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Water Proofing Connections

Discussion in 'DIRECTV Installation/MDU Discussion' started by kevinturcotte, Dec 8, 2008.

  1. Dec 8, 2008 #1 of 16
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte New Member

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    Outside...
    What's the best way to waterproof coaxial connections outside?
     
  2. Dec 8, 2008 #2 of 16
    curt8403

    curt8403 Hall Of Fame

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    dielectric grease
     
  3. Dec 8, 2008 #3 of 16
    Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

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    Drip loops, wrench tightened connectors.
     
  4. Dec 8, 2008 #4 of 16
    pduggan

    pduggan Cool Member

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    My installer recommended silicone caulking. That's what he used at the cable entrances.

    So far, no problems.
     
  5. Dec 8, 2008 #5 of 16
    BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    That's correct for sealing holes in the wall, but not for sealing the coax connectors themselves.

    Silicone Dielectric Grease is what you want to use. It is non-drying. You squirt a small drop, about half the size of a pea, into the connector before screwing it on.
     
  6. Dec 8, 2008 #6 of 16
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte New Member

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    Outside...
    Where would I get that? Hardware store?
     
  7. Dec 8, 2008 #7 of 16
    Mertzen

    Mertzen Hall Of Fame

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    Most likely not at the major ones. Look for BOSS 440 dielectric compound.
     
  8. Dec 8, 2008 #8 of 16
    say-what

    say-what Active Member

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    solid signal has it
     
  9. Dec 8, 2008 #9 of 16
    curt8403

    curt8403 Hall Of Fame

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    autozone also has it, as they use it on light bulbs in cars/
     
  10. bsprague

    bsprague Legend

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    Feb 24, 2007
    Marine supplies like West Marine and Boaters world have it. Boats get lots of corrosion!
     
  11. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Had to redo every wire nut, bulb, and solderless terminal on my boat. Used good old cable grease.....no problems again..........Should not be relied upon as the only source of birth control or STD protection.

    Don't ask.

    Joe
     
  12. Scott in FL

    Scott in FL Godfather

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    Mar 18, 2008
    I've been using GE II Silicone caulk for over 30 years on my home TV and ham radio connectors, and professional installations at radio/TV broadcast stations and satellite teleports for over 30 years and never had one problem. Some may note that GE II hasn't been around that long... true, and GE II is better than the original.

    Your connections will withstand rain, snow, ice, wind, and remain flexible and sound in extreme heat and cold. The drawback is once you've sealed up a connector it's very difficult (but not impossible) to undo. This is really for truly permanent installations. Make sure your connections are tight and dry before sealing them up. But the stuff is great, and provides mechanical strength as well.

    You've got to use GE II Silicone caulk, not one of the other brands. Clear is best.
     
  13. joe diamond

    joe diamond Hall Of Fame

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    Scott,

    I'm going to get me a tube of that stuff for just-in-case. When I run into sealed fittings (probably GE II) I just cut all the wire and fittings and start over. Sometimes you have to disconnect AND reconnect stuff. Cable grease (dielectric lubricant) works fine for this.

    But sometimes you have to seal an underground cut cable. The correct procedure is to dig it all up. The ok fix is to cut fittings on the damaged ends and barrel them together--then make a puddle of caulk in a plastic bag and jamb the repair into the caulk. GE II will be it fer me.

    Joe
     
  14. Scott in FL

    Scott in FL Godfather

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    Mar 18, 2008
    It's true, opening up a connector sealed this way is very difficult. I've had some luck "splitting" the seal with a razor blade and pealing away the caulk. That works OK for unscrewing an F connector (or an N or UHF connector) but it does leave a mess of cured caulk clinging to everything.

    I did use GE II for an underground cable repair. A radio station had a coax line running underground from a satellite dish and the local utility company found it with their backhoe. I spliced in a new section and covered the barreled splices with GE II. After they cured I re-buried it. That was back in 1990 or so and it still works.

    I've not had the same results with DAP. Stick with GE II.
     
  15. BattleZone

    BattleZone Hall Of Fame

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    For most applications, using a "permanent" solution like GE II isn't warranted or advisable. Technology moves too fast, and things need serviced. Silicone grease will offer the same protection but will allow servicing.
     
  16. pm7600

    pm7600 Cool Member

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    Nov 1, 2008
    I've used a dialectric grease for the inside of the connectors and Coax-Seal for the outside of the connectors. It looks like electrical tape but thicker and soft, and seals around the outside really well.

    My dish is on the heavy rain side of my house, and I've not had any problems so far (5+ years).
     

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