sure was cool and the picture was great (for non-HD).
     
  10. Jan 29, 2013 #30 of 202
    CallMeCoach

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    Yeah, well that's how it works. McDonalds doesn't live because the food is quality - ie good for you - they survive because it tastes good, is cheap, and provides quick/good service.


    I cant stand Honey Boo Boo or Buckwild, or any of that garbage, but if the market dictates it survives over Current Tv, or The O Network, so be it! Be better than the next guy or be gone.

    That's the point: have a model similar to Netflix.



    Company pays X channel X amount of dollars per customer, company then offers customer a variety of options for channels they want to watch for an amount enough above X to make a profit and provide quality service.


    Price per channel = Cost + % of cost charged for profit
     
  11. Jan 29, 2013 #31 of 202
    CallMeCoach

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    What was a descrambler and when did the a la carte end and why?
     
  12. Jan 29, 2013 #32 of 202
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 New Member

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    Then the cost simply shifts to companies like Netflix and their rates increase to the same levels we see with traditional providers. You simply do not understand the relationship between service providers, content owners, and production.

    Still waiting for proof of your monthly rate changes...
     
  13. Jan 29, 2013 #33 of 202
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    The providers don't see it that way. They leverage their higher rated/interesting channels with the lesser for a package to be retransmitted.
    They know they have some dogs, but if you want that cute puppy, you've got to also take the mutts too.
     
  14. Jan 29, 2013 #34 of 202
    CallMeCoach

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    A.) You obviously haven't read much in this thread. I said I wouldn't be able to dig up the bills until tonight or tomorrow.

    B.) That's such a blanket statement it's silly. "Their rates will just increase to the same levels with traditional providers" is stupid. if you want a whole bunch of channels, sure it might. But most people watch about 7 channels on a regular basis. Unless they're charging $18 per channel, I won't come anywhere close to what I'm paying now. That's the point: People don't want all of those channels, they want just what they want and that's.


    But yet I don't understand the relationship.


    Okay. Whatever you say. :lol:
     
  15. Jan 29, 2013 #35 of 202
    acostapimps

    acostapimps Hall Of Famer

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    This would work for folks who don't watch much live sports other than their local teams on local off air channels, and even if you do you could find around online to watch sports anyway, and if you watch a lot of TV shows series like the ones mention in the article there is plenty on Netflix and Hulu, not to mention there's even online live tv channels if you look around online.
     
  16. Jan 29, 2013 #36 of 202
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    To "understand", you need to look at the retransmission fee controversies, where Fox, Vicom, etc. will withhold channels causing blackouts until the terms have been negotiated and agreed to by both parties.
     
  17. Jan 29, 2013 #37 of 202
    Hoosier205

    Hoosier205 New Member

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    That's about how high rates would skyrocket to. You seem to be unaware that most channels are owned by companies that also own other channels that they bundle when selling to service providers. I'll slow it down...

    Prices go way up.
    Choices go way down.
    Content providers make far less money.
    Service providers make far less money.
    Less money is available to buy content.
    Less money is available for service providers to carry content.
    Far less money is available for production.
    You end up with far less, for a lot more.

    As Netflix has grown in popularity, so have the rates they must pay for content. You cannot expect to shift customers to platforms like that without rates going up. A content owner isn't going to ask less from Netflix than they would from a traditional provider.
     
  18. Jan 29, 2013 #38 of 202
    CallMeCoach

    CallMeCoach Mentor

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    Things are obviously moving that way, and it doesn't look like it's stopping anytime soon.


    An a la carte model and OTA antenna looks perfect to me.


    http://gigaom.com/2012/09/06/fios-tv-cord-cutting/
     
  19. Jan 29, 2013 #39 of 202
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I'd put it more that service providers "want to" see it moving that way.
    The content providers don't.
     
  20. Jan 29, 2013 #40 of 202
    KyL416

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    And Netflix isn't funding the development of any new series, most of the content they have is from other networks or via deals with a distributor for international shows that don't have US outlet.

    Arrested Development doesn't count, the show already existed and had a following. It's not like starting from scratch where even a pilot that never gets picked up needs funding for everyone in the cast and crew for the one episode they filmed.
     

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