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Yellow Dot Program

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Drucifer, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    This idea seems to be taking off across the nation.

    [​IMG]

    The above sticker goes on the vehicle driver's side rear window and if you're in an accident, the first emergency personnel to arrive know where to find you health info.
     
  2. BattleScott

    BattleScott Hall Of Fame

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    I guess the more chances you give them to spot the info the better, but the bracelets seem like the best idea to me. It's always there no matter where you are.
     
  3. MysteryMan

    MysteryMan Well-Known Member DBSTalk Club

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    That will only work if the vehicle's owner is driving. I agree with BattleScott, bracelets are a better idea.
     
  4. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    I have basic med info on my cell as my first emergency 'ICE' entry. My cell is always with me.

    Tho' I prefer not to advertise to the world, I think the yellow dot idea needs more explanation here.
     
  5. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Here's an article about it from Alabama. It's not implemented everywhere. I think it's in Cincinnati (though I've never heard it talked about), but a statewide program hasn't been passed by the Legislature, it's been stuck in committee since August.

    http://adeca.alabama.gov/C15/YellowDot/default.aspx
     
  6. BattleScott

    BattleScott Hall Of Fame

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    What would seem most important to me is that there be ONE place where emergency responders are trained to check as a specific part of their process. The more places the info "might" be would just add confusion, IMO.

    In that regard I think the bracelet is the best option. Since it is physically attached to the person, it is the best way to ensure the info is available in every situation.
     
  7. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    With this, they are supposed to look in the glove box.

    I use a Road ID when we're biking, but am not good at wearing it all the time.
     
  8. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Twenty plus states have some type of Yellow Dot Program. And there are many areas, outside of these states that have started their own Yellow Dot Program.

    Bracelets are nice for those that like to wear jewelry. I don't. Had a bad accident because of one as a kid.
     
  9. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Having been a police and/or fire first responder well over half of my adult life, I am concerned about the information here.

    Bracelet's are the most reliable primary method of informing first responders of chronic conditions, allergies, etc., and pointing emergency responders and medical personnel to other information. See here.

    Here's the "Yellow Dot" description:

    "Participants of the program receive a “Yellow Dot” decal, a “Yellow Dot” folder and an information form with the participant’s name, an identifying photo, emergency contact information, personal physicians’ information, medical conditions, recent surgeries, allergies and medications being used."

    Yes, the yellow dot program gives far more info than can be crammed onto a bracelet that looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    On the other hand, maybe this development might prove to be better in the long run:

    [​IMG]

    If you carry a cell phone, as Nick noted the address book entry using the ICE (in case of emergency) heading also can provide additional information, particularly if you have a bracelet which refers emergency personnel to your cell phone.

    The ICE thing got to be a chain email thing with a lot of misinformation and problems. You can read about this at Snopes which also contains info provided on the Los Angeles Fire Department web site which in part reads:
    But keep in mind that these "more info" schemes are all variations on a wallet card. I don't have my cell phone on me everywhere. But I do carry detailed info in my wallet. It would be better if I had a bracelet or necklace that includes mention of the wallet card.

    Again the bracelet is the most reliable primary method of informing first responders. Keep in mind that:
    • Damage to or loss of cell phones in an emergency response situation is a problem.
    • The Yellow Dot envelope is fine except when someone drags you out of your car just before it burns up, goes downstream in the raging creek, or completes its fall over the cliff. And it's only good if you are in your car.
    • The USB drive thing is not waterproof and can be damaged in other ways.
    • If you are mugged for your wallet, only your assailant will have access to your medical info card.
    Also there was a recent story that a recent survey indicates that less than 25% of adults in California have done anything regarding end-of-life wishes. Those who have legal documents including a "Do Not Resuscitate order" should have "DNR" stamped on that bracelet, listed on the wallet card, entered somehow into that cell phone, etc.
     
  10. djlong

    djlong Hall Of Fame

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    With smartphones being more and more intelligent these days, more and more people are locking them - especially iPhones. First responders wouldn't be able to get into the phone at all.

    And I certainly wouldn't put a DNR on a bracelet. While I don't want to live on life-support forever, I certainly would want to be resuscitated at the scene of an accident! If, later on, after plenty of diagnosis, they determine I'm not going to get better - THEN pull the plug! :)
     
  11. dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Of all the solutions, it seems something like the Interactive Road ID is the most flexible. I don't have this version, but might consider it. It doesn't give much info on the ID itself, you can only customize 2-3 lines, but it allows a doctor or first responder to call an 800 number or access a web page that has the info that you provide, and is updatable.

    Wallet card certainly helps, but there's still only so much you can put there.
     
  12. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    The obvious long-term solution is for everyone to have a microchip containing a complete, life-long health history implanted in each person's body in an easy-to-access location, such as the left shoulder. They (?) would commence chip inoculations with newborns, and for seniors in, or first entering a retirement program such as SS, teachers or railroad pension plans.

    This is inevitable.
     
  13. Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    Like the idea, but as you age the data needs to be frequently updated. So it would need to be WiFi. Unless you want to make the belly button a real plug receptor.
     
  14. Nick

    Nick Retired, part-time PITA DBSTalk Club

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    I've already provided for that. Updates would be done locally and wirelessly via encrypted close-contact, induction methodology, by a medical professional, pharmacist or other "authorized" person.
     
  15. phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    I've debated that issue in my mind a number of times. Given that I screw around with electricity I know that a shock could stop my heart without necessarily being fatal if CPR is administered soon enough.

    But the problem is ... if they get you going again, "after plenty of diagnosis ... then pull the plug" isn't always quite as easy or clear cut as one might think, no matter how clear you think your legal documents are.

    If I were young, not in my 13th year after a quintuple bypass and a 2-year prostate cancer survivor, I probably would agree with you. But if you see me along the road, don't start CPR please.;)
     

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