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Static or DHCP on simple system

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Connected Home' started by wrj, Jan 5, 2013.

  1. Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    :hurah: Heh. You netted the fisherman here. Haven't run across "rep points" but afaik, I am the first one to have talked about it. Thanks for the cool reply!
     
  2. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    If everything works correctly, there is little difference between static IPs, DHCP assigned and reserved DHCP addresses. Once a node is assigned an IP address via DHCP it is unlikely to change unless there is a complete power outage. Even if the router is restarted, most nodes will ask to renew their existing address and so nothing will change.

    If your router is flakey and doesn't manage IPs correctly, I think you'd have bigger problems than just MRV issues. I once had a router with this problem - it would periodically simply stop responding to DHCP requests - and I saw the problem with the PCs and printers on my network before any MRV issues cropped up.

    In the days of TiVo DVRs running TiVoWeb it was convenient to have static IPs so that you knew which IP to use to access a particular DVR. These days, unless you have a specific reason to use static or reserved IPs, I don't see any performance related reasons to not just go with the default of DHCP.
     
  3. lugnutathome

    lugnutathome Hall Of Fame

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    This would be my recommendation as well.

    I've used 2 different routers and just plain old DHCP with no issues running up to 11 DirectTV receivers in addition to multiple PCs, network AV receivers, network connected TV and BluRay appliances with no issues. Max lease time make sure you have enough addresses in your DHCP "span" to accommodate all devices you are connecting.

    If you are running a wireless network from the router as well, make sure you aren't giving out addresses to neighbors;) by securing it.

    I can't help you on routers much unless you've an open budget as my ASUS RT-N66U has come down to appx 160 dollars at Fry's. Not in most peoples budget but worth every cent to me. YMMV. I showed my network admin here at work (whom had sold me on that model ASUS) my iPad's Fing (network application output) and it showed 42 devices and he muttered that it looked like a work output.

    Static addressing should be a last resort as it forces maintenance as your network evolves.

    There was a 10 best routers paper a few months back on AVS Forum You might want to poke around there if you end up looking for new.

    Don "may be just settings or perhaps time for a new router" Bolton

     
  4. Richierich

    Richierich Hall Of Fame

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    In testing and implementation of WHDVR Service there were many many instances where until the User began using Static IP Addresses or Quasi "Static" IP Addresses assigned by DHCP Reservation List there were problems associated with a disconnect from the Router to Nomad.

    After using Static IP Addresses or Quasi "Static" IP Addresses assigned by DHCP Reservation List these Problems disappeared so many here at DBSTALK unanimously prefer Static IP Addresses. :)
     
  5. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    Right you are, but just to keep things in perspective... there may be a million or more WHDVR customers who don't even know how to spell DHCP whose boxes are getting their IP addresses automatically, presumably without issues.
     
  6. Richierich

    Richierich Hall Of Fame

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    Yes, but for those who DO have Problems the Solution seems to be a True or Quasi Static IP Address.
     
  7. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    The ASUS RT-N66U is hands down the BEST router I have used in 18 years of home networking. I've had D-Link, Netgear, Linksys, Buffalo, Motorola and others whose names I don't recall, and the ASUS outperforms all of them. If you haven't done so already, you might want to try Merlin's build of the ASUS firmware. You can read about this build (as well as an independant review of it) at the smallnetbuilder forum.

    PS: You have me beat, we only have 32 devices on our household LAN. :)
     
  8. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Well, my approach in networking is "if it isn't boken, don't fix it." Unless someone has a specific issue with connectivity, I see no reason to reccomend they use static IPs. It is more work, requires more technical expertise, and adds maintenance. For most people, DHCP "just works" and provides "play and play" convenience.
     
  9. br408408

    br408408 Legend

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    I have been using WHDVR since it was first supported. I had problems at first with boxes dropping off so I switched to static IP's, and haven't had a single problem since. I have my computers on DHCP, but like to use static IP's for things like DVR's and printers. Just seems to be less problems (no problems) this way...and I don't see a down side to using static IP's on these devices.
     
  10. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Correct. There is nothing wrong with using DHCP, but as stated there are some that have issues with their receivers renewing the DHCP lease. Switching to DHCP Reservations or Static IP Addresses seems to resolve those issues. As such, I don't necessarily recommend switching unless it seems like the issues presented could be resolved by switching.

    - Merg
     
  11. Steve

    Steve Well-Known Member

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    I could be wrong, but I think in the early days of MRV there were some issues with DHCP lease acquisition and renewal in some folks' setups that DirecTV has long since put to bed. Not unlike the early days of HDMI compatibility. It's probably not easy to come up with an implementation that works with everyone else's hardware on day one.
     
  12. mjm76

    mjm76 Legend

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    I wish that was true but my WHDVR(MRV) works fine as long as I don't have the internet connected. Of course I can not do on demand, but if I connect my internet back the boxes start dropping off and I am having to restart my receivers all the time.

    I have not figured out how to do an infinite lease on my E3000 router yet, which would probably solve the dropping of the boxes in WHDVR setup. I can only do a 7 day lease, not an infinite.

    If anyone knows how to do a infinite lease for my E3000 CISCO router, please let me know.

    Thanks,,, :)
     
  13. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    A common "fix" is to use a static IP outside of the DHCP reserved range.
     
  14. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    +1

    - Merg
     
  15. wrj

    wrj Legend

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    I have a E3000 but I use Tomato firmware. But what you are talking about is possibly a reserved DHCP address. It never changes. But I don't have the linksys firmware loaded to help you. Maybe do a google search. Also, you can do a static ip. You do that on the DVR itself.
     
  16. The Merg

    The Merg 1*

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    Most stock firmwares don't allow an unlimited lease time. DHCP Reservation is not an unlimited lease. It is just a way to tell the router that every time the lease is renewed to use a specific IP address for the specified MAC address.

    - Merg
     
  17. rahlquist

    rahlquist Hall Of Fame

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    Stock Firmware, what is this foreign tongue you speak?
     
  18. wrj

    wrj Legend

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    Thanks for clearing that up. But would static ip help with what was originally asked?
     
  19. veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I don't see any advantage.
    Changing to static is good "when you have problems". ;)
     
  20. wrj

    wrj Legend

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    I'm assuming what is meant that for a E3000, stock firmware is what came with it. That is, the Linksys firmware.

    There are 3rd party firmwares which can replace the original firmware and provide additional functionality. For some Linksys routers, there is Tomato or DD-WRT 3rd party firmwares which can replace the original manufacture's firmware.
     

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