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Vinyl record showing resurgence

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Cholly, Jun 9, 2008.

  1. Aug 23, 2008 #81 of 135
    Richard King

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    You are. Young is relative. :D
     
  2. Aug 23, 2008 #82 of 135
    Mike Bertelson

    Mike Bertelson 6EQUJ5 WOW! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    I remember that in the mid-eighties that you could buy a turntable for a buck and a stick of gum.

    Now it's alot more.

    I'd tell you about my albums but Carl would just laugh. :lol:

    Mike
     
  3. Aug 23, 2008 #83 of 135
    barryb

    barryb New Member

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    I realllllly need to get my turntable hooked back up.
     
  4. Aug 24, 2008 #84 of 135
    WERA689

    WERA689 Well-Known Member

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    Wow. I just stumbled across this thread...I don't frequent this forum.
    I'm a big fan of vinyl, and treasure the 4 crates of LP's I managed to wrest from my ex-wife in '81! I have a Denon DP72-L DD table that I bought when I worked for a now defunct local HiFi store, and 2 years ago I added a SOTA Comet BeltDriven table that I found at a used equipment store near Atlanta.
    I completely agree with all the comments about vinyl that I read here, and commend Spock and Richard for their commitment to the format.
    And, Spock, I actually SOLD one of those Nak tables back in the day! Man, those were great days....
    I also bought a Nak ZX-9 cassette deck on accomodation then...the last one Nak had in their warehouse. Still have it, and will NEVER sell it! Also got a great deal then on a Dave Belles Model One amp and DMC preamp that I still have and use daily, and a Perreaux PMF2150B amp that anchors my home theater. Not to mention ADS L1290 floor-standers that are now the front channel speakers in the HT! (Holy crap, I spent a lot on gear back then!) Buying the ADS's is what landed me a job at that store, as I bought them from the store manager, and he was very impressed with me...offered me a job as I wrote the check!
    Thanks for starting this thread, guys...I feel all warm and fuzzy now:joy: :biggthump :goodjob:
     
  5. Aug 24, 2008 #85 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    Welcome to you, WERA689. Thank you for all of your kind remarks. There's a batch of Kool-Aid in the corner. Drink up!

    Those are the sales you never forget.

    When you need it serviced, and you will, send it into Electronic Service Labs in Connecticut. They have both the knowledge and the parts to take care of you. I'm about to send my Dragon cassette deck into them for a re-build.

    Sounds like your story about buying your ZX-9 was similar to mine when I bought my Dragon. This is actually the second Dragon cassette deck I've owned. I bought one, sold it after a year for good money, and replaced it with a ZX-7 that I ended up not liking as much. When I heard the Dragon was being discontinued, I called Nakamichi to order a new one on accommodation, which for those of you who never worked in a stereo store, was well under cost. Specifically, accommodation is when an employee of a stereo store buys pieces directly from the manufacturer for a great price. Accommodation is generally 50% off of retail but I've gotten specific deals that were much greater discounts. Manufacturers would do this for their dealer base in order to sell more to the public. If I owned a Dragon cassette deck, I was more likely to sell one to a customer. It's actually cheap advertising, and many manufacturers still dedicate a good percentage of their advertising budget to financing salesman accommodation pricing.

    Toward the end of Nakamichi USA's existence (mid '90s sometime), things were pretty damn tough. Sales were in the toilet and everyone I knew at the company had either quit or been fired. There was one woman (Jan?) that I still knew in order entry. I called her about buying a Dragon on accommodation. The conversation went something like this.

    Me: Hey, Jan, this is Gregg from Sound World in LaCrosse.
    Jan: Hi.
    Me: I hear the Dragon is finally going away. Got any left?
    Jan: Let me check...(pause)...we have two in the warehouse.
    Me: I'd like to buy one on accommodation. Will you hold one while I send you a check?
    Jan: No problem.
    Me: We're an inactive dealer... (we hadn't ordered in a while)
    Jan: So?
    Me: We're a really inactive dealer...(we probably hadn't ordered anything in a year)
    Jan: SO?
    Me: I'll get the check out to you today.

    Thinks were so bad at the end for Nakamichi USA, I heard that Nakamichi destroyed many Dragon-CT turntables, the one we both love, because they couldn't sell them. To get money, they hired a steamroller and set up the turntables and other products that hadn't sold in the parking lot and rolled over them! :eek2: A US Customs official was there, and when he verified their destruction, Nakamichi could get the import duties back from the government. Cash is cash. I was told this was not an uncommon practice. Mostly it was done to B and C stock goods that had been returned, but at the end, because sales were so bad, it was also done to perfectly good A stock goods, including the last Dragon-CT turntables in the warehouse. :icon_cry:

    Great frakin' speakers from the glory days of a/d/s/. I liked these better than the L1590s. Never sell them, either. They're too big and there are certainly better speakers out there, but what they did right, they did SO extremely right, they are worth hanging onto no matter what. Warm and detailed, with great deep, articulated bass, they had it all covered. And they were relatively efficient, too.
     
  6. Aug 24, 2008 #86 of 135
    Richard King

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    The list of items that I purchased on accomodation would fill this page (well, maybe I exaggerate a little, but it would be quite long). Items that I still use from those days include my Kenwood KD500 turntable with Infinity Black Widow tone arm and AKG cartridge and my JBL 4430 front speakers in my HT system. The turntable is over 30 years old and the JBL's have to be close to that.
     
  7. Aug 24, 2008 #87 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    I remember the Black Widow arm, Richard, as well as your Kenwood 'table. I set up more than a few Black Widows. It tended to like a light, compliant cartridge, but when well matched, it could sound outstanding. I remember the Black Widow and a Sonus Blue Label cartridge was a hot combination and not too expensive.

    That Kenwood of yours was the first turntable with a really heavy base. That quickly became the standard.

    Today, it's back to lighter belt drive turntables on springy bases, which was the norm before your Kenwood. The one thing that's changed are the platters. Everyone used metal platters back then, with rubber or felt mats. Now the standard is thick acrylic platters and no mat.

    As for accommodation, well, let's just say it fueled my stereo habit back in the old days. I'd wait for a killer deal on something, buy it and keep it for the required period of time, usually a year, and sell it for a profit. I'd kick in an extra hundred dollars or two and buy something twice as expensive, keep it for a while and then sell that piece. You could step up to a really expensive stereo this way.

    Good time, good times. :)
     
  8. Aug 24, 2008 #88 of 135
    Richard King

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    ;) I'm on my second pair of 4430's. My boss didn't really like it when I sold my first pair to a customer and then bought another pair, so I stopped the once a year sell/buy program. :lol: I was actually going to buy a pair of 4435's but I didn't have room for them. :lol: http://www.audioheritage.org/html/profiles/jbl/4430-35.htm
     
  9. Aug 24, 2008 #89 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    Nice speaks. I can understand why you didn't get the 4435s. They're huge!

    The deal in my store was you either had to give the store 30% of the selling price if you sold something you owned to a customer (and selling something on the sly was a fireable offense), or sell in on an invoice where more than 50% of the goods on the invoice were products from the store. For example, if I sold a guy a B&O system, but the turntable was from me, I got to keep 100% of what I sold it for. The store would just cut me a check, coded as merchandise purchased. It wasn't income and therefore wasn't taxable. It was a great deal for everyone. The store made a nice sale, I made a nice sale, and the customer got a deal. Win-win-win.
     
  10. Aug 24, 2008 #90 of 135
    Richard King

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    Could you imagine the 4435's in my, at the time, one bedroom apartment in the 4plex that I owned. I think I would have chased away all my renters and damaged the building. :lol: I used an number of 4435's in a design that I did for the IMax theater at the Valleyfair amusement park in Shakoppee. I have no idea if the same system is still there, but they did a great job at the time.
     
  11. Aug 24, 2008 #91 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    I realize you owned the 4-plex, but if I had the right kid in the store, I'd tell him the speakers he was looking at were "lease breakers." That would get 'em every time. [​IMG]
     
  12. Aug 24, 2008 #92 of 135
    WERA689

    WERA689 Well-Known Member

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    I had a Sonus Blue back then, too! And, I found one for sale on Ebay last year---BRAND NEW IN BOX---and snatched that up as quickly as I could! What a quick, natural sounding cartridge, especially for the day! I like it better on acoustic music and vocals than the V15-VMR that is mounted in the Denon! I couldn't believe I found it, as, like A/D/S, Peter Pritchard and Sonus have been long gone.:stickman:
     
  13. Aug 24, 2008 #93 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    Peter Prichard, now there's a name I haven't thought about for years. The first decent cartridge I owned was an ADC XLM (a succession of Pickerings and Shures got me through college), which was a Peter Prichard design.

    Just listed on Audiogon: a NOS (New Old Stock) Sonus Gold Label for $225, here. Need a new cartridge for that Black Widow, Richard? :D
     
  14. Aug 24, 2008 #94 of 135
    Richard King

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    Actually, I do, but you have to come here and rent one of my vacant commercial spaces first. The building is still at only 1/3 occupied since the hurricanes, so the budget for that kind of thing has been slashed until I get more renters. I'm still running my old AKG P8E that I bought at the same time as the table. :( How long do those things last anyway? http://cgi.ebay.ca/AKG-X8E-Top-of-t...ge-Stylus_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQitemZ280233757985
     
  15. Aug 24, 2008 #95 of 135
    WERA689

    WERA689 Well-Known Member

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    Off topic...but
    That looks like an early 70's CB450 in your avatar, Richard...is my bike-eye still good?
     
  16. Aug 24, 2008 #96 of 135
    Richard King

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    Close.... a week old 1972 CB350. That picture was taken in Eastern PA. as I was on my way from Minneapolis to Alexandria, VA to visit my parents. On the trip I ran into the remains of Hurricane Agnes. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Agnes The flooding was so bad that people in Wheeling WV were going from house to house in canoes. The PA turnpike was down to one lane in each direction and it took me 8 hours to put on the last 120 miles. It was an interesting trip, but I sold the MC in Virginia and flew home, totally worn out. :lol:
     
  17. Aug 24, 2008 #97 of 135
    Richard King

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  18. Aug 24, 2008 #98 of 135
    BillP2R

    BillP2R Cool Member

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    I agree with what you all say about vinyl deserving a come back. (In my world, it never left. To me, CDs have been for convenience and use in the car, not for the best sound.)

    Since the Nakamichi tape decks are being discussed, I still have a Nakamichi 581 in my main system. While it was a good deck for recording and playing back the same tape, it was always problematic playing other tapes because the transport runs fast. The schematic shows a speed control pot in the motor circuit, but when I went in to make an adjustment, the pot is not to be found.

    Sorry for the digression.

    --------------- Bill
     
  19. Aug 24, 2008 #99 of 135
    Carl Spock

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    I haven't worked on a Nak 58x series deck for years, but on virtually all decks, the speed control is on the motor itself. If you look on the back of the main drive motor - the 581 is a three motor deck with one for the dual capstans, one for the reel tables and one that turns a cam that moves the head block up and down - you will find a very small access hole. Using an equally small screwdriver, you can turn a pot within the drive motor that will adjust its speed. Be aware this screw only needs to be turned the tiniest amount to change the speed dramatically. It is hard to adjust by ear but it can be done. I've done it. It's a hell of a lot easier to do it with a speed calibration tape, which is generally a 3K test tone, and a frequency counter.

    But that's where your screw is, I'm pretty sure.

    I used to set up a lot of tape decks, so many I bought a Nakamichi T-100 analyzer. Back in my day, I could calibrate a cassette deck within an inch of its life. Bill, you say you live in Wisconsin. Are you close to LaCrosse? That's where I live.
     
  20. Richard King

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    I used to set up REAL tape decks. ;) When I was doing remastering many years ago for the Pickwick label I used to calibrate a couple of Studers B67's, a couple of Ampex ATR-100's and about four Otari MX-5050's. Then I would play with my own Tascam 80-8 and Teac 7300-2T. :) I can't recall ever doing a cassette deck other than a Hitachi that had a self calibrating circuit in it. I still have a half inch MRL test tape sitting around here that hasn't been used in years.
     

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