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Why doesn't my hard drive show how big it really is?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by n8dagr8, Jun 28, 2005.

  1. n8dagr8

    n8dagr8 Resident Rounder DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Yeah, I can't wait to see some of the responses.

    Anywho....after some misunderstanding with Dell, I now have a "160" GB and a "250" GB hard drive.

    My question: Why do they only show 145 and 230 respectively? Not that 375GB is not enough, I'm using all of 18GB. I'm just curious why it does this? I know it has something to do with a partitioning of the HDD but other than that, well, no clue. Thanks,
     
  2. Bogy

    Bogy Hall Of Fame

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    It's the spyware stealing 35 gig of your drives. :)
     
  3. RichW

    RichW Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    It's simply a matter of two different scales of measurement. Drive manufacturers express disk sizes where a Gigabyte is 1 Billion bytes (a decimal system). However most disk utilities report sizes where a gigabyte is 1,073,724,841 bytes (sometimes referred to as a "binary" GB. -- so the size reported is actually smaller. 160 Gb in decimal is about 149 Gb in the "binary system". Your actual space is further reduced by the FAT, FAT32, or NTFS file directory. It is even more reduced if you have small files that don't fill up the minimum sector size. Don't worry though, you have plenty of space for now. :)
     
  4. n8dagr8

    n8dagr8 Resident Rounder DBSTalk Gold Club

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    I knew it! :D
     
  5. TNGTony

    TNGTony Hall Of Fame

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    Rich is probably correct. hard drive manufactures say 1000 bytes is a Kilibyte. 1000 Kilobytes is a Megabyte. 1000 Megabytes is a gigabyte. 1,000,000,000 bytes = 1 gigabyte.

    Just about everyone else on the plannet says 1024 bytes in a Kilobyte. 1024 Kilobytes in a Megabyte. 1024 megabytes in a gigabyte. I get 1,073,741,824 bytes = 1 Gigabyte as is reported by just about everyone else.

    HOWEVER some Dells (factory setting) use a hidden partition as a system restore drive. This could be taking up some space as well.

    See ya
    Tony
     
  6. Mark Holtz

    Mark Holtz Day Sleeper DBSTalk Club

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    Hard drive math.

    To the hard drive manufacturers:
    1KB = 1,000^1 bytes
    1MB = 1,000^2 bytes
    1GB = 1,000^3 bytes

    To the actual computer:
    1KB = 1,024^1 bytes
    1MB = 1,024^2 bytes
    1GB = 1,024^3 bytes

    Thus, your 250GB hard drive has at least 250,000,000,000 bytes of space available, but is really 230GB.

    Don't you just love binary math?
     
  7. Bogy

    Bogy Hall Of Fame

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    Rich is of course correct, but mine was funnier. :) And I couldn't remember the figures as listed above. :D
     
  8. Jacob S

    Jacob S Hall Of Fame

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    One should not wait until their hard drive is that close to full before doing something about it anyways and should look into backing up some or all of the data and/or getting another hard drive.
     
  9. RichW

    RichW Hall Of Fame/Supporter DBSTalk Gold Club

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    Another explanation is that Microsoft takes 10% of the drive space as an agent's commission. :)
     

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