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The GREEN Thread

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Nick, May 4, 2009.

  1. May 7, 2009 #41 of 125
    Richard King

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    I got stuck in an undertow once, but never in an undertone. The problem with restricting one's choices is that one person (with great power) may come along and decide to pass a law restricting what a person can drive. The next person (with great power) may come along and restrict what temperature you can set a thermostat at. The next person (with great power) may come along and decide that you can't eat meat that comes from animals that pass gas. ;) Pretty soon you can't do anything. I would rather make such decisions myself and leave such decisions between me and my wallet (or other deciding factors). Once restrictions are in place, it is rare, if ever, that they are lifted. But then, the average person isn't wise enough to make such decisions, so, we have to leave it to people who are elected by the people who aren't wise enough to make decisions. Hey, I like that line. ;)
     
  2. May 7, 2009 #42 of 125
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Hey, Steve, ole buddy -- lemme buy you a beer! :goodjob:
    I'd say after all these years you and I are overdue!

    Give my regards to Mom. :)
     
  3. May 7, 2009 #43 of 125
    4HiMarks

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    It's fine if someone doesn't want to be environmentally conscious, but to brag about it and go out of their way to harm the environment is taking things a bit too far.
     
  4. May 7, 2009 #44 of 125
    phrelin

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    I don't like being trapped in the undertones either. I think the U.S. could have been a better place if the federal government hadn't subsidized the railroads, built the Panama Canal, and built the interstate highway system.
     
  5. May 7, 2009 #45 of 125
    Richard King

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    Bring back buggy whips. ;)
     
  6. May 7, 2009 #46 of 125
    houskamp

    houskamp Active Member

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    Doing a little now may prevent any forced changes later..
     
  7. May 8, 2009 #47 of 125
    4HiMarks

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    The railroads need more subsidy. Trains in Europe work great. You can go practically anywhere, at any time, quite inexpensively. In this country, train service sucks unless you live on the DC/NY/Bos corridor. I once tried to get a train from Erie, PA to Philadelphia. You can't do it without going out of Pennsylvania. I would have either had to drive 100 miles (in the opposite direction) to Cleveland, or else change trains in NYC. Either way, it would have taken twice as long as driving six hours (mostly) on the PA turnpike by myself. The price was prohibitive as well.
     
  8. May 8, 2009 #48 of 125
    Richard King

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    Passenger rail transportation here is a nearly impossible business. If they charged what they should to break even NO ONE would be on the trains. Amtrak has been losing money since inception. The US and Europe are not comparable simply due to the size of the US. London to Paris is only 211 miles. Erie to Philadelphia is 297 miles.
     
  9. May 8, 2009 #49 of 125
    djlong

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    There you go. For me it's as easy as going to the curb. Well, going to where the curb would be if we had sidewalks :)

    No doubt. But, then, it was 2004 before I even SAW a live deer on the side of the road (and I got my license in 1978). The likelihood of me hitting a deer is pretty remote. Odd since I live in New Hampshire. You'd think I'd see more.

    That's where matters of personal taste come in. My Camry has a better ride than my Intrepid even though it's smaller. Better suspension and less engine noise. I've driven minivans (my ex-wife's choice of ride), some SUV's and even a 23' camper that is sitting next to my driveway. As far as what you can "feel" on the road, I also drove a Lincoln town car for quite some time (inherited form my adoptive mother when she died) and THAT was the 'rolling bedroom' where you couldn't feel the road AT ALL.

    Given all that, my Camry is certainly the best mix of comfort/feel. And I've done some pretty long trips. I've done NH to FL and/or NH to MO in that '02 Camry, the '94 Intrepid, an '89 Olds Toronado Trofeo, a '00 Grand Caravan, '87 Plymouth Voyager, '87 Lincoln Town Car and the 87/88 Fleetwood Jamboree Rallye 23P (huge Ford chassis).

    It was almost amusing driving that camper. You didn't steer it - you gave orders to the helm and called down for more steam!
     
  10. May 18, 2009 #50 of 125
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The...
    (Ed. Note: This is slightly OT but may be of particular interest to our
    readers and, IMO, is sufficiently relevant to include in this thread.)



    TV Show "24" Reduces Its Season Seven Carbon Footprint
    By 43% Through Greener Production Practices


    Hollywood, CA - March 2, 2009 Nearly a year after announcing its aim to reduce its carbon footprint and inspire its viewers to do the same, "24," the Emmy Award-winning series from Imagine and Twentieth Century Fox Television, has far exceeded its carbon-reduction goals and has become the first television production ever to achieve carbon neutrality. Through aggressive and innovative changes in its production practices, the show reduced the carbon emissions associated with its production by a staggering 43%, and to demonstrate a further commitment to leading the television industry on this issue, "24" has purchased high-quality carbon offsets to address its remaining unavoidable emissions.

    How "24" did it:

    - made on-set improvements including replacing incandescent lighting with compact fluorescent lighting wherever possible and encouraging production staff to turn off all electrical equipment when not in use.

    - introduced the use of biodiesel-blended fuels to power generators and production vehicles.

    - ran all on-stage production activities on "green power."

    - purchased electricity from renewable power sources (including a mix of wind, hydro and solar) from outlying areas, thereby reducing overall emissions and pollution in greater Los Angeles.

    - by purchasing renewable energy, FOX was able to reduce the show's overall carbon footprint by nearly 940 metric tons of carbon dioxide.

    - integrated fuel-efficient and low-emission hybrid vehicles into the production fleet.

    - switched to hybrid vehicles to reduce by more than 1,300 gallons, gasoline used during Season Seven.

    - distributed all scripts, schedules and production memoranda electronically, eliminating the need for thousands of pages of hard copies and hundreds of miles driven by delivery services.

    - the show became carbon-neutral by investing in high-quality carbon offsets to address unavoidable production emissions .

    Read the full press release as published in Futon Critic HERE
     
  11. Jun 9, 2009 #51 of 125
    Chris Blount

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    Okay, so I know I said I would not use CFLs but given the advice here and the fact that improvements have been made in CFL technology, I decided to give it another go.

    First, I was very pleased to see that soft white CFLs are available. The bluish color temperature of the light was an issue before but it seems that have solved that problem. I actually like the light the comes out of the soft white CFLs. They look almost exactly like conventional bulbs. So far they look great in our lamps and we are even trying a few of them out in our ceiling fans although I know that they may not last long due to the movement of the fans. Apparently CFLs don't like being moved around while operating.

    I found the globe type CFLs for our bathrooms which seem to work fine.

    I'm still a bit nervous about having them in the house especially after the fire 6 years ago but hopefully that won't happen with the new bulbs. For now we replaced only the lights we use the most.
     
  12. Jun 9, 2009 #52 of 125
    Lee L

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    I have put CFLs in a few ceiling fans and had good results. In fact, I did it because I hoped they would last longer. In my old house, I had a hallway light that was pretty close to the AC unit upstairs and while I never felt any vibration, the bulb burned out all the time. I replaced it with a CFL and never had another problem. SO, it may be that small vibrations are OK and as long as your fan is not too out of balance it wil work well.
     
  13. Jun 9, 2009 #53 of 125
    dodge boy

    dodge boy R.I.P. Chris Henry

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    I recycle my engine oil, Advance Auto takes it for nothing if you have a receipt... I put in a new central air conditioning to replace my old one and a 94% furnace.....
     
  14. Jun 9, 2009 #54 of 125
    Sharkie_Fan

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    I will shortly have all of the bulbs in our home switched over to CFLs!

    90% of the fixtures in our house are halogen - when we remodeled before we moved into this house, the fixtures all got replaced, and it was definitely form over function! Now, here we are many years later, and the desire to be "greener" is there, but primarily, the desire to save money!

    Last week, we found a twist-lock CFL that will replace all but 1 of the halogen bulbs in our house! I haven't found a CFL replacement for that particular bulb, but I'm trying! Problem is it's a 100W Halogen that's REALLY bright, and lights the entire living room (even dimmed to 75%, it's bright). I'm working to find something to go there that's bright enough to light the room and saves a little energy, but I figure our savings will be pretty substantial with 20 something other lights being switched over to CFL (all from Halogen)!
     
  15. Jun 9, 2009 #55 of 125
    jerry downing

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    I have had some supermarket brand CFLs turn to toast and stink up the house. I have since replaced them with GEs which have not given me any trouble. There are CFLs that are made specifically for ceiling fans and we have not had any trouble with them either.
     
  16. Jun 9, 2009 #56 of 125
    Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    I added a screen/storm door to my front door, and a large 220 sf screened-in patio on the back of the house. Now, when the temperature is moderate, I can set the A/C thermostat higher or to 'off' and keep the house open.

    I figure that if I save just $100/yr in electricity, the additions will pay for themselves -- in 45-50 years! :p

    In the meantime, I'm consuming less power and enjoying life more!

    .
     
  17. Jun 10, 2009 #57 of 125
    Richard King

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    I think the smartest thing that I did at the hurricane house (at least energy wise) was when I put in a tankless hot water heater. That thing is GREAT. It's actually American made (made down the road a bit in Miami). A neighbor came through a while ago and said that he didn't believe that it would run all three showers at the same time, so, we wandered through the house and cranked them all up and all went well with the test. I don't know if i would want to run all three plus the dishwasher though. The only problem is that the thing takes 2 40A circuits. If not for that, I would replace the TWO hot water heaters at my house with a couple of these (although I have no idea why I have two hot water heaters). (Maybe I could use one, although the wait time might be significant from the heater to the other end of the house).
     
  18. Jun 10, 2009 #58 of 125
    jclewter79

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    In my experience, the gas tankless water heaters seem to be the best performing ones.
     
  19. Jun 10, 2009 #59 of 125
    BubblePuppy

    BubblePuppy Good night dear Smoke... love you & "got your butt

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    I live in an apt., so there isn't much I can do except for changing light bulbs. I have installed "Satco 13watt NATURAL SUNLIGHT SPECTRUM" bulbs. This bulbs replace 60watt bulbs, and have a light output of 800 lumens/5000k. The light is very good. The one thing that took abit of getting used to is that it takes a minute or less for the bulbs to come up to full output.
     
  20. Jun 10, 2009 #60 of 125
    BubblePuppy

    BubblePuppy Good night dear Smoke... love you & "got your butt

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    Oh, there are a few other things that I do. When using the dish washer I use the shortest wash cycle, and skip the electric drying by opening the dish washer door and let the dishes air dry.
    I use the cold water setting on the clothes washer and the low heat setting on the dryer.

    Of course the main reason I do this is to cut down on my electric and water bill.
     

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