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Will we ever be able to share content between two HR-20's in our own homes?

Discussion in 'DIRECTV HD DVR/Receiver Discussion' started by Kash76, Jul 9, 2007.

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  1. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    What is an HR20P?
     
  2. Michael D'Angelo

    Michael D'Angelo Lifetime Achiever

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  3. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Amazing how far we've come since last Fall in our appreciation of the HR20.
     
  4. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    At last, an objective view. I was waiting for someone with actual experience to speak up. I see how it works now. Is this a wireless hook-up or wired?

    Be a whole lot simpler to unplug an eSATA and plug it into another HR20 in another room. Just requires unplugging and plugging two wires (power and SATA), and a quick reboot of the HR20. 5 minutes. And you have access to a whole hard drive, not just a program. The eSATA port is active, all we need is a quick "divorce" of the "marriage" of eSATA to it's own HR20.

    I have to say, in a jocular way, adding more things for the HR20 to do does not give me a warm fuzzy feeling. The four I have are working perfectly right now and I would hate to see them corrupted by a "not ready for prime time" software update. And let's face it, D* is perfectly capable of doing just that. Think of what we all went thru last fall.
     
  5. kitchj

    kitchj Godfather

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    I would imagine that this is due to them using a usb 11mbps wireless hookup. With the current implementation on the HR20, it would either have to be a cable (100Mb) or a bridge (If you went N, you will have peaked out the network ports 100Mb). Even with my current G bridge (54Mb), I should be able to do real time streaming of MPEG4 files.
     
  6. Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Give an old sailor a break and restate the above in "layman's" terms, would you please? Sounds like you know what you are talking about and it is just a little hard for me comprehend what you mean by some of the terms. If I read your post correctly, the transfer of info would be virtually instantaneous and you would be able to record very quickly?

    Is a G "bridge" the same as a G router?
     
  7. Sirshagg

    Sirshagg Hall Of Fame

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    I've used Tivo's MRV with standalones and hacked D units. They were always connected to wired networks. In general they transferred programs a bit faster than real time. I would start the transfer on a 1 hour show, wait about 5-7 minutes and then start watching it. I would have no problems watching normally (even fast forwarding through commersials).
     
  8. kitchj

    kitchj Godfather

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    The Tivo's used a USB wireless adapter. They were (are?) limited to a 802.11b (explained later). This was limited to an 11Mb transfer rate.

    A "normal" hardwired network cable will be 100Mb (many are now 1000Mb).

    Since the HR-20 has a "normal" network port, you will have to hardwire into your 100Mb or 1000Mb network. That is at least 10x faster than the TiVo connection had.

    If you really want to be wireless, you can use a "bridge" (a lot of people are using Network Gaming Adapters which are just bridges with a few other things built in). This will have the "normal" network port plug into it, and it will then transmit wirelessly to your wireless router. This could be an 802.11b (11Mb), 802.11g (54Mb), or 802.11n (108Mb - Please note that it would still be limited to 100Mb because of the actual port) bridge. N has not yet been fully standardized, so I still recommend G. Even with G, you are getting 5x the speed that the TiVos got.

    54Mb is more than sufficient to transfer 1 sec of video in 1 sec. Therefore, you should be able to watch with no buffering wait time.

    Hopefully I didn't make this more confusing. :grin:
     
  9. kitchj

    kitchj Godfather

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    Just as a follow up.... I just ran across this article about ABC streaming HD video. If they can stream it over the internet, we can stream it on our networks! (talking about speed here, not legal-wise :p)

    http://www.tvtechnology.com/pages/s.0082/t.6413.html
     
  10. lucky13

    lucky13 New Member

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    Just a quick vote for MRV.
    It's my most anticipated feature, above VOD, DLB and other acronyms.
    Would solve the ESATA portability problem (as has been mentioned earlier), and could/should allow you to play ESATA recordings when hooked up to a different DVR on your account.

    And, as has also been said before, will cause me to buy more HR20s. One for every room.

    Maybe even (with SWM) the bathroom. :lol:
     
  11. Sirshagg

    Sirshagg Hall Of Fame

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    Please be sure to make it official with the wish list survey. I really can't believe this item isn't dark green.
     
  12. lucky13

    lucky13 New Member

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    Already voted, but thank for the reminder!
     
  13. DocTauri

    DocTauri Legend

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    It's all about how you do it. In my house, I have GigE on the Tivos, and can transfer a 30 min. sitcom in less than 3 min.

    Even 100MB is extremely usable, you friend is probably using some old USB 1.1 wireless (i.e. Linksys) adapters. Those absolutely sucked.

    Doc
     
  14. 4DThinker

    4DThinker Godfather

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    Does 10/100 have enough bandwidth for HD content? I know I can play DVD (SD) media over my home network, buy HD-DVD media chokes.

    Are the ethernet jacks on the HR20s 10/100 or 10/100/1000?
    MPEG4 may compress the content enough for 10/100, but is the content stored on a HR20 still mpeg4 or is that only it's signal compression from the satellites?

    Just wondering.
     
  15. Sirshagg

    Sirshagg Hall Of Fame

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    ooops
     
  16. Sirshagg

    Sirshagg Hall Of Fame

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    I don't know about the rest but the content is stored in whatever format it is received in. If it's sent by D as mpeg4 that's how it's saved on the HD.

    I'd be rather surprised if the network port on the HR20 will do 1000.
     
  17. Ken S

    Ken S RIP

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    is it 10 or is it 100? :)

    10 should although overhead would make this iffy.

    100 even with most overhead will.

    The bigger question is can the HR20 support this. There could be a situation where the HR20 is recording two shows and then someone tries to access a 3rd program from the box. I'm not sure the HR20 would be able to handle this smoothly.
     
  18. Sirshagg

    Sirshagg Hall Of Fame

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    I would imagine someoune would have to go to great effort to get a network component that is ONLY 10 these days.
     
  19. sdub

    sdub Mentor

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    100MBps should be plenty for HD... it's enough for an Mpeg2 transport stream, and MPEG4 is only smaller.

    The HD Home Run does exactly that... it's an OTA ATSC tuner that transports the bitstream over 100Mbit ethernet.

    http://www.silicondust.com/wiki/products/hdhomerun
     
  20. Tubaman-Z

    Tubaman-Z Godfather

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    I would hope the HR20 can. My old hacked DirecTiVos would record 2 programs, show a 3rd, and stream a 4th over my home LAN (100 Mb) without stuttering. (Full disclosure: Yeah, I admit it. I'm a fan of hacked DirecTivos who is in withdrawal and transition to HD. HD is doing a good job of helping me to kick my previous habit :) )
     
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