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Windows 8 - Any first hand experiences?

Discussion in 'Tech Talk - Gadgets, Gizmos and Technology' started by wilbur_the_goose, Oct 26, 2012.

  1. Nov 6, 2012 #101 of 130
    dpeters11

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    I'll try that, just need to plug in a wired mouse. Windows is hard to use without a mouse, or now a touch screen.
     
  2. Nov 7, 2012 #102 of 130
    Mustang Dave

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    Windows 8 is absolutely horrible. We installed at work today to start testing it out. Having two desktop screens (Start screen and sort of the old desktop screen) is completely redicolous. From a business user perspective, heck from any perspective, this OS is dead in the water based on the complexity of use. Next OS please...(with one main desktop)....
     
  3. Nov 7, 2012 #103 of 130
    dpeters11

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    I do agree from a corporate standpoint, though server 2012 may be different. A lot of companies are still working on upgrading to 7.

    I used to think 8 was a disaster from a home use perspective, but I'm changing my mind actually using it. 7 is still my favorite, but 8 is no ME.
     
  4. Nov 7, 2012 #104 of 130
    Drew2k

    Drew2k New Member

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    I have a Microsoft account and used that when I configured Wndows 8, and I also have a different Xbox account. Today I decided to try Xbox Smart Glass on Windows 8, but I was logged in with my Windows 8 account and it said if I wanted to use my Xbox account, sign out of Windows 8, create a new local account, and then sign back in. What??? Everything is already configured under my Windows 8 account, I should start over with a new account?

    So I said, no, I don't want to do that, and just logged in with my existing Microsoft account I was using for Win8. It then created a stupid new Xbox account with no other information and told me I have exactly one chance to change the stupid name it gave me. Worst of all, it is using this same stupid new Xbox account for the Music app, the Video app, etc.

    I don't want to use this stupid new Xbox app name and can't find a way to get rid of it now.

    Stupid.

    Stupid.

    Stupid.
     
  5. Nov 7, 2012 #105 of 130
    kevinturcotte

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    I have to admit, I AM curious to play with it, before I give it a final judgement. Is there anyway I can download it and try it out for like 30 days?
     
  6. Nov 7, 2012 #106 of 130
    kevinturcotte

    kevinturcotte Active Member

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    A sledgehammer should take care of the problem lol ;)
     
  7. Nov 8, 2012 #107 of 130
    dpeters11

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  8. Nov 9, 2012 #108 of 130
    wilbur_the_goose

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    I think it's great for home use on a PC you use for dbstalk.com, facebook, twitter, e-mail, etc.

    And there are apps where a touch-screen tablet will work great.

    But for most of us, it's doomed for the workplace.
     
  9. dpeters11

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    Well, Sinofsky is out, effective immediately. Julie Larson-Green is in charge of all future development.
     
  10. heathramos

    heathramos Legend

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    well our VP at work wants an ultrabook so I just ordered the 32bit and 64bit versions of Windows 8 Professional so I can test it running our standard software on a typical desktop.

    don't want to have to support an ultrabook without at least playing with Windows 8 here at work behind a proxy running our apps.

    we'll see how well it works.
     
  11. dpeters11

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    If at all possible, I'd start just looking at moving over to 64 bit, using 32 bit apps where needed.

    There was a discussion when we were moving to Windows 7 whether to stay 32, and I ended up telling them that they really didn't have a choice, that the system had to at least be 64 bit compatible.
     
  12. heathramos

    heathramos Legend

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    I have just started playing with windows 8 and I was wondering why people are dead set against it from a business perspective?

    The learning curve will be pretty steep for the average user, for sure but I'm betting it will be functional.

    Uninstall all apps that require a microsoft account, block access to the windows store at the firewall, pin typical apps to the start menu, help users place shortcuts to apps/websites/folders to the start menu and make sure they can print. Certain people will complain like crazy about the interface and I wouldn't choose to go to this in general but so far I haven't found a show stopper. I haven't started testing engineering apps, however. I also haven't started looking at group policy settings that directly affect Windows 8 PCs. I was able to install apps from the windows store logged on to the domain and using a microsoft account without syncing but I had to run a command because I'm behind a proxy server.

    There are things I don't like, however. A metro app closes differently and can do the uneven split screen but standard apps just go to the desktop and open like they normally would (including having an X to close the app). I really think that is just sloppy. The interface should act the same no matter what kind of app you are opening. But hey...that's just me whining. It would also be nice if metro apps like mail and calendar linked to an Exchange Server and not just to hotmail.

    I will continue to play with it next week.
     
  13. Kung

    Kung Cool Member

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    Having spent a month or two with it, I feel I'm pretty qualified in saying that it's because it's not quite ready.

    The move from Windows Vista to 7 was, for me, largely noneventful. Not so for 7 to 8. While it's a noticeable speed increase, I've seen two or three BSOD's, multiple update failures, and so on.
     
  14. dpeters11

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    From a business perspective, many companies are just now upgrading from XP to 7. They have apps that may not be compatible with the OS or require sites that aren't ie 10 compatible. I'd se them upgrading domain controllers and file servers before client systems.
     
  15. djlong

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    You answered your own question. Why should a company pay more money to Microsoft in upgrade fees only to have to pay MORE money to wrap a box around WIndows 8, RE-train users and THEN have something their people don't want.

    All downside, no upside, and costs more.
     
  16. dpeters11

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    Windows 8 does have benefits, just not enough especially since they are still just going to 7 in many cases. Server 2012 is definitely going to be different.
     
  17. Getteau

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    As djlong said, you answered your own question. For < 10 or 20 users, what you described may work. However, multiply your steps by 5000, 10,000, 20,000 + desktops and you'll see why no one has any real desire to roll this out.
     
  18. Dec 3, 2012 #118 of 130
    satcrazy

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    Great...
    IMO.
    7 will be the new XP.

    [ remember the XP to Vista transition? Right.] There are still many companies running XP because it works, and they are tired of paying the high cost of OS roullette.

    8 is geared towards the teckies and home use.
     
  19. Dec 3, 2012 #119 of 130
    Shades228

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    I think Metro UI gives more functionality faster after 10 minutes of changing what's pinned. I think that 90% of the complaints would be gone if My Computer, Control Panel, and Search were pinned by default.

    If you make the UI work for you it's very good. If you try to fight it the whole time it's just going to get frustrating like most things.
     
  20. Dec 4, 2012 #120 of 130
    djlong

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    The Metro/Modern/OopsWeForgotToTrademarkSomething UI is far better suited for tables and phones, slightly less so for touch screen PCs and horrible for someone with lots of applications that they use - like a developer.

    My Win 7 taskbar has one-button immediate access to the entire Office suite (Word, Excel, Access, Powerpoint, OneNote, Outlook), Chrome, Visual Studio 2010, SQL Server Management, UltraEdit, UltraCompare, iTunes and a few other utilities while NOT blocking the background wallpaper that I customized. What's worse is that, after installing Win 8 on a spare laptop and using the "Win+D" to get to the desktop I discovered the Start Button really WAS gone - even from the desktop ($5 got me a replacement: Start8)

    I honestly don't know what MS was smoking. Not when they made Metro - that's not the bad thing - but making it so that you HAD to boot to Metro and could NOT have the desktop by default. This does NOT pass what I call "The Mommy Test".
     

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