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SWM8 question

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by joannel, Nov 30, 2011.

  1. joannel

    joannel AllStar

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    Sep 18, 2007
    I currently have an HR22-100, Denon receiver, Apple TV and a couple of other things all hooked up behind my tv and the wires are a mess. I currently have an ethernet connection between my router and my Hr22. I have a glass tv stand so it's hard to hide the wires. Am I correct in saying that I could reduce the number of wires by two if I use a SWM8 and purchase the wireless cinema kit. I am not interested in the whole home service. It seems like it would be pretty pricey. Is there any way Directv would supply these now or when the HR34 comes out, will they supply the SWM8 then for nothing.
     
  2. Diana C

    Diana C Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I feel your pain about the cable "rat's nest" that builds up behind an entertainment system. Since it unlikely DirecTV will give you the required equipment at low or no cost without multiple receivers and signing up for whole home, have you considered just making the existing wire neater? A SWM will only eliminate 2 wires anyway.

    Checkout: http://cableorganizer.com/wire-loom/colored.html

    This would pull everything into one thick loom, and you can get it in a color that blends in with the wall color behind the system
     
  3. joannel

    joannel AllStar

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    Sep 18, 2007
    That's a good idea too, but my electrician is going to help me with all of this by installing another outlet behind the tv and attaching a surge protector to the back of the tv itself and lift all of the wires off of the floor. I just thought eliminating two of the wires would help a little. I think you're right in saying DTV wouldn't pay for it though. I may give them a call and see. At least, in the future if I do get an HR34, they may throw in the SWM then.
     
  4. markrogo

    markrogo Godfather

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    Sep 18, 2007
    It's really not worth it to start changing things just to eliminate 2 wires -- lots of work, not much gain. It is almost certainly the case that when you do get the HR34, you'll get to SWM and you should take that opportunity to clean up whatever you can. Having gone through lots of equipment over the last 20 years, that's my .02 worth.
     
  5. John Williams

    John Williams Legend

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    Oct 5, 2011
    I'm guessing you know this electrician and know or trust he knows what he's doing.
    I say this only because around here, an electrician is the LAST person you would call to deal with anything technical. And this is from 20 years and seeing many dozens & dozens of electricians try (key word 'try'). Might as well call a plumber or the lawncare guy.

    Also a note (and why I replied to this post) do NOT!!! mount the surge protector on the back of the TV. That is a very bad idea for a couple of reasons, I'll explain:
    1) The parts in a surge protector, mostly coils and MOV (caps), give off a small EM field when in operation. I have seen this more than once, cause picture problem when placed right next to the circuitry in a TV. For this reason, it's a good idea to keep at least several inches of space between a surge protector and electronic boards that use low voltage (i.e. circuit boards in equipment). You can always test to see if it will cause problems by watching the picture and have someone move the protector around but there is a bigger issue, I'll state below.
    2) It's a surge protector, which means at some point if it gets to do it's job, you'll have thousands of volts rush into the thing to be dissipated. This will generate a huge EM field, damaging to nearby electronics. If the surge protector is mounted right against the back of the TV (or right on top of any circuit board, from any equipment) I guarantee you, 100% without a doubt, it WILL take damage. Surge protector will have done you no good for that peice of equipment it was touching against.

    For an area that never sees lighting strikes, number 2 probably won't be an issue. But around the Southeast US and some places out west, that see a LOT of lighting strikes each year. It could be a real problem.
     
  6. joannel

    joannel AllStar

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    Sep 18, 2007
    Thanks for that info...I hadn't heard that before. I'll probably have him attach it to bottom of the wall and away from any electronics just to be sure.
     
  7. Blurayfan

    Blurayfan Hall Of Fame

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    Another good option is to go the Whole house surge suppressor route, which is connected directly to your main circuit panel. I'm not sure on price though, I've heard anywhere between $75.00 to $400.00.
     
  8. John Williams

    John Williams Legend

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    Oct 5, 2011
    That is a good option as well. Whole house protectors are a first defense to protect the house wiring, appliances, and divert large surges from entering the home on the electrical. But be aware: Whole House protectors are generally blunt protectors, they are NOT meant to replace a 'point of use protector'. They still allow a lot of spike to get thru and don't filter AC much, if at all. Also, they don't disconnect when taking a hit, they only absorb up to what they can take. So you need to keep an eye on the status indicators to know when it's time to replace them.

    'Point of use' protectors usually have tighter tolerances with less surge let-thru. They filter the AC for noise and anomalies. And they generally disconnect power to equipment when hit with a large spike. In other words, they offer higher protection for sensitive electroinc equipment.
    Also: Not all surges and spikes are lighting strikes. The power company has plenty of surges, spikes and sags that come from the plant to your home each day. Also: Not all surges, spikes and sags come from outside your home. Everytime your HVAC starts up, washing machine or dryer start up, Hot water heater kicks on or off, and any number of other high amp and motor driven devices start or stop in your home - a surge and/or sag is created. Depending on the device and the wiring in your home, these can be quite severe. Over time, these can shorten the life of electronic equipment.

    A huge note for everyone:
    If you are buying something that has a label on it 'surge protector' and paying $19.99 for it and think you are actually protecting something - you are a fool. The only thing you are buying is a glorified power strip. There are plenty of good brands out there, but you will never see a descent protector for less than $50 retail ($35-$40 wholesale).
    I generally sell protectors that are in the $100-$200 range. Higher end or larger systems usually get about $300-$1K spent on protection for them. This does not include battery backup systems for projectors, DVR's, computers, etc... Again, I'm in a high lighting strike area of the country, so more is needed than others might need.

    [edit]: Another worthy note:
    If you take a direct lighting strike in your yard or to your house, the EM field created by this is huge. It can generate hundreds (even thousands) of volts of electricity directly into the electrical wiring by itself. Nothing in your house is safe from this, even with the best protectors. This is where home owner's insurance comes in, as you will most likely have massive damage possibly even structural damage.
    It is possible to build a Faraday shield around equipment to protect even against direct strikes but I have yet to see someone do that in residential. Big bucks, time/effort, and aesthetics are usually why.
     

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