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Tark antenna

Discussion in 'HDTV Equipment (Closed Forum)' started by Kenster, May 5, 2002.

  1. Kenster

    Kenster Legend

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    Apr 24, 2002
    Do any of you use a Tark Antenna? I think that's what you call the vhf-uhf antenna that slips around a satellite dish. How well do they work? How do they connect to your tv? Is the reception good enough to keep you from having to pay for your local channels?
     
  2. Scott Greczkowski

    Scott Greczkowski Banned User

    6,968
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    Mar 21, 2002
    Those TERK antennas SUCK. :D

    Only good if you within a few miles of the stations you want to via. If your going to spend that much for an antenna, you might as well buy a real rooftop one with a rotor this way you can tune things in better.

    THe Terks you cant tune them, what you can get is what you can get, If the antenna is not facing the correct way you may be missing a lot of the signals you would get with a regular antenna.
     
  3. Geronimo

    Geronimo Native American Potentate DBSTalk Gold Club

    8,303
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    Mar 23, 2002
    They advertise these as omnidirectional but they really aren't. The reception pattern is an extended oval. So inthat sense they really do have to be pinted the right way. The reservation is here in Northern VA outside DC. My dish is pointed to the southeast bit the OTA towers are to the Northeast. Not exactly optimum reception but I have seen some folks who get by with them.
     
  4. Karl Foster

    Karl Foster Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 23, 2002
    I tried one for about a week, and then subscribed to my locals via D*. Could never get a good picture.
     
  5. Kenster

    Kenster Legend

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    Apr 24, 2002
    I think I'll pass on this antenna. I live in south Houston. My dish will be pointing south - away- from the transmitter towers. Channel 2 is of course weak anyway so aiming the dish mounted Terk away from the transmitter sure won't help. I have a huge antenna in the attic but it doesn't help a great deal. I guess I'll go with D* locals.
     
  6. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

    11,499
    2
    Mar 21, 2002
    Id never get a Terk, my mom wants to get one bug Im trying to talk her out of it, she currently uses those $30 Philips rabbit ears Walmart sells. She tried to tap into my RatShack rooftop but the splitter cut down the signal too much.
     
  7. n1wbd

    n1wbd Mentor

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    Mar 24, 2002
    I used to install TV antennas, for the rural areas I recommend NOTHING LESS than Channel Master antennas especially the Super Color Crossfire series. Also always go with a separate VHF and UHF antenna's much better performance than a VHF/UHF combo. Also get a really good quality mast mounted pre-amp such as Channel Master, Wineguard or for really deep fringe areas Blonder-Tongue 38db gain on uhf and I believe 32 db gain on vhf. Rotor is recommended. And also use good quality RG-6 coax for the main feed coming down from the pre amp. Granted these antennas system are pricey but pay for themselves in the long run by not paying 4.95/month for locals.

    BTW almost forgot for splitter don't use Radio Shack splitters they are garbage too much loss in them pay the extra and get Channel Master. Also forgot to recommend for a UHF antenna ck out the Channel Master Diamond Quantum Series I like the model 4248.

    This system can be the difference between a very poor picture and an very good picture.

    Nobody asked just my opinion from experience. :hi: :D

    Bob Hale
    N1WBD
     
  8. Steve Mehs

    Steve Mehs Hall Of Fame

    11,499
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    Mar 21, 2002
    The splitter we used was worse then a RatShack splitter, it was one of the $2 Philips ones walmart sells. The all cables were RG6
     
  9. Mike500

    Mike500 Hall Of Fame

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    May 10, 2002
    At minimum, in Houston, I'd get the Winegard GS-2000. If you have ghosting problems, as I recall, I'd get the Winegard Ghostkiller HD7210. Since it has a narrow beam and very high front/back ratio, unless your channels are within 30 degrees in one direction, you have to use a rotor. A Channel Master amplifier may also be necessary.

    You have a local dealer in Houston that stocks all of these antennas. It's called Electrotex, as I recall. It is on Fondren near Bagby. I get beautiful results with the 7210, Channel Master and rotor combination here in South Carolina. The two I mentioned are the only ones I install as a professional installer. I also like the Winegard PR8800 for UHF HDTV only applications. Again, it must have a rotor as it is directional.
     

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