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Winterizing your Direct TV dish

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by rob316, Oct 30, 2008.

  1. Nov 1, 2008 #61 of 114
    SatNoob

    SatNoob Legend

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    Aug 16, 2007
    I put a cover on my dish and never had any problems, live in Michigan and get a lot of snow too. Never lost signal all last winter, snow slides off to each side on my cover it doesn't accumulate.
     
  2. Nov 2, 2008 #62 of 114
    nickg2

    nickg2 AllStar

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    Nov 27, 2005
    fortunately my dish is on a ground level pole and not roof mounted, so i can easily go out and brush the snow off the dish if need be. good thing is i very seldom ever had to do that!
     
  3. Nov 2, 2008 #63 of 114
    firefighter4evr

    firefighter4evr Legend

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    Sep 17, 2008
    hell, just attach a extra vibrator to your dish and shake the ice and snow off.....


    im kidding of course:lol:
     
  4. Nov 5, 2008 #64 of 114
    piper28

    piper28 Cool Member

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    Sep 18, 2007
    I've had snow stick a couple of times to the dish. Unfortunately, that dish in question was on the top of the two story part of the house, with no way to get to it. So I'd go out in the middle of the snow storm and take the garden hose with a sprayer on it, and aim up at the dish. It was generally just barely in range. Never had any problems with ice buildup from doing that.

    Snow generally only sticks to my dish when it's very wet, and the wind is coming from just the right direction. The 5-lnb dish was mounted in a more sensible place so I could get to it :).
     
  5. Nov 5, 2008 #65 of 114
    curt8403

    curt8403 Hall Of Fame

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    Dec 27, 2007

    no spray, try a dish heater...
     
  6. Nov 6, 2008 #66 of 114
    Ryan415689

    Ryan415689 Mentor

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    Oct 7, 2008
    I heard pam is a bad idea because it sticks to the dish and leaves a really bad film on it.
     
  7. Nov 6, 2008 #67 of 114
    DJTheC

    DJTheC AllStar

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    Oct 31, 2007
    Oh no, that stuff attracts bees when it gets warmer. Always a good suprise to see a comb or a nest on the dish or in the arm.:mad:
     
  8. Nov 6, 2008 #68 of 114
    gfrang

    gfrang Hall Of Fame

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    Aug 29, 2007
    I use spray silicone on dish and plastic on lnb. Staw away form oily stuff like wd40 pam because they attract dirt. I dont know why automotive paste wax wont work i just never tried it. That's all i need if my neighbors see me past waxing my dish they will think i really lost it.
     
  9. Nov 6, 2008 #69 of 114
    Piratefan98

    Piratefan98 Icon

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    Mar 11, 2008
    I think DirecTV signal will pass through clear plexiglass, so that's why I'm investing in a plexiglass roofing system for my dish.

    [​IMG]


    Yes, the start-up costs are a little high, but the costs of continually buying more and more cans of Pam or WD-40 will be saved by this one-time investment.

    Jeff
     
  10. Nov 6, 2008 #70 of 114
    curt8403

    curt8403 Hall Of Fame

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    Dec 27, 2007
    You could always build a nice fancy Bird house to house your dish, but then you would have a problem in the spring with either Robins or Sparrows (Jack) trying to build a nest
     
  11. Nov 6, 2008 #71 of 114
    iamqnow

    iamqnow Legend

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    Dec 26, 2007
    I was SO prepared for my first winter with a "dish." Made up a contraption with my pool brush extension handle and a soft paint brush. Never needed it. In south NJ, right on the coast, even though it snowed, nothing ever stuck to the dish. I guess further north, snow build up on the roof itself could actually be an issue.
     
  12. Nov 6, 2008 #72 of 114
    jackpot

    jackpot Cool Member

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    Mar 3, 2007
    a glass of hot water
     
  13. Nov 6, 2008 #73 of 114
    Shades228

    Shades228 DaBears

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    Mar 18, 2008
    Ices back up so you would need a lot of glasses and water. Then you'd have to clean all the glasses out of your gutter in the spring.
     
  14. Nov 6, 2008 #74 of 114
    veryoldschool

    veryoldschool Lifetime Achiever Staff Member Super Moderator DBSTalk Club

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    Dec 9, 2006
    [DOH] you're not supposed to throw the glass at the dish. :lol:
     
  15. Nov 6, 2008 #75 of 114
    curt8403

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    Dec 27, 2007

    that reminds me...

    Rodney was to attend a ceremony, where he was to be made a knight. Rodney was very nervous, but his friend told it was easy and not to worry.
    "You only have to do 4 things....
    1. You Salute the Flag
    2. You curse the Enemy
    3. You Toast the King
    and 4. Dash your glass in the fireplace."

    A week later Rodney's friend asked him how it went. Rodney answered, "Rather Terrible, I have been banished from the kingdom, never to return on pain of death."

    What on earth happened? his friend asked.

    Rodney replied "I got confused and got things out of order.
    I cursed the flag, Toasted the Enemy, Saluted my glass, and then dashed the King in the fireplace"
     
  16. Nov 6, 2008 #76 of 114
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    Jan 29, 2008
    when it -15 and the wind is blowing all the snow on the ground into the dish, you do NOT want to start throwing hot water around :)
     
  17. Nov 6, 2008 #77 of 114
    curt8403

    curt8403 Hall Of Fame

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    Dec 27, 2007
    molotov cocktail perhaps?
     
  18. Nov 6, 2008 #78 of 114
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    Jan 29, 2008
    lol, while the snow would clear the cracking of lnb would still be an issue :)
    did that to my 3 lnb oval dish 2 years ago.
     
  19. Nov 7, 2008 #79 of 114
    HDinCincy

    HDinCincy New Member

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    Sep 4, 2008
    There are several "pet safe" antifreezes. I cannot vouch as to their total safety. A couple other ideas... small hair dryer on the end of a long pole, or maybe a leaf blower (assuming it's not the wet, heavy stuff.)
     
  20. Nov 7, 2008 #80 of 114
    David MacLeod

    David MacLeod New Member

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    Jan 29, 2008
    I'm all set, the IcexII works great. 1 application each fall.
    but again, most people don't have it and do not want to spend $200+ a quart.
    I got lucky and got some for free when we closed the base.
     

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