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Writers Strike Discussion Thread

Discussion in 'TV Show Talk' started by Bionic Squirrel, Nov 3, 2007.

  1. Nov 12, 2007 #81 of 387
    Mark Holtz

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    As I see things, there will be some shows that will go on hiatus by the end of November. The rest have enough episode in the can to show during February sweeps. That means that we will see repeats and specials during December and January.

    Now, if the strike continues through February, then pilot season is essentially ruined. If it continues through April (about the same length as the 1988 strike), then May sweeps is ruined. And, I am not expecting a quick resolution.
     
  2. Nov 12, 2007 #82 of 387
    phrelin

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    Take a good look at the credits for quarterlife. These people aren't amatures, and it is being filmed for HD. The Hollywood Reporter reported Friday that because of the strike NBC is trying to buy the series, so we may get to see it on NBC HD.

    However, watching it on MySpace TV was a drag. Tomorrow I'm going to watch the episode from quarterlife.com which has a higher resolution option - it looks like widescreen SD on my 42" plasma which only has an SVGA input for the computer (its a 4 year old Panasonic).

    I'm going to have to go somewhere else to see what it does using a DVI level output.
     
  3. Nov 12, 2007 #83 of 387
    Rich

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    That's true, but they still belong to the union. Just as actors belong to the same union and act in movies where they could be cosidered independent contractors or the ever popular "consultant".
     
  4. Nov 12, 2007 #84 of 387
    Rich

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    When I teach at a college and develop a new course, the course, and accompanying literature or hardware or software becomes the property of the college. I do this as a "consultant" and sign a contract that stipulates that they own any work I produce.
     
  5. Nov 12, 2007 #85 of 387
    Sirshagg

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    But if they turned around and started making a fortune off this content you created wouln't you be looking for a better deal on the next contract you agree to with them?
     
  6. Nov 12, 2007 #86 of 387
    Ken S

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    The writers would probably agree to not getting residuals, but when they asked for that originally the studios decided they would rather pay them less and then give them a piece of future sales. So, writers now get a very small piece from DVD/VHS sales (.04/copy).

    This was the system the studios wanted. I'm sure if they said...let's just negotiate a larger up front payment and no residuals based on sales they could work something out.

    The movie and music industry have a long and filthy history of not paying talent.

    Rich, of course you can assign your rights to another party. That would be part of the deal you negotiate with them.
     
  7. Nov 12, 2007 #87 of 387
    Rich

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  8. Nov 12, 2007 #88 of 387
    Sirshagg

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    +1
     
  9. Nov 12, 2007 #89 of 387
    Rich

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    That happened to me. I developed a course on "Electrical Shock". We could not find a ready made course so I had to write the whole thing myself and presented it as an eight hour seminar. Won an award for it. Couldn't make the award ceremony (didn't want to go, seemed too much like work) and that aggravated my boss to the point that she had another instructor give the seminars using my material.

    Was I upset? No. It was right in my contract that they could do that as soon as I presented the finished work to them. I read the contract thoroughly and signed the same contract every time I taught a course, wrote a test, or developed a course. To look for something more after the fact would have seemed dishonorable.

    From what I have read in the NYC papers, the writer's biggest problem is the new forms of technology that they never realized was coming. No body's fault but their own.
     
  10. Nov 12, 2007 #90 of 387
    Rich

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  11. Nov 12, 2007 #91 of 387
    Steve Mehs

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    The 21st century way to say 'I concur' or 'I agree'.
     
  12. Nov 12, 2007 #92 of 387
    Rich

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  13. Nov 12, 2007 #93 of 387
    Nick

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    The...
    +1 means the writer acknowledges your IQ is probably not in the negative. :lol:
     
  14. Nov 12, 2007 #94 of 387
    Rich

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    Thanx, I kept thinking it meant "me too" and couldn't understand why it wasn't "me2". Clears that up nicely. Now if I can just remember that...
     
  15. Nov 12, 2007 #95 of 387
    Rich

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    Disagreements? A chance to learn. Is there such a thing as a negative IQ?

    I like the "I concur" better.

    Glad to see someone remembered us today. I think I'll change my sig to fit the day too.
     
  16. Nov 12, 2007 #96 of 387
    Steve Mehs

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    For quoting text the code is
     
  17. Nov 12, 2007 #97 of 387
    Nick

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    The...
    Manhole covers are round because, with a "lip", it's the only shape that can't
    be dropped down through the hole. The shapes of early covers were square,
    triangular, rectangular and even oval, and pranksters had a field day dropping
    them down through the hole, causing many picket-walking striking writers to
    fall through, often with severe injuries or even death.
     
  18. Nov 12, 2007 #98 of 387
    Rich

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    Everything you said is correct. But there is a simpler answer.

    Just reread your answer and you did get the simpler answer. A larger circle can never fit into a smaller circle and each manhole rests on a smaller "lip" that is smaller than the manhole. No amount of twisting or turning will allow the manhole cover to fall into the hole.
     
  19. Nov 12, 2007 #99 of 387
    Sirshagg

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    And in this case the font size meant it's a big plus 1 (I REALLY agree) :D
     
  20. phrelin

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    That's everyone's biggest problem, as the Screen Actors Guild and the Directors Guild both have contracts that expire in June 2008, and both are focused on this issue.

    And what's coming is a very big problem. The Guardian reported Sunday that Google is in discussions with Simon Fuller, the British entrepreneur behind American Idol and the Spice Girls, about a joint venture that could change the way TV is watched over the internet.

    (No, I promised I won't do another long rant. I just blog it to save anyone from having to read it.)
     

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