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What are the rules?

Discussion in 'ViP211(411)/211K/222 Support Forum' started by thtmnbhndthecrtn, Aug 3, 2013.

  1. Aug 3, 2013 #1 of 12
    thtmnbhndthecrtn

    thtmnbhndthecrtn New Member

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    Aug 3, 2013
    New Mexico
    I have an underused ViP211 at the house. Pay for it regulary, and installed by Dish. I have a mountain cabin 70 miles from home, former owner had DNW and every thing is there but the receiver. Does Dish consider it "legal" to take it up there on a weekend and use it?
     
  2. Aug 3, 2013 #2 of 12
    jsk

    jsk Icon

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    Dec 27, 2006
    Fallston, MD
    Yes, it is legal provided that you call Dish and change the service location for the weekend and change it back when you return. However, if you own multiple receivers, it wouldn't be legal for you to have one operating at your cabin and another back at your main house (even if it is just DVR'ing shows).
     
  3. Aug 3, 2013 #3 of 12
    thtmnbhndthecrtn

    thtmnbhndthecrtn New Member

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    Aug 3, 2013
    New Mexico
    What if I just take it up there and then bring it back--without calling them up to notify? I do have another at the house, two in fact, one a DVR receiver, and the other another ViP211. I mean, jeez, no body's there using it....
     
  4. Aug 3, 2013 #4 of 12
    Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    The agreement says that you can move to a vacation home and take a receiver as long as you call them to notify... and also as long as no one is at the other location.

    Dish is basically trying to meet you halfway here... consider that if you had cable and wanted to do the same thing, you would absolutely have to be paying for full service at two different locations... so Dish allowing the "snowbird" as long as you call them and don't leave anyone at home is really a good thing in my opinion.
     
  5. Aug 4, 2013 #5 of 12
    jsk

    jsk Icon

    779
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    Dec 27, 2006
    Fallston, MD
    There are a few different reasons for this. One is that they don't want you having an account that has two different service addresses because each service address should be a separate account. Also, the service address affects the locals that you receive and they are required by law to make sure you are receiving the proper locals for your service address. Dish had to give up providing locals for a number of years because they were violating this law and lost a court case.

    Also note that this does not affect the billing address, which will remain the same.

    You just call them up before you leave and call them when you get back. I just verified that you cannot do this online.
     
  6. Aug 4, 2013 #6 of 12
    thtmnbhndthecrtn

    thtmnbhndthecrtn New Member

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    Aug 3, 2013
    New Mexico
    Thanks, both, for your clarification of this....
     
  7. Sep 2, 2013 #7 of 12
    shadough

    shadough Icon

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    Dec 31, 2006
    Per the user agreement, you should call them. Does that mean the dish police will show up when you don't? No. It's the same principle w/ Tailgaiting, but I don't think you hafta call when tailgaiting. So its really up to you. You questing was about the rules and the rules are, to call. 70 miles in New Mexico, probably won't put you out of your DMA so your local should still come in. One thing you'll hafta do, most likely, is run checkswitch when you get there, as chances are that the cabin doesnt have the same dish setup as your home, but who knows, maybe it does.
     
  8. Sep 2, 2013 #8 of 12
    thtmnbhndthecrtn

    thtmnbhndthecrtn New Member

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    Aug 3, 2013
    New Mexico
    Thanks Shad. I get the locals, and I think it must be the same setup. Last time it didnt even go through signal aquisition, just turned right on. Good update.
     
  9. Sep 2, 2013 #9 of 12
    gov

    gov Legend

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    Jan 11, 2013
    "Historically", I've had several clients with very bad luck changing DMAs on a given receiver. Maybe the newer receivers are more tolerant, but for a time I dreaded DMA change service calls.

    (several of my 'snowbird' customers are now too infirm to travel, have decided to stay permanently in Sun City, or, unfortunately, have passed on, so problem for me has abated)
     
  10. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

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    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    What is a "DMA change service call"???

    Is that when the customer can't reliably report where they live and a service person has to call it in on their behalf?
     
  11. gov

    gov Legend

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    Jan 11, 2013
    I've had CSRs totally not understand changing local channel availability when (for instance) elderly customers of mine either take a receiver south for the winter, or in the spring when they bring it back.

    If you have an elderly (not picking on old people, I'm 56 and feel it) person not too up on the jargon call a CSR who is clueless about changing Tucson local channels to Kansas City locals (or vice versa) and a receiver that, for lack of better terminology, does NOT like to have it's local DMA changed, you have a recipe for disaster.

    I've been through it many times, and am used to it. I have also seen receivers working just fine on the new DMA when I leave, and the next morning, I get a call, and it is then either trying to pick up both DMAs, or the wrong one. And I've seen that on E* and D*.

    Not a current issue, but I've had a few DISH receivers, (older models) go 'belly up' after trying to change DMAs and it is really a pain to have a couple of service calls, a frustrated customer, and then a wait for a new receiver, and then get that going. Something that should be 'easy' that takes 3, 4, or 5 service calls can be a real problem.

    I am glad it comes up much less now (other than having some nice older customers pass away).
     
  12. harsh

    harsh Beware the Attack Basset

    21,192
    183
    Jun 14, 2003
    Salem, OR
    You don't have to understand DMAs. You tell them what your new address is and the rest is history.

    Receivers don't care where they came from or where they are as long as the dish they're attached to can see any necessary spot beams and DISH has it configured appropriately.

    It is a little more complicated with DIRECTV as not all dishes can receive all the slots that may be necessary for SD-only locals.
     

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