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Will Your ISP Spank You?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by SayWhat?, Feb 26, 2013.

  1. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    The Big Five have started implementation of Six Strikes, but I haven't seen specifically what constitutes a violation.

    What do the RIAA/MPAA/BSA racketeers want your ISP to spank you for? Who else is involved in the conspiracy to close the web?
     
  2. Davenlr

    Davenlr Geek til I die

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    I got one of these last week from Comcast. Just use peer block. It gets most of the snoops.
     
  3. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    From what I've seen, if it truly is how it works, it's actually not that bad. It looks like it concentrates on torrents, etc. If they detect your IP downloading protected content, your ISP sends you an alert, after several violations, you go up in level, up to bandwidth throttling etc.

    If they stop the Jammie Thomas, $25k per song type thing, its a step in the right direction.

    This would also get around the issue of someone stealing someone else's wifi to use. There are people that may not even realize they have wifi, let alone wide open. I've seen that before.
     
  4. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    But that's the point. What is 'protected content'? If you look at the rules of most websites, even boards like this one, there is usually some language about ownership. If you copy someone's post from here, is that a spankworthy violation?

    BSA has been attacking people for years over things that most don't consider violations.

    If someone uses the web to copy a song they bought from Amazon from one PC they own to another PC they own (say home to vacation home), is that spankworthy? What about PC to Mobile where you''re using two different ISPs?

    What about Slinging content?


    Get around it? They'll attack the the account holder even if they are completely innocent (short of not securing their access).
     
  5. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    Seems to me an obvious solution: Don't steal copyrighted material online and you have nothing to worry about.
     
  6. dettxw

    dettxw MRVing

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    Guilty until proven innocent.
    Is this a great country or what?

    In the new system, users will be directed to a landing page after receiving five to six warnings. That page will require them to contact their internet providers or respond to some educational materials.

    Before their Internet access is restricted, users do have the option of requesting an independent review, at a cost of $35.

    "At least when you go to court, there is a question of due process," she told TheWrap. "They have created their own private law system here where consumers don't have the protection normally afforded the accused. It's really quite dangerous."
     
  7. WestDC

    WestDC DIRECTV A-Team DBSTalk Club

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    I hope so- I like to be spanked!
     
  8. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I'm hoping it's limited to things like sharing torrents. Might be off base, but that's my hope and is the way they make it sound.
     
  9. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Kind of like the IRS.
     
  10. 4HiMarks

    4HiMarks Hall Of Fame

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    They won't reveal exactly how, but VUDU uses P2P distributed content sharing technology similar to bittorrent to stream rented movies. Is your ISP's sniffing software going to be sophisticated enough to tell the difference?
     
  11. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    You're missing the point. Look at the bottom of this page:

    Similar language is on nearly every website out there. Major search engines serve up images so that you don't even have to go to the host website.


    Depending on interpretation, this could turn into a free-for-all.

    Couple this with efforts like those in Illinois and other states and countries to ban anonymous posting IDs.
     
  12. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    You can go as far as the warnings on baseball and football games. Going literally by what they say, you can't talk about the game afterward without written permission. A guy actually tried to get permission, but didn't get very far.
     
  13. klang

    klang Hall Of Fame

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    I would support banning anonymous ID's. Might make the internet a more pleasant place to visit if everyone had to be responsible for what they post.

    They are after people downloading illegal copies of movies, music and software. The rest seems is paranoia.
     
  14. SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    Not me. That's just one (of many) reasons why I don't do Fakebook. Nobody on the web, anywhere, knows my name. Short of merchants I shop at that is.
     
  15. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    I got one of those from Comcast as well. They said I had downloaded a movie illegally. I never heard of the movie. When I discussed this with them, they thought I had been hacked. My security is so tight that it would be impossible to hack in.
     
  16. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    I wouldn't say impossible, but at least much more trouble than it's worth. I generally tell people, you'll be safe from the run of the mill hacker, but I make no warranty against the NSA or Mossad.

    As for banning anonymous handles, no way. I don't want to have to convince someone that a post was by someone else with my name and not me. A handle is a bit different. However, I do note that the one that says he'd be in support uses the name klang :)

    I'm all for the mod's here being more in the open.
     
  17. jerry downing

    jerry downing Godfather

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    If the NSA or Mossad wanted to hack in to download a soft core porn movie, I'm sure that they could. That is not likely since there are networks in my area with no security whatsoever. I'm sure that they would attack them first.
    The first time this happened, my security was quite weak. My security is much stronger and my network is invisible to anyone except those who are supposed to see it.
    My other thought is that someone in my family downloaded the movie but no one will own up to it
     
  18. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Not saying this is how it was done, but a hidden SSID is very easy to see. It also is possible to hack into a WPA2 encrypted network without ever having to crack the passcode. And this is possible on most routers by default as part of the Wifi spec (a broken required feature).
     
  19. djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

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    From the descriptions I heard, it's the torrents they're going after. Those are transmitted with a particular protocol. If I had to take a stab at how it's being done, I'd say the steps involved would include:

    - Create an agency that targets pirated files, maybe the Copyright Holders Oversight Administration System, or C.H.A.O.S. for short.
    - CHAOS finds a copyrighted file on a shared torrent site (Say, a copy of "The Avengers")
    - CHAOS records information about that file (packet signatures, IP address of the host, etc)
    - Subscribing ISPs use CHAOS software to get "signatures" of 'The Avengers' in their databases
    - ISPs use CHAOS-customized packet sniffing software to match packets to the signature
    - ISP sends out warning letter
     
  20. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    This is C.H.A.O.S! We don't sniff here!

    Yes, I know it's spelled with a K but couldn't resist.
     

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