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the new oprah network wants to triple its fee, directtv says no

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Programming' started by blackhawkzone, Dec 11, 2010.

  1. Dec 13, 2010 #61 of 157
    SPACEMAKER

    SPACEMAKER Freethinker

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    I did a little research while on break today:

    Of the 9 women I work with who have DirecTV, 6 of them said they will definitely cancel if they can't get the Oprah channel. 1 said she'd like to cancel but husband wouldn't let her. 2 said they don't care about Oprah. Age of women is 40 to 61 and 5 white, 2 Hispanic and 2 African American.
     
  2. Dec 13, 2010 #62 of 157
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    That's actually a very interesting impromptu survey and results...




    Of course it also shows none of those folks have any taste in TV content. !rolling
     
  3. Dec 13, 2010 #63 of 157
    marquitos2

    marquitos2 Legend

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    I don't care for her show, neither my wife.
     
  4. Dec 13, 2010 #64 of 157
    DogLover

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    I think the fact that Oprah's company is handling the programming is the point. That's why Discovery thinks that this channel is worth 3 times what Discovery Health was worth. Essentially, it is her name that they are selling, in the form of a TV channel.

    It is her name that makes the channel valuable to some, and not valuable to others. (After all, nothing is really known about the programming that will appear.) While I have not interest in the channel, I would think that not carrying the channel would be a mistake for DirecTV.

    Will they will lose the channel altogether if they balk at the 21 cent price? Do they have the option to carry the channel at 7 cents for the 2 years remaining of the contract, and then pay market price after the contract is up? The article wasn't clear on those points. After all, if they paid 7 cents for 2 years, they could pay 35 cents for the next 2 years and break even. (I know accountants will say they are actually ahead, but let's keep it simple.)

    If I had to make a prediction, it would be that after 2 years of being away from a daily TV show, Oprah will not be as valuable a name as it is today. But, that's just one person's opinion. (And one who is not interested in that type of programming anyway.)
     
  5. Dec 13, 2010 #65 of 157
    cjrleimer

    cjrleimer Godfather

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    I think this channel could be a bust depending on what happens early on.
     
  6. Dec 13, 2010 #66 of 157
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I suspect that (regretfully) it would not. Adding her name to anything tends to make it successful, whether or not it's worthy.

    Pricing themselves out of the market, however, could be interesting.
     
  7. Dec 13, 2010 #67 of 157
    mreposter

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    They're pumping a lot of money into stars for the new network, so it's understandable that they want more fees to support the channel. It may not be programming some of us enjoy, but there is a large audience for Oprah, Dr. Phil, Rosie O, etc.

    It's a big gamble on Discovery's part, but if the ratings are strong, they'll get their money.
     
  8. Dec 13, 2010 #68 of 157
    zimm7778

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    That's just it though. If it proves to be a popular channel, then they can ask for what they feel is a fair price. But the station hasn't even started yet. I doubt when ESPN started they asked for a huge price per subscriber. Plus, I really don't think this upstart network has much if any leverage. It's not a channel that's been available and taken away. It's a new network replacing one that will no longer be around. How many people are really going to b*tch about not getting a network like this when they have never even seen it before?
     
  9. Dec 13, 2010 #69 of 157
    SPACEMAKER

    SPACEMAKER Freethinker

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    If you think their taste in TV is bad you should see how they dress. And they keep getting calls from 1984 asking for it's hairstyle back.
     
  10. Dec 13, 2010 #70 of 157
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    Ouch.

    Like I said before...I at least have to respect the fact that lending her name to anything seems to turn things into gold.
     
  11. Dec 14, 2010 #71 of 157
    WebTraveler

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    Not true. We still don't have CSN Northwest here in Oregon/Washington, so we cannot even watch the Trail Blazers on Directv.
     
  12. Dec 14, 2010 #72 of 157
    Paul Secic

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    Dish might carry OWN at first either.
     
  13. Dec 14, 2010 #73 of 157
    Paul Secic

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    The programming probably be women's programs like her Oxygen Channel. Still don't understand why she sold it.
     
  14. Dec 14, 2010 #74 of 157
    Paul Secic

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    Reality light with Dr. Phil. If he goes out of syndication OTA people could subscribe to cable/sat..
     
  15. Dec 14, 2010 #75 of 157
    HarleyD

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    The Oprah "brand" has already peaked. She has announced the end of her daytime show and once she is not on the air daily that brand will begin to shrink. Right now Discovery is trying to get everyone on board at a peak price. DirecTV is wise to hold their ground. That $.21/sub price that they project the channel to be worth is only going to come down as Oprah leaves the air and the draw associated with her name starts to wane as it inevitably will.

    There is no incentive to sign on to pay top dollar for a product that is going to start to diminish very soon. DirecTV is wise not to jump on board with the overly-enthusiastic rate and wait for the market to set a reasonable level.

    This too shall pass.
     
  16. Dec 14, 2010 #76 of 157
    DaveC27

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    It would be interesting to know how many of her fans actually only have Basic Cable anyway :)
     
  17. Dec 15, 2010 #77 of 157
    Paul Secic

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    OWN probably on expanded cable & higher.
     
  18. Dec 21, 2010 #78 of 157
    AntAltMike

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    College...
    - Jerry Seinfeld
     
  19. Dec 21, 2010 #79 of 157
    NewForceFiveFan

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    I've read a lot of the posts on this thread. I've seen a few episodes of Oprah but have never been a rabid fan. Until my cousin reminded me I forgot that Oprah is a very popular person and people listen to what she says and that can make a small business into a successful big business overnight.

    http://www.capecodonline.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100917/NEWS11/100919781

    Just because her syndicated show is coming to an end doesn't mean her legacy will. OWN is simply the next step to reaching a new and larger audience.
     
  20. Dec 21, 2010 #80 of 157
    AntAltMike

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    College...
    But still, no one knows how much her "brand" will serve to carry a network. I've read that as soon as Murder She Wrote ended its run on network TV, the Nielsons of its USA Network reruns tanked.

    For that matter, how valuable is Michael Jordan's endorsement, now that he is no longer playing NBA basketball?
     

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