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What's the Latest on the 921?

Discussion in 'Standard Definition Receiver Support Forum' started by kstevens, Apr 1, 2003.

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  1. Kagato

    Kagato Godfather

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    Jul 1, 2002
    Discovery HD is $7.99/mo and the module is on promo right now for $49. Not that I have any plans of buying either...

    When the 6000 came out it was much cheaper than the D* solutions, even with the OTA module, it was cheaper than the D* STBs. For the most part the 6000 was on the low side of the price scale until this year.

    That being said, yeah, Dish is not the HD leader. In fact no major company seems to be. Just some smaller local outfits here and there.
     
  2. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    Spending the money to buy a HDTV, all this expensive equipment, etc... to watch three or four channels, seems absurd...

    There are hundreds of channels on Dish, and about 1% of them are HD right now.

    Until that problem is fixed, when the 921 arrives is rather moot for 99% of subscribers.

    Jason
     
  3. RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

    16,452
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    Aug 5, 2002
    Dripping...
    I get High Definition programming from CBS (OTA and via DISH), NBC, ABC, WGN (WB) and PBS, plus Fox's 480p wide screen material. Many of these channels also have Dobly Digitl 5.1 audio. From Dish I get Discovery-HD, HBO-HD, WCBS-DT, and some special events, like some NBA-TV high defintion games and I could get Showtime-HD if I wanted to. ESPN-HD is on the air now (waiting for Dish and Disney to grow up), HDNet is on DirecTV (Charlie, wake up and offer this) and Bravo and Cinemax are coming out with HD channels this year. Dish also have the demo channel and a PPV-HD channel. So are you can see there are much more then three or four channels available now with more coming.

    You can get a HD setup going now for what I paid for a Mist 45" RPTV back in 1983, especially when you figure inflation into the picture.
     
  4. tnsprin

    tnsprin Hall Of Fame

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    Mar 15, 2003
    ...
    3. The only advantage E* has over D* in available HD programming is Discovery HD which cost $9.99/mo. and requires a $150 8PSK add-on to the 6000 to watch and from all accounts consists mostly of the same shows being repeated over and over. They also offer east and west coast feeds of CBS-HD, but these are only availabe to a select few.

    ...

    8psk is available throuth 4/30 at $49. I don't know if they still offer it, but they originally offered it free with a years subscription to Discovery HD. It is also currently included if you order a 6000.
     
  5. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    Ok... Eight channels... :D

    That completely misses the point...

    Ok, so a few select channels are HD, so you're going to spend at least a thousand bucks to get those half dozen or so channels, plus the cost of a HDTV?

    I can easily afford to go out and buy a 921 tomorrow (if it was for sale), and I can afford to spend $2K on a new HDTV if I wanted to.

    But why? 95+% of the channels are still in SD, and will be so for some time. Content justifies the hardware, not the other way around.

    Jason
     
  6. jjb

    jjb Guest

    Why? Programming justifies the hardware, not channel count.
     
  7. kstevens

    kstevens Icon

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    Mar 26, 2003
    Attitutes like this would have kept us in the stone age :)


    Ken
     
  8. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    Obviouslly my words are not making my point clear...

    Allow me to try again...

    I'll buy the 921 or something like it, and a nice HDTV, when a reasonable amount of the overall programming is in HD format.

    Until then, the gee-wiz factor is too high, the overall value is too low. Most people agree with this point which is why HDTV sales have not picked up yet in any meaningful way.

    Jason
     
  9. tm22721

    tm22721 Legend

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    Nov 8, 2002
    The only reason I have an HDTV receiver (and Discovery HD) is that it is the only thing that is watchable on my 106" front projection screen. HD movies are, well, 24 fps and unless they are anamorphic they are not as good as true 16:9 HD video.
     
  10. Jabroni

    Jabroni Guest

    I have a true High Definition TV (38 inch RCA tube model) that cost me all of 1400 dollars. This investment along with an antenna attached to my chimney enables me to receive the four major networks along with the PBS station, digitally. Discovery, three HDNet channels, HBO, Showtime and ESPN round out the other HD channels that are available non-OTA with Bravo and Cinemax scheduled soon for debut. The content providers are definetely bringing it so the excuse that there is not enough programming to warrant change is beginning to wear a little thin.

    The way that I personally decide which program to watch is simple. Find the high definitikon program of choice and set the tuner there. Ergo, high definition programming dictates my watching habits and not the overwhelming numbers of channels broadcast in SD. I can choose to watch nearly all the primetime shows now in high def, so that is exaclty what I do. I can watch ABC and CBS movies of the week in high def, so that is what I choose. Then there is the coup de gras, namely high profile sporting events in high def which is exactly what I want to see on the tube. In three hours, I am going to turn to CBS and enjoy about 7 hours of college basketball in beautiful 1080i format with DD 5.1 surround. Next week it is the Masters, then the Stanley Cup, NBA Finals, etc. The hook for me was watching the Masters on CBS about 2 years ago, which made it hard for me to endure regular SD programs.
     
  11. Scott Greczkowski

    Scott Greczkowski Banned User

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    Mar 21, 2002
    If you like the masters you are going to LOVE this next week!

    Dish and DirecTV are both covering the USA Neworks Early Masters coverage in HD! Then over the weekend you will see the Masters in HD on CBS.
     
  12. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003


    Yes the prices have indeed gotten cheaper. That logic falls apart when you consider that my current TV works just fine. Spending $1,400 to replace something that already works requires something more than watching "Friends" in HD.

    And for those who live in apartments? And your 921 can record those broadcasts?

    Not something I'd want to brag about, but ok, to each his own.

    Four channels in HD, you can't record them with your 921, and you get to have yet another antenna on your home.

    I see, so you get less than 10 HD channels, compared to over 150 SD channels? Don't you see what is wrong with that picture?

    You think 5% of the channels being in HD is a lot of "content"?

    I personally think those waving the flag of HD are wearing thin. HD is here, but it isn't ready for primetime. When about 50% of the channels are HD, then the tide will really begin to turn. Some channels don't matter much, such as TV Land which broadcast old shows anyway.

    There is no excuse for channels like FX, CNN, TNN, Disney, MTV, TNT, BBC, SCIFI, etc... to not be in HD.

    So you pick your content based on the technology used to deliver it rather than by the quality of the programming?

    Oh well, I guess that explains the crap on network TV. :D

    Jason
     
  13. Martyva

    Martyva Guest DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Apr 23, 2002
    Have you watched HD?
     
  14. jabroni

    jabroni Guest

    Jason,

    I am not trying to convince you of the virtues or strengths or superiority of high definition television, merely stating my view as a consumer. I personally am sold on HDTV and since the "big three" are leading the way in this migration, I will follow them.

    I subscribe to Dish Network's America's 150 or whatever it is called and I supposedly get around 150 different channels to choose from. Between me and my family of four, we probably watch ten of them regularly with the missus locked onto TLC and "Trading Spaces"! :) Otherwise, the only other stations of value to me are the informational and educational channels. As a consumer, I KNOW what is wrong with that picture. I am paying 62 bucks a month for roughly 10 SD channels. Not exactly a good return on my investment.

    What I should do is go back to the way I received programming in the early '90's, namely by using the monster dish and then purchasing the programming ala carte. I remember paying 30 bucks a year for Disney, as an example. But there again, this is simply not an option for the apartment or residential area dwellers.

    As far as your comment about 50 percent of programming being available in HD in order to make it ready for primetime, I agree. It is gonna be a slow process, but I am one consumer who has already made the leap and I simply do not have the desire to go back!
     
  15. kstevens

    kstevens Icon

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    Mar 26, 2003

    This is the classic chicken or the egg dilemma.
    Don't buy hd equipment because there is no programming, but on the other hand, why develop programming if there is no audience.
    I prefer to live on the edge of technology. It is people like us that keep this planet revolving :)


    Ken
     
  16. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    Yes, and it is damm impressive when done well.

    That being said, even the best quality video is meaningless if I have to watch Married by America or to get it. :D

    Jason
     
  17. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    You don't have to sell me on the quality of HD. I too am sold on it, but I'm not going to spend $2,500 or more to convert my current TV and 721 to a HDTV and 921 until a great deal more content is in HD.

    Oh, I agree... most people do indeed watch about 10 channels. The key is, everyone watches a different set of 10 channels. :)

    Why? You understand that you're not going to watch 150+ channels, you're joining to get the 10 channels you really want.

    You're an early adapter, and that is a good thing, we need those. I used to be one myself, I jumped onto the DVD bandwagon years before most people. I paid $300 each for my pair of DVD players back in 1998. I've put a ton of money being ahead of the game in computers as well.

    I'm just sick of dumping a ton of money into being ahead of the masses, only to figure out after the fact that being ahead didn't get me much.

    When the price gets down into a more reasonable range, and the content picks up to a more reasonable percentage, then I'll jump on the bandwagon and join the HD world. :)

    Jason
     
  18. Hopper27

    Hopper27 AllStar/Supporter

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    Feb 28, 2003
    If the people running the networks and programming providers want to expand the market, they will have to invest in the overall infrastructre to build a market.

    Or just have the Government mandate it, which is not a good solution, but it does work sometimes...

    Jason
     
  19. AkShark

    AkShark Legend

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    Jul 12, 2002
    Dilemma? What Dilemma?:rolleyes: :shrug:
     
  20. jabroni

    jabroni Guest

    Jason,

    Good points all around. The only reason I jumped into the HD foray was peer pressure from a co-worker and the fact that I could get the TV with a built in receiver for 1400 bucks. Otherwise, I would still be watching the programs on my 6 year old, 700 dollar RCA Home Theatre system.

    I could begin to tell you how I jumped into the VCR mix in the early 80's only to opt for Sony's Betamax, but let's not go there. And recently, I took the unit (yes I still have it), to an electronics shop for repair, but they wouldn't touch it. Oh well.............So maybe yer right, wait a little longer for things to shake out and come down in price before buying. The only problem is, the technology constantly changes, ahead of the standards setting organizations. I kinda look at this as a never ending problem. What will be the replacement for the DVD player and will that equipment also have 16 different formats? Sheesh.
     
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