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War on Drugs-Futile or Necessary?

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Rich, Feb 3, 2011.

  1. Feb 3, 2011 #41 of 165
    spartanstew

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    I'm not going to argue semantics with you, as seems to be your posting style.

    My point still stands.

    The things companies currently test for are illegal. That won't change if other drugs become legal (POINT: they'll no longer test for them).
     
  2. Feb 3, 2011 #42 of 165
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    An absolutely entirely FALSE statement. Not every drug tested for is illegal. Do some more reading instead of just responding.
     
  3. Feb 3, 2011 #43 of 165
    spartanstew

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    Trust me Jimbo, I know just a bit more than you about HR policies and what various companies do and don't test for. I consult with companies every day on these issues (and more).

    What legal drugs are commonly tested for currently?
     
  4. Feb 3, 2011 #44 of 165
    James Long

    James Long Ready for Uplink! Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    #1 Alcohol.

    Your experience may vary ... after all, you're not looking at the same companies.
    Now please, Stewie, let's get back to a professional level.
     
  5. Feb 3, 2011 #45 of 165
    spartanstew

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    I said COMMONLY tested.

    Sure, some companies test for alcohol. I even know of at least one that tests for Nicotine. but they're not common. There's exceptions to every rule.

    The vast majority of companies that do drug testing (which in and of itself is very rare), test solely for illegal substances. That's a fact.

    And if pot were legalized, the vast majority of companies that do drug testing would stop testing for it.

    Will some still? Sure. That was never the point, which for some reason, continues to elude you.
     
  6. Feb 3, 2011 #46 of 165
    Herdfan

    Herdfan Well-Known Member

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    The D.O.T. spec includes ALL opitates, legal and illegal.
     
  7. Feb 3, 2011 #47 of 165
    Rich

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    I read a report quite a while ago that said that if heroin was treated as it is in England, the number of people using would briefly spike and then would settle down to the same percentage of users that we have always had. Apparently the number of users has always been directly proportional to the size of the population.

    40 billion dollars. A year. Think of the good that could be done with that.

    Rich
     
  8. Feb 3, 2011 #48 of 165
    dennisj00

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    Legalizing pot would solve lots of problems -

    - overcrowding of jails / prisons / clogging the judicial system for simple possession and sale. The current States that have legalized 'medical' marijuana have local growers. If legalized, the agricultural industry would eliminate these growers except for the backyard gardeners.

    - reducing the influx of hispanic immigrants who become part of the underground who support the trafficking from Mexico. Around here, a majority of vehicles stopped on the interstates going South are being checked for carrying funds. Going North, they're stopped for carrying the drugs. Local counties benefit from the confiscated counties and buy more patrol cars / hire more cops to stop more while the traffic continues!

    - Mexico and the adjacent states would see a tremendous decrease in violence, killings, and the illicit trafficking of guns. Our gun manufacturers / dealers are probably opposed to this because of reduced sales!

    - Increased revenue to the States from taxes on the growing and sale of the product just like tobacco.
     
  9. Feb 3, 2011 #49 of 165
    Rich

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    Same here. At the moment, I don't know anybody that uses anything, but who knows what people do in the privacy of their homes? I used to walk a few miles a day and sometimes I'd go to a small city close to where I live and there would be streets with sidewalks full of little glass...bottles? I don't know what you'd call them...that I assume contained crack cocaine. I know there are a lot of drug busts in that city.

    Rich
     
  10. Feb 3, 2011 #50 of 165
    Rich

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    The company I used to work for went thru all the proper steps to finally reach the point where they could do random testing. Took them years to reach that point. I went to many meetings that were held by the consulting firm that we used to "educate" our employees about drug use and the upcoming random testing. The company made sure that everyone had plenty of time to get clean.

    The company that did the "educating" was full of young, enthusiastic folks who were absolutely convinced that they had the right approach. It was actually like going to a cult meeting in a tent (we used to go to them a lot when I was in the Navy, lots of pretty girls). The consulting firm was convinced that pot was the "gateway" drug and yet all the data that they used pointed to another source. I finally got tired of listening to all the BS and pointed out that they had firmly convinced me that alcohol was the gateway drug.

    Started a huge argument. But the figures didn't lie. In every case there was evidence of alcohol abuse before any drugs entered the story.

    One of the managers above my pay grade asked me after the meeting, "Why must you always point out where people are wrong? We have to put this program in place and we don't want to have to use a breathalyser every time we call someone in for random tests." In other words, get with the program no matter how wrong it was. Had to keep my mouth shut after that.

    The company ended up buying a breathalyser before they implemented the random testing, so I guess someone heard me. And more people got caught by that than by whizzing in a cup.

    Rich
     
  11. Feb 3, 2011 #51 of 165
    Rich

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    Seems so simple, doesn't it?

    Rich
     
  12. Feb 3, 2011 #52 of 165
    veryoldschool

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    "but" for all the "empires" built for the war on drugs. All of these people would be out of work. ;)
     
  13. Feb 3, 2011 #53 of 165
    Rich

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    We had a couple meetings with union officials and they brought up that point about pot. Turned out that there was/is a "threshold" level for it. Those folks that were caught just under that threshold level were told about it and were tested more frequently. That threshold level didn't have anything to do with their state of intoxication, but it opened the door to closer scrutiny.

    Rich
     
  14. Feb 3, 2011 #54 of 165
    Rich

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    But most of the illegal drugs were legal at one time.

    Rich
     
  15. Feb 3, 2011 #55 of 165
    Rich

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    We did alcohol testing. Everyone who had to whizz in a cup had to use the breathalyser before hitting the head.

    Rich
     
  16. Feb 3, 2011 #56 of 165
    Rich

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    I gotta say this and I should have said it in the gun thread, your posts are so rational it's refreshing.

    Rich
     
  17. Feb 3, 2011 #57 of 165
    Rich

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    Well put. I had hoped we'd avoid the semantics, but...

    Rich
     
  18. Feb 3, 2011 #58 of 165
    tcusta00

    tcusta00 Active Member

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    Legalize, regulate and tax the "softer" drugs and use the revenue to pay down the debt that the war on drugs has contributed to.

    Oxy, meth, etc, should remain illegal for recreational use.
     
  19. Feb 3, 2011 #59 of 165
    Rich

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    Yup, we had to list every medication we took before enduring those tests.

    Rich
     
  20. Feb 3, 2011 #60 of 165
    Rich

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    Yeah, but something else always pops up.

    Rich
     

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