1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

The FCC wants input on the National Broadband Plan

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by kfcrosby, Aug 3, 2009.

  1. kfcrosby

    kfcrosby Godfather

    383
    1
    Dec 17, 2006
    Memphis, TN
    Blair Levin, the man in charge of the FCC's national broadband plan, was not impressed with the first round of public input on how best to achieve our national broadband goals. According to Levin, "sloppiness" and the "lack of seriousness and purpose" in most comments were not useful to the agency in formulating a plan, so now we have another chance to impress Mr. Levin. The FCC's new broadband-focused website has listed a slew of public workshops aimed at hashing through various broadband policy issues.
    The FCC intends to conduct staff workshops during August and early September. In the mean time, please suggest topics and questions for the workshops. The goal of the workshops will be to promote an open dialogue between the FCC and key constituents on matters important to the National Broadband Plan. Key constituents will include service providers, equipment providers, applications providers, community groups, and other groups that have a stake in the future of broadband. All meetings will be broadcast over the Internet when possible, and archived for viewing at a later time to ensure that everyone has access to the content.

    The FCC is scheduled to unveil the plan to Congress by February 16, 2010. While the agency has stated that they will use scientifically-sound data in making policy decisions, there is a first time for everything.
     
  2. Ira Lacher

    Ira Lacher Icon

    823
    0
    Apr 24, 2002
    Broadband opportunity is now what electric power opportunity was in the 1930s. The solution was the Tennessee Valley Authority to establish a government presence in an area where private enterprise considered it unprofitable. IMHO the only way the rural areas of this country will get broadband access is if we adopt a plan similar to the TVA. The difference is to keep this in private hands. Under-served areas should be identified and Federal money should be invested with ISPs in those areas to provide service.
     
  3. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    I applaud the public forum for feedback and input into this important initiative, but also cite a failure of leadership to outline perhaps 2 definitive approach models and then use that to clearly debate the pros and cons.

    The FCC has struggled with policy decisions for years, and while this approach is both commendable and "new" to some degree...the input and related decisions have always been heavily "slanted" towards those who reap the greatest monetary gain, as opposed to end users. Until that changes...I have low expectations of the results.
     
  4. smiddy

    smiddy Tain't ogre til its ogre

    15,654
    121
    Apr 5, 2006
    I think what you've produced here goes a long way to why folks haven't been able to impress Mr. Levin, too much cynicism has been introduced without a formidible leadership plan towards the end user's goals. I've been on th efence on a lot of issues here and can't seem to pull myself into a direction that would be helpful if it is going to meet with my work being pushed aside for the better useage of those throwing their monies at it.
     
  5. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    It's called a long time track record...and until somebody shows up to the FCC party with some legitimate leadership, there is no reason to suspect much will change.

    For the FCC to take the position of "please come tell us how we might improve things" is OK, but not as the lead to create new policy. That's a role for feedback once proposed policy is crafted.
     
  6. HDJulie

    HDJulie Icon DBSTalk Club

    883
    1
    Aug 10, 2008
    What is the purpose of this plan -- is it to bring a choice to rural areas? Or something that is "affordable"? Because I can't get DSL or Cable or Wireless where I live but I can get Satellite & as much as I want to do bodily harm to anyone associated with Hughesnet for the crappy, horrible, SLOW service, it is still better than dialup so I keep it. So is Satellite access not available in general in most rural areas?
     
  7. kfcrosby

    kfcrosby Godfather

    383
    1
    Dec 17, 2006
    Memphis, TN
    My understanding is that they are asking for input not only for Rural area's, but also for proposed FIOS (Fiber-Optical-Internet) 100Mb (I personally think we need to go for at LEAST 1Gb by 2012) internet urban systems as well. We're all going to need more bandwidth not just for the applications we know and love today, but for all of the ones that we have not imagined yet.
     
  8. HDJulie

    HDJulie Icon DBSTalk Club

    883
    1
    Aug 10, 2008
    I'd settle for getting at least 1 meg down for what we know & love :). And no cap limits.
     
  9. hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

    32,456
    258
    Jul 28, 2004
    Please note that I am not opposed whatsoever with having this kind of plan...there is a need for it...however, the FCC should be forthcoming in leading and proposing multiple solutions, and then partnering with the technology industry to help determine the best course of action.

    They will likely have little success just expecting others to come to them with all the potential answers.
     

Share This Page