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Sony "connected" TV's

Discussion in 'IPTV Hardware' started by Chris Blount, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

    17,312
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    Jun 22, 2001
    I might be in the market for one of the new "connected" TV's. The ones that have internet capability with Netflix, Amazon and other streaming services built in.

    Does anyone own one of these TV's? Right now I'm looking at the Sony BRAVIA KDL60NX720 60-inch 1080p 3D LED HDTV with Built-in WiFi. The PQ looks great but I wonder if I would really use the other built in internet features since I already have a ROKU Box, Apple TV and Panasonic Blu-Ray player with Netflix and such.

    How well do they work on the TV's? It seems it would be convenient having it on the TV itself.
     
  2. Chris Blount

    Chris Blount Creator of DBSTalk Staff Member Administrator DBSTalk Gold Club

    17,312
    28
    Jun 22, 2001
    Well, I ended up getting the Sony Bravia mentioned above. Here are a few thoughts.

    This TV is replacing my 2 1/2 year old Samsung 61" DLP. I wanted to get something thinner with no rear projection system and full HD 3D.

    Right out of the box, the picture is quite stunning. The colors are accurate and the contrast ratio is very good. As usual though with any "default" setting, the sharpness is up too high revealing digital artifacts with too much edge enhancement. A quick calibration with any calibration DVD or Blu-Ray takes care of these problems. I will say that I did not need to adjust the color and tint settings. They were spot on.

    When you first turn on the TV, you are presented with a series of screens to setup language, screen settings, network and other various options. It goes pretty quick. Nothing too difficult. If you use MAC security on your router, you will need to skip the network setup part and do it later since you will need to retrieve the MAC code from the network setup menus. Also, the internal WiFi adapter is 2.4 GHz only. It does not run at 5 GHz. You will need a separate adapter to do 5 GHz.

    Once I had everything setup, I did various tests from different sources. Satellite TV, Blu-Ray and online streaming from Netflix and YouTube. All looked excellent. As much as I'm not a big fan of "Motionflow" technology, this TV does it quite well so I might leave it turned on. Fast actions scenes with Motionflow look quite amazing.

    The anti-glare glass screen is the biggest surprise. Reflections are very subdued so if you have lots of light in the room, you won't have any problems seeing the picture.

    3D from true 3D sources work as expected. Things pop right out of the screen. The simulated 3D works just OK. Depth is not all that great. It's more of a novelty than anything else.

    The setup menus are very PS3'ish. Sort of the same design. If you have a PS3, you will be right at home when navigating the menus.


    Now a few of the flaws.

    1. When placing the TV on the included stand, its quite unstable. It seems that Sony was sort of lackluster when designing the stand. I guess they figure most people will mount the TV on the wall. In the documentation, it does mention a few ways to stabilize the TV but overall, it's probably not a good idea to use the stand especially if you have kids.

    2. The viewing angle quality could be a bit better. If you are right in front of the TV, the contrast and colors look wonderful. As soon as you stray a bit to the left, right, up or down, you begin to see some contrast issues especially in a dark room. Honestly, it's not a big deal but depending on the content you are watching, it could be a big problem for those sitting at an angle. I did notice that the TV automatically adjusts the picture depending on the light in the room to minimize the problem. Every LCD TV I own has this problem so it's really nothing new but Sony has done a pretty good job trying to keep it from being a huge issue.

    3. Since the screen is so flat, the hookups on the back have very thin clearance. If you have a HDMI cable with a thick outer shell on the connector, you might have a problem hooking it up. It took me a few minutes getting the HDMI cable just at the right angle so it would slip into the connector on the TV.

    As far as streaming, I'm very impressed. I have been trying out Netflix and Amazon VOD which is built in. With motionflow turned on, the picture is quite stunning and actually slightly clearer and sharper then using my ROKU and Apple TV. The great thing is that the optical output on the TV is Dolby Digital 5.1 capable so I simply pipe that back to my A/V receiver for full surround sound. Really awesome.
     

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