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static ip?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by millertime, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. millertime

    millertime Godfather

    370
    1
    Sep 2, 2007
    Can someone post or show me a link of step by step instructions for setting up static ip my dynamic is causing all kinds of drops from the cck and whole home dvr. My range is 192.168.0.1-192.168.0.19
     
  2. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,153
    546
    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    What router?

    I use Netgear, and simply went into the DVRs menus- Settings-Setup, etc. and changed the last two digits to ".24" or ".34". YMMV.
     
  3. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

    193
    1
    Dec 3, 2002
    On the road...
    That range for DHCP seems wonky. 192.168.0.1 is usually the IP address of the router, and should not be included in the DHCP range. I would change the DHCP range to 192.168.0.100-192.168.0.199.
     
  4. millertime

    millertime Godfather

    370
    1
    Sep 2, 2007
    Netgear router. So you don't change anything on your pc? Just in the dvr menu?
     
  5. carl6

    carl6 Moderator DBSTalk Club

    12,386
    902
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    You need to do two things. First, you need to limit the IP addresses your router will issue. Then pick an address outside of that range (in the example FlyingDiver provided, something below .100 or above .199) for the static IP you want to use. You then have to go into your DVR network setup and tell it to use static and program in the address you chose (outside of your DHCP range).
     
  6. millertime

    millertime Godfather

    370
    1
    Sep 2, 2007
    Thanks
     
  7. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    546
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    Winters,...
    With my Netgear I didn't have to do either of those things. I prefer an address that identifies my STBs, and they happen to fall within the router's native range.

    So, millertime, yes, just change the IP in the STB menu. PC has nothing to do with it, unless you're trying to do reservations or change the range. It is useful to show connected devices, though!
     
  8. carl6

    carl6 Moderator DBSTalk Club

    12,386
    902
    Nov 15, 2005
    Seattle, WA
    If you don't limit the router so it can't/won't issue the IP address (via DHCP) that you assigned to your box, then it is possible two devices could end up on your LAN with the same IP. That will cause problems. That is why you should limit the DHCP range and pick a static address outside of that range.
     
  9. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

    10,289
    35
    Jun 24, 2007
    Northern VA
    I posted the info about your router in your other thread about this topic that I was assisting you in.

    - Merg
     
  10. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    Agreed that two devices with same IP would be a bee's nest, but hasn't happened in two years of vigorous use. There's a cushion of over ten addresses between what is assigned by the router and what is static, and I really like having the DVR "self identified" by its addy, .25, .24, .34.

    Perhaps not all routers assign by lowest available, which is why I try to mention the brand and model of my router, a Netgear 3400.
     
  11. BAHitman

    BAHitman Godfather

    433
    0
    Oct 23, 2007
    Austin Texas
    If the router is following the DHCP spec, it will not assign an IP address that is in use on the network--even if it is in the lease pool. The problem is that not all routers follow the spec correctly, and thus might assign the address anyway so while one person has a router that follows the spec,you will have another with a router that was not properly tested, and fails to validate the address is free before assigning it, and that is why it's a bad idea to assign static IP addressess inside the DHCP lease pool...
     
  12. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

    15,153
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    Dec 2, 2010
    Winters,...
    .... if you have a poorly acting router!

    "Bad" is relative. For me, the good outweighs the potential bad.
     
  13. FlyingDiver

    FlyingDiver All Star/Supporter

    193
    1
    Dec 3, 2002
    On the road...
    It's trivial to tell the router to start the DHCP pool at (for example) .100, which will keep it clear of your preferred addresses. So why take a chance?
     
  14. BAHitman

    BAHitman Godfather

    433
    0
    Oct 23, 2007
    Austin Texas
    to me, it's automatic and alomost nobody does it... I can't tell you how many open networks I have been able to use, and how many routers I have been able to log into over the years... especially if you live in an apartment complex...

    checklist on new router

    1. change wireless SSID
    2. set secure password for wireless
    3. set admin paddword
    4. change IP address / subnet mask to non-default value (usually use 192.168.1xx.1 where xx is random digits)
    5. set DHCP scope to .20-200 (gives 71 available static addressess)
    6. if the router lets me, change local web access port from 80 to xxxx and disable external access unless it has SSL
     

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