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which tv to buy???

Discussion in 'HDTV Equipment (Closed Forum)' started by anth75, Nov 17, 2004.

  1. anth75

    anth75 Cool Member

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    Nov 15, 2004
    i'm buying a new hdtv this weekend and was hoping someeone can help me out. i want to spend around 1,600.i was looking at Sony 46 in. Projection TV/HDTV Monitor, Hi-Scan 1080i Display or JVC 56 in. HDTV Monitor/Projection TV with Progressive Scan, Widescreen.if anyone could give me some feed back i would apreciate it.thanks
     
  2. deraz

    deraz Daydreamer DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Sep 25, 2004
    My two cents: also take a look at the Toshiba and Mitsubishi sets. They have some great buys in that price range....
     
  3. Ric

    Ric Godfather DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Apr 26, 2002
    I got the Hitachi 51F510 a few weeks ago and love it. Great picture all the way around - especially when expanding standard Definition to widescreen. It goes for about $1500 to $1600.
     
  4. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    What ever you get, make sure it has DVI or HDMI WITH HDCP, otherwise it will be obsolete in no time. I would recomend the Sony, Hitachi and Mitsubishi RPTV lines. Don't go for some low end peice of crap just to save a few bucks. Its worth the extra money to get a better all around HDTV. Visit the AVS forum for all your HDTV needs, there is a high traffic area just for RPTV on that forum and lots od reviews to read.
     
  5. obrienaj

    obrienaj Godfather

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    Apr 7, 2004
    I'm a rookie at this and probably a year away from an HDTV TV purchase, just beginning to tackle the learning curve. Can you explain what DVI and HDMI/HDCP is and why TVs without this capability will be obsolete ?
     
  6. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    yup, Its a new copy protection method. In the future only sets with this input will be able to accept an HD signal. The upcoming HD DVD/BLU-RAY players will be amoung the first to fully implement this, in fact they won't even have component video out. Only DVI/HDMI HDCP rated sets will be able to work with these. Also in the future, the HD providers will start to copy protect (flag) HD programs, when this appears on a program everyone using component will be down-rezzed to SDTV (480p), anyone using an HDCP connection will be able to see the full 720p/1080i/1080p HDTV picture. This is the basic understanding on what the future holds for component and DVI/HDMI.
     
  7. Stewart Vernon

    Stewart Vernon Roving Reporter Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Jan 7, 2005
    Kittrell, NC
    I second the motion for Toshiba. Both of my TVs are Toshiba... My non-HD one is a 32" that I've had for longer than I can remember (10 years or so I believe)... My HD one is their 65" model from a couple of years back.

    I'm a little concerned over the DVI vs Component discussions I've heard since my TV just slightly predates having that connector as standard (it existed then, but wasn't a gimme item)... but I can't believe there wouldn't be some viable workaround.

    Anyway, look at Toshiba... mine have proven to be durable over the long haul.
     
  8. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    Again, there is no work around for non-HDCP supported sets. My best advice is to get rid of outdated HDTV's with no HDCP input before them become EDTV's, and obsolete.
     
  9. digital223

    digital223 Legend

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    Dec 18, 2002
    I notice most of your posts include " make sure it has DVI or HDMI with HDCP".
    I thought HDCP is only being considered for adoption when HDTV is finally ready to go full steam! There are othe formats besides HDCP.
    Can you elaborate on your findings. Personally I don't think HDCP will be adopted, I certainaly hope not. From what I have found out it will prevent anyone from recording any programming to a dvr. But I do not think it will prevent anyone from viewing HDTV. Please correct me if I am wrong.
     
  10. ibglowin

    ibglowin Godfather/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Sep 10, 2002
    This is utter nonsense.

    There are more HDTV's in homes today with nothing but component inputs on the back for HDTV than DVI, or HDMI sets combined. Down rezzing component HD is nothing more than an urban legend. IT WILL NEVER HAPPEN. There is NO recorder of any type on the market that has a component input on it that accepts anything more than a 480i signal anyway.

    HDTV tuners out there today don't even have anything that would detect a broadcast flag anyway so they would just ignore it and pass the signal through anyway unchanged.

    Bottom line, buy the set with the best PQ. If it has HDMI input great but don't lose sleep over it if it doesn't.


     
  11. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    HDCP ALREADY exists, its in use on almost ever single HD cable box on the market, and its heading into the satellite industry. If your DVI port doesn't accept HDCP you can't use it, plain and simple. The down-rezzing hasn't started yet, but we know for sure it is coming.
     
  12. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    Its the truth, I know you don't like it but that is what is going to happen. We already see in the HD DVD/Blu-Ray players which will NOT even feature component outputs. Use DVI or HDMI HDCP or you don't watch HD DVD's in HD. Plain and simple. It will happen, and if you have a non-HDCP enabled set its time to sell it, before it become totally obsolete. Its better to be safe then sorry, here it just makes no sense to not be ready. Most people who have component only sets won't care, because 85% of them don't even know what HD is. They think analog cable is HD.
     
  13. ibglowin

    ibglowin Godfather/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Sep 10, 2002
    You know what the sky is falling also, look out the window , I swear it is, really, no really it is.

    You are 100% wrong here. They will never mess with analog. (i.e component HD) Hollywood doesn't care about analog, only digital because of the fear of perfect copies. That said there are plenty of HD sets and receivers out there that will never know or care about a broadcast flag. The FCC has already stated that No OTA HD can carry ANY broadcast flag. The only thing that may carry a broadcast flag in the future is HD PPV and first run stuff on HBO etc.

    Really, the sky is falling.....

     
  14. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    Then why would the FCC require that all HD STB (for OTA too) made after July of this year to SUPPORT the broadcast flag, if it is going to go how you say?
    I find this rather interesting, taken from the FCC's website:
    "The essence of the FCC's rule is in 47 CFR 73.9002(b) and the following sections: "No party shall sell or distribute in interstate commerce a Covered Demodulator Product that does not comply with the Demodulator Compliance Requirements and Demodulator Robustness Requirements."

    The Demodulator Compliance Requirements insist that all HDTV demodulators must listen for the flag (or assume it to be present in all signals). Flagged content must be output only to "protected outputs" or in degraded form: through analog outputs or digital outputs with visual resolution of 720x480 pixels or less--less than 1/4 of HDTV's capability. Flagged content may be recorded only by "Authorized" methods, which may include tethering of recordings to a single device.
    The Demodulator Robustness Requirements are particularly troubling for open-source developers. In order to prevent users from gaining access to the full digital signal, the FCC ties the hands of even sophisticated users and developers. Devices must be "robust" against user access or modifications that permit access to the full digital stream. Since open-source drivers are by design user-modifiable, a PC tuner card with open-source drivers would not be "robust." It's not even clear that binary-only drivers would qualify.

    Together, these rules mean that future PVR developers will have to get permission from the FCC and/or Hollywood before building high-definition versions of the TiVo. The products that they do build will be epoxied against user experimentation and future improvement. The rules mean that open-source developers and hobbyists will be shut out of the HDTV loop altogether.

    Read some more about it: http://www.cdt.org/copyright/broadcastflag/introduction.shtml
    http://www.cdt.org/copyright/broadcastflag/

    Is the sky really falling??? It must be in the world of non-HDCP supported HDTV's, because being obsolete is closer then you think. :)
     
  15. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    Apr 23, 2002
    The...
    Several posts in this thread assert that HDCP will render earlier HD connectivity protocols such as DVI and Component obsolete. The assertion is incorrect. Current HDTV sets will NOT be rendered obsolete by HDCP.

    - mod
     
  16. pomeroy

    pomeroy Legend

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    Jan 2, 2005
    Great advice!! I will make sure my HD set will have HDCP before I buy it. You know its always the people that jump on board to early that end up getting burned and pissed off because they just wasted there money :sure:

    About programs being Flaged it makes sence, I knew it was to good to be true, they will find one way or the other to screw everybody over with HD.

    Curious as to how the HD-DVD/Blu-Ray Recorders will combat this?

    By the way whats your take on the winning format? HD-DVD or Blu-Ray? :)
     
  17. mini1

    mini1 Icon

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    Jan 25, 2004
    Exactly. I think we will see both HD DVD and Blu Ray do well. Blue Ray should have a slight advantage, but its going to be like DVD+ and DVD- in the end.
     

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