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Tripod/Unconventional Install.

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by the_antilog, Mar 23, 2009.

  1. the_antilog

    the_antilog Duplicate User (Account Closed)

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Myself and a few of my friends have signed a lease on a house. We get to move in June 1st. We've been looking into what we should do for internet, TV, etc, and have found that our options are limited. Our campus is in a town that is pretty much in the middle of nowhere. The cable service here charges rediculous prices for a fairly mediocre and unstable service. We're all pretty technologically proficient individuals, and have decided the best solution for us is DirecTV. But that is where the problems start....

    Our landlord is very much against us getting a Satellite put on the roof (the ideal place) because she doesnt want "a bunch of holes" drilled into her roof. She also doesn't want new holes drilled into the house to run the coax lines in.

    I have been doing my research and have found that there are FCC laws saying I have rights aas a tenant to have a dish, so long as it doesn't cause any physical damage to the property. So I have been looking into more unconvential methods of mounting a dish.

    I found this tripod on ebay for $29.99 (can't post links yet. still a noob. if you wanna search ebay for "DirecTV Slimline Tripod" you will find it) and it seems like a decent deal. I don't want to spend a ton of money getting this thing mounted. She has also said no to a pole placed in the yard, because it will "ruin the ground".

    So I am asking this forum. What is the best and most cost effective method for getting this dish mounted? Also, what are my options for getting the coax lines into the house without making a new hole in the side of the house. The house is wired for cable, and was wired not too long ago, so I assume RG6 was used. So once the coax is in the house, I don't think there will be any problems.

    Will an installer mount on a pole or tripod for no additional cost, and would they have the problem running coax through a basement window or something?

    Thanks for any help That may come of this. I really love this forum, I've been reading it for about a month now, and have just started posting.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Brannayen

    Brannayen Mentor

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    Sep 7, 2008
    Your best options for the slimline is either a rail mount, or a non-penetrating sled mount. The sled mount might be an additional charge. For cable entry, many techs have flat cables available to them (myself included). These allow cable to enter through a window without drilling any holes. If the tech is permitted access to the outside cable connections, even better, depending of course on where it's located.

    Also there is an organization called OTARD (over the air reception device) that protects people's rights to install satellite TV. If you seem to have an unreasonable landlord, check them out. They can't do anything about a landlord telling you not to put it on the roof or a pole, but a landlord can't tell you that you can't have it period.
     
  3. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    For a renter, OTARD (the FCC's federal regs concerning antennas) only really protects the tenant's ability to have a 1m or smaller dish placed in an area that's exclusive to the tenant (private balcony/patio or something similar). It doesn't require the landlord to allow drilling holes or mounting anything to the building.

    A tripod or non-penetrating roof mount (i.e., sled mount) are both examples of a stand-alone mount that could be used. Nothing need be attached to the building itself. If you're going to use a tripod, I'd recommend mounting it to a piece of plywood, and then putting some cinder blocks or other ballast on top of the plywood to keep it from moving. If the tripod is going into the dirt, the feet can be staked down (some kits come with long metal stakes for this).

    Note that these solutions would generally leave it up to the tenant to bury the cable (if necessary). There are usually solutions for getting cables into rooms, but if the installer can't tack up the cable, he may not run the cable there, because that would fail a QC and he'd get charged back. That might be another area where the tenant has to do the work.

    Expect any of the above mounts to be an extra charge, as they are not free if there is anywhere on the building where line-of-site is possible.
     
  4. putty469

    putty469 Legend

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    Jun 5, 2007
    A sled mount may work well, but a 2" outside diameter pole sunk in a 5-gallon bucket may also work. If you get an SWM capable LNB, you can run one wire into the house or tie into the existing RG-6, and add a splitter inside the house.

    Do make sure if you get high speed Internet through the cable company that you use the flat wire entry mode to avoid tying up the existing cable entry.

    If you'd like more info, tell us how many receivers and/or DVR's you want to install, and where those may be located. That'll help with the great folks in this forum to discuss other options.
     
  5. the_antilog

    the_antilog Duplicate User (Account Closed)

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    Mar 23, 2009
    How do I go about getting a SWM capable LNB? Can something like that be included with the standard installation, or do I need to provide it myself? Are the slimline 3 or 5 LNB dishes SWM capable?

    Also, If roof mounting is not possibl because of my landlord, and they charge extra for mounting on a pole or something, how much extra does it cost to have it not mounted on the roof?
     
  6. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

    8,969
    1
    Nov 13, 2007
    No installer with any experience would mount a Slimline on a bucket mount. You could get away with that for a small dish, but the Slimline is 6 times the weight, more than quadruple the sail area, and requires much more precise alignment.

    As far as the cost of the mount/labor, there's no way to know, as it will depend on what you and the installer can work out, but $60-100 and up is in the ballpark, depending on what's necessary.

    The rules for SWM LNBs are:

    - New customer install
    - No International channels
    - At least 1 HD receiver
    - 5-8 tuners in the system

    Even still, they are subject to availability.
     
  7. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    Here are a few unmentioned optional approaches that may help in your situation.
    * Dishpointer.com...go there and enter the address with zip code. This will give you the line the dish has to point for your installation as a satellite picture.
    * Know that this stuff will work through glass. IF you have an attic window facing your LOS (Line of Sight) the dish can be indoors. The cable will have to be run to the receivers but the exterior considerations are gone. Visualize a heavy wooden picnic table in the living room of an apartment with a dish lag bolted to it.
    * For running cable into buildings the flat coax has been mentioned but has some drawbacks. Additionally....cutting a 4x4 to the width of sash windows and drilling the 4x4 for cable entry allows the window / screen to work. Likewise removing a basement window and replacing it with plywood allows the same holes. These can be replaced upon departure.
    * Pole mounts (2" od pole) and tripods will cost more but will replace attaching to the building.
    *IF the basement (or crawl space) ceiling is not blocked this is how the first floor can be wired. Drill the base board and not the hardwood floor. IF there is wall to wall carpet the space at the perimeter of the rooms, especially the corners can be drilled without damage.
    The rest of the approaches really stretch things........use a window AC unit as a cable run and dish mount, stuff like that.

    Report back with a receiver list and specific problems.

    Good luck,

    Joe
     
  8. the_antilog

    the_antilog Duplicate User (Account Closed)

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Alright, I want all of the recievers to be HD (no DVR). One of them is in the living room which is right above the basement. The other recievers (2 or maybe even 3) are all going on the second story of the house in individual bedrooms. There are cable jacks in all the rooms, so I'm thinking that Once we get the cable run into the house, they can be spliced into the existing wiring. When we move out the following year, will it be as simple as hooking the cables back up to the cable line running into the house, and replacing all the splitters that were previously used to divide the cable system?

    This is all very tricky, because I don't live there yet, so I can't snoop around and see exactly how the house is wired. I am assuming it is all RG6 because it was wired not too long ago. I just don't know if it all collects in the basement, or if there are additional splitters somewherre on the upper level splitting it into the seperate bedrooms.
     
  9. bobnielsen

    bobnielsen Éminence grise

    8,473
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    Jun 29, 2006
    Bainbridge...
    That should work, depending on what the existing wiring actually consists of.

    There is a 2-year commitment required which may be an issue if you are planning on moving again in a year (the person in whose name the account exists could always transfer it to a new location).
     
  10. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Feb 28, 2007
    You are on the right track,

    The splitters will have to be found. Sometimes they are in the wall boxes. Sometimes they are in the attic. There may not be any (home run wire system) where they all go to the same point.

    A trick = look for an old antenna mount........the splitter will probably be in the attic. If there are several (4) cables outside near the electric meter it is probably home runs.

    Joe
     
  11. the_antilog

    the_antilog Duplicate User (Account Closed)

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    Mar 23, 2009
    Well, I just stopped by the house today to see if I could get a look around to find how the place is wired. No one was home, so all i could do was look around outside.

    I found that the cable appears to go into some kind of box on the outside of the house. From there, one line of coax seems to enter the first story of the home, where I assume it gets split to go to the living room and first floor bedroom, and another cable line comes out of the box, runs through a splitter on the outside, then the two resulting lines both enter the house on the second floor. At first, I thought it might be very possible to splice the cable right on the outside of the house. Unfortunately, I was very saddened to see that all of the cable outside appeared to be RG59 :( .

    So my idea of running into the basement appears to be useless, because it doesn't look like the cable collects there, and even if it did, its probably all RG59.

    My new proposal is to run the cable from the dish on a tripod, and then run the individual coax lines to each individual bedroom and living room window (total of 4 windows). I found 8 inch strands of flat RG6 on ebay to run the coax through the individual windows. My question now is, how easy is it to run the coax lines along the siding of a home. I don't think i'll be able to attach anything permanent or "damaging" to the siding. So what are the options for running it along the siding?
     
  12. houskamp

    houskamp New Member

    8,636
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    Sep 14, 2006
    If you can get rg6 from dish to basement area, use SWM and put the PI down there, that rg59 will most likely work fine for the runs..
     

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