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You are too old if you remember...

Discussion in 'The OT' started by Mark Holtz, Sep 14, 2013.

  1. Sep 15, 2013 #61 of 368
    Drucifer

    Drucifer Well-Known Member

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    NY Hudson...
    Anyone remember those foot x-ray machine that were in some shoe stores in the early '50s?
     
  2. Sep 15, 2013 #62 of 368
    Laxguy

    Laxguy Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense.

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    Winters,...
    Yes, it was fun.... until we learned it could be detrimental.

    And: Taking light bulbs into the electric company office, they'd test them, and if dead, give you a new one free....
     
  3. Sep 15, 2013 #63 of 368
    SayWhat?

    SayWhat? Know Nothing

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    NOTHING Christmas related in any store until the day after Thanksgiving, and then BAM, they all went Norman Rockwell.
     
  4. Sep 15, 2013 #64 of 368
    Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    The first postwar TV's I saw were 7 inch sets made by Hallicrafters and Motorola.
    I bought my first TV in 1949 or 1950. It was in a large wooden tabletop cabinet and had a 12 inch round picture tube, The display format was known as a truncated circle, in that the horizontal size took up the full width, and the vertical size was 3/4 the horizontal size (Naturally). My Dad and I used to sit together, watching Pro Wrestling, either from Rainbow Arena or Marigold Arena. I'd sneak back ito the room where the TV was located after my folks went to bed to watch "Broadway Open House".

    As to color TV, The FCC initially awarded color broadcasting rights to CBS for their field sequential TV system. The National Television Standards Committee (NTSC) protested, offering instead the system developed by RCA (dot sequential), and won, largely because the CBS system was not compatible with existing black and white TV's, while the NTSC system was. The first regularly scheduled color program I saw was the old Arthur Godfrey show.

    Who among you remembers the old style toasters that had 2 flip down doors on opposite sides? They toasted one side of two slices at a time, then the bread had to be turned to toast the other side.

    No home was complete without at least one Big Ben windup alarm clock.

    I learned to drive in my uncle's 1938 Hudson Terraplane, which had both manual and electric shift.

    I recall going to the old Apollo theater (Wikipedia says it was the McVickers, not the Apollo) in Chicago to see Cinerama for the first time. The show was introduced by Lowell Thomas, who talked about existing black & white film format and sound, then announcing, "And This is Cinerama", whereupon the curtains opened the full width of the theater and you were engulfed on a roller coaster ride, accompanied by multichannel surround sound. It was quite an awesome experience at the time.
     
  5. Sep 16, 2013 #65 of 368
    phrelin

    phrelin Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    Yeah, I remember the toasters and Cinerama and.....

    As I noted elsewhere awhile back, this kind of discussion feels wierd as I have gotten older.

    My parents were born when nobody had electricity, phones, or automobiles. Air travel was for the birds, literally.

    My grandchildren have never seen a time without home computers or cell phones. There's a car or two or three at every home. My youngest son flies from D.C. to the Bay Area to see his daughter at least once a month (and sometimes sees his mother and I, sometimes, grumble, grumble).

    That granddaughter's other grandmother (her mother's mother) died this month. She was 80, i believe. Her generation, my generation, grew up with an experience of the increasing ubiquitousness of electricity, phones, extensive home entertainment equipment, automobiles, air travel, etc.

    My dad's world didn't end up with everyone having a personal flying machine - but it did end up with everyone having refrigerators. And he did live to see the time when we had computers in our home.

    Remembering "the good old days" was never his thing nor will it ever be mine.Everyday American life changed radically in the lifespan of two generations. While I won't laconically say as our oldest son does "it's all good", for the most part it certainly hasn't been bad ... particularly the refrigerators.
     
  6. Sep 16, 2013 #66 of 368
    markfp

    markfp Legend

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    First VCR I ever had was a Betamax. Can't remember the year, but it might have been the second one. Bought it at Sears and it must have weighed about 40 pounds, (no kidding).As I recall I paid about $700 for it. (I payed less for some cars back then) That thing was built like a tank. After I moved on to something better, I gave it to a co-worker and between the two of us it must have run for almost 20 years. Tapes cost $16-$20 around.here. I found a place in NYC that sold them for about nine bucks if you bought a case so a buddy and I use to split one now and then and thought we were just great.
     
  7. Sep 16, 2013 #67 of 368
    lparsons21

    lparsons21 Hall Of Fame

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    We were talking the other day about what our grandparents had seen in their youth and later in life.

    It occurred to me as we were talking that my grandfather talked about the Oklahoma Land Rush and his participation in it, and then I thought that same man also got to see a man on the moon!

    Just seems amazing to me what just one lifetime can see.
     
  8. Sep 16, 2013 #68 of 368
    dmspen

    dmspen Hall Of Fame DBSTalk Club

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    We were poking around in our work basement and ran across an old tube amplifier. I remember my Dad and I testing the TV tubes at Walgreens.
     
  9. Sep 16, 2013 #69 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Sadly, I can remember my parents and grandparents having to pick up the phone and give the operator the number. No dial, certainly no pushbuttons.

    Rich
     
  10. Sep 16, 2013 #70 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I had a lot of people look at that set and nobody could find out where that squeal was coming from. I'm not really sure it was an oscillator squeal, that's what I was told by several repairmen who couldn't fix it.

    Rich
     
  11. Sep 16, 2013 #71 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Do they even keep kids back anymore? Our grammar school was pretty primitive by today's standards.

    Rich
     
  12. Sep 16, 2013 #72 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Aww, you beat me to it. Yup, they were Bakelite. First practical plastic made by Dr. Baekeland (not sure of the spelling...yup, it's correct) who sold his company to Union Carbide. He started his company in Perth Amboy, I think. Then moved it to Piscataway and sold it to Union Carbide. All this took place in the late '30s. The street on the north side of the plant is Baekeland Avenue. That good Dr. was a major force in my life. If it wasn't for him, I don't know what I would have ended up doing.

    Rich
     
  13. Sep 16, 2013 #73 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I used to be on the rotation for showing movies on our ship. I got pretty good at splicing 16MM movie reels. Did it with the tools you noted. The officers used the get the movies first to show in the wardroom. One day we spliced about two minutes of a porn flick into a John Wayne movie. For some reason the officers didn't appreciate that. Very humorless people, officers were.

    Rich
     
  14. Sep 16, 2013 #74 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    They were pretty handy. I don't remember them in drug stores, tho.

    Rich
     
  15. Sep 16, 2013 #75 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    She is a generation after me. She's a couple years older than my daughter. I don't know anyone else that uses a sewing machine. My grandfather worked for the Singer Sewing Machine company in Newark. I wonder what happened to them?

    Rich
     
  16. Sep 16, 2013 #76 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    Aww. You beat me to that one. Yeah, I remember them. Stirred up a lot of controversy.

    Rich
     
  17. Sep 16, 2013 #77 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I remember the toasters. I remember the revolutionary toasters that did both sides. Then came the pop-ups.

    I didn't see Cinerama when it first came out, but I talked to several people that did and some actually got sick from the rollercoaster ride.

    Rich
     
  18. Sep 16, 2013 #78 of 368
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    I think I paid ~ $350 for mine.

    First Betamax was introduced in 1976 in the States. Japan got it first. I was surprised to see how many companies sold them. I thought they were only sold by Sony.

    Rich
     
  19. Sep 16, 2013 #79 of 368
    dpeters11

    dpeters11 Hall Of Fame

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    Looks like that plant shut down in 1982. I'm just glad that Kitchenaid mixers are still US made.
     
  20. Sep 16, 2013 #80 of 368
    Cholly

    Cholly Old Guys Rule! DBSTalk Club

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    Actually, they were around in the thirties. They were fluoroscopes and had viewing ports where you could see your foot - bones and all. They were finally determined to be health hazards and disappeared.

    My first VCR was a Fisher, with pushbutton tuner, that I paid $425 for at a video rental store,. I still have a Panasonic stereo VCR/DVD recorder that I got in Walmart, probably 15 or more years ago
    I also have a big, heavy Sony 8mm camcorder that I bought in the eighties. It came with a tuner/battery charger that you hooked up to the camcorder, making it into a nice mono 8mm VCR. It still works quite well, although batteries are hard to come by

    My daughter has at least two sewing machines, one of which is a Singer serger. She has made a fair amount of clothing with them. Wikipedia has a fascinating article on the history of the.Singer Corporation and how it diversified over the years.
     

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