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You're stuck with me for another 24 months

Discussion in 'DIRECTV General Discussion' started by Carl Spock, Aug 27, 2012.

  1. Sep 1, 2012 #61 of 103
    Jables

    Jables AllStar

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    Info screen says my HR20-700 is at 126 degrees F, which is about normal. But all the heat pours out the top, so it's usually pretty toasty to the touch. But hey, if it's running OK, can't argue with that. It's a pretty looking setup.
     
  2. Sep 1, 2012 #62 of 103
    Rich

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    That tech wasn't an electrician. What you have coming into your home is single phase 240VAC. The two hot wires are out of phase with each other, but it's still called single phase 240VAC. Or split phase 240VAC.

    That said, he did have a point. Putting your electronics on one hot wire would be a good thing to do. Most folks don't have enough capacity in their panels to do that. Not enough breakers. Bet he didn't mention the 80% rule. Next time you see him tell him to brush up on his nomenclature. And I'd use a real electrician to check your box for overloaded wires if you only have a 100 amp service or less.

    Actually, I thought what he explained to you was common knowledge. I have a hard time doing this, even with my 200 amp box, because of all the electronics I have in my home. If you were getting that much interference, I'd be concerned about loose connections on circuit breakers, receptacles, that sort of thing.

    Rich
     
  3. Sep 1, 2012 #63 of 103
    Rich

    Rich DBSTalk Club DBSTalk Club

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    123 to 126 degrees are the proper operating temps for a 20-700.

    Rich
     
  4. Sep 1, 2012 #64 of 103
    vapor21

    vapor21 Cool Member

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    Like Titan said remove the 8 ways you don't need them. You are loosing dbs. A 2 way splitter is -4db, 4 way is -8db and a 8 way is -12db... I also don't like the connectors that are coming into the swim16 he should had replaced those to dtv approved ones like the red ones you have on the other lines.
     
  5. Sep 1, 2012 #65 of 103
    vapor21

    vapor21 Cool Member

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    Just saw this but when you remove the 8 ways make sure to terminate the other end of the PI, you are loosing dbs there too. Just get one of the terminators from one of the 8 ways.
     
  6. Sep 1, 2012 #66 of 103
    Carl Spock

    Carl Spock Superfly

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    vapor21, I have F-connector shorting plugs lying around here from my days as a home audio installer. Good point.

    Rich, I'm the one who's not an electrician. My tech friend may have said split phase and I wrote two phase.

    As for this idea being common knowledge, or even generally accepted practice, I got a PM on this issue from a forum member whose opinion I regard highly. In the nicest way, he debunked this theory. If it floated my boat, he was OK with it. He wouldn't go there. He would be more concerned about getting a great ground than worrying if everything was powered by one side of the service.

    All I know is what I heard.
     
  7. Sep 1, 2012 #67 of 103
    Rich

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    Yeah, but you have to admit he did a great job of neatly wiring his installation.

    I have a large utility room that has become a "junction box" for my home. I'd be ashamed to show you a picture of that, but it's pretty common to find in industrial buildings.

    Rich
     
  8. Sep 1, 2012 #68 of 103
    vapor21

    vapor21 Cool Member

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    He did a very good job. Its very clean.
     
  9. Sep 1, 2012 #69 of 103
    Rich

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    Is he an electrician?

    You said you saw a difference after rewiring, that didn't surprise me. I didn't doubt you at all.

    Rich
     
  10. Sep 1, 2012 #70 of 103
    Rich

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    Better than I would have done. I used to make things that neat, but, since nobody but me and the township inspector ever look at my home wiring, I pretty much just run the wires. Sloppy, but the devices don't know the difference.

    Rich
     
  11. Sep 1, 2012 #71 of 103
    vapor21

    vapor21 Cool Member

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    I do installs for dtv so I'm just really picky when it comes to installs :lol:
     
  12. Sep 1, 2012 #72 of 103
    Diana C

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    VOS explains it all: http://www.dbstalk.com/showthread.php?p=2638788#post2638788
     
  13. Sep 1, 2012 #73 of 103
    Rich

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    Yup, I used to be that way, but I left the tools and went into management and kinda lost the urge to be really neat. Wire ties made things a lot sloppier too. Used to have to "serve" wires. What a PITA that was, but it really made things neat.

    Rich
     
  14. Sep 1, 2012 #74 of 103
    RAD

    RAD Well-Known Member

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    Dripping...
    Frankly I always hated going into a wiring closet with 150 stations in it and needing to trace back a cable and having to clip tie wraps in order to do it. Unless the public is going to be viewing it I say being too neat is overrated for some things.
     
  15. Sep 1, 2012 #75 of 103
    Rich

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    That's so hard to explain to someone who's never had to do it. Huge, sloppy junction rooms just make it so much easier to work and it saves time.

    Rich
     
  16. Sep 1, 2012 #76 of 103
    Carl Spock

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    Being neat has one advantage. It gets you past the "tough as nails" electrical inspector. I was sweating out his inspection back when I created this distribution a few years ago. He never even looked twice at my install and instead said, "If it's neat, it's probably done right."

    Instead he looked at the electrical panel and insisted that most of the breakers be changed out for different ones. I'm glad he picked on the electrician, not me.

    And thanks for everyone's input. I'll order up the two-way splitters from Solid Signal on Tuesday.
     
  17. Sep 1, 2012 #77 of 103
    hdtvfan0001

    hdtvfan0001 Well-Known Member

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    I must agree that the HR20 used as a "platform" like that is questionable.
     
  18. Sep 1, 2012 #78 of 103
    Rich

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    We've got an inspector that understands and doesn't inspect other installations than what the permit calls for. I had to put a sub panel in my house when I moved in and didn't get it inspected and he's never mentioned it. Nice guy, seems more comfy when talking to another electrician.

    Rich
     
  19. Sep 1, 2012 #79 of 103
    Rich

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    I do stack mine with separators between them and the top 20-700 is usually the same temp as the bottom one. I tried just stacking them once, that didn't work nearly as well.

    Rich
     
  20. Sep 1, 2012 #80 of 103
    Carl Spock

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    It's been that way for three years and hasn't been a problem. As I mentioned upthread, the top is barely warm, out in the open like that.

    Scary was the time I accidentally left the window open in the bathroom above the distribution during a huge thunder storm. Water flooded the bathroom and seeped down around the toilet. There was water over all the electronics, including the HR20. I got lucky and didn't lose anything but I should have.

    As for over-judicious electrical inspectors, in one of the stereo stores I built, the inspector insisted we rip out all of the CAT-5 we'd used for telephones and networking and replace it with plenum. He was right but, jeez. I think he did it just to make sure we knew he was the boss.

    My relationship with the local inspector is different. The first time he was at my house his car died and I had to give him a jump. The irony of helping out the electrical inspector with electricity wasn't lost on either of us. We've had a joking relationship since then.

    That doesn't mean he messes around. The inspector thinks the world of my electrician and he still made him change out most of the breakers he'd installed in a new 200A service for me. I've forgotten the details but there had been a change in the Minnesota code six months before and they were wrong. My electrician grumbled he must have missed the memo and that they were legal on the other side of the Mississippi River in Wisconsin.
     

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