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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Directv using 1080P/24 capable encoders


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29 replies to this topic

#26 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:21 PM

I have a hr20-100 and a Samsung LN-S4695D 46 in HDTV that supports 1080p @60 Hz but I can not get the 1080p on my reciever to work I get no signal to the tv when I try to add the 1080p in the resolutions menu. anyone know if my tv will not support the encoding from directv or is there something else I ned to try oh and I am using a Hdmi cable between them.


Your TV does not support 1080/24p input signals, only 1080/60p, so while you get the progressive scan benefit from video sources (computers, game consoles, and other "video" content), it won't work for film content that is encoded at 24 frames per second (1080/24p). You can still order and watch these movies, but the receiver has to convert it into a format that your TV can accept, and that the chipset in the receiver can output, and the best common resolution is 1080/60i.

You will still get the benefits of the higher bitrate (i.e., less compression, so less macroblocking in difficult-to-compress scenes), but you won't get the full benefit that someone with a "multiple of 24" refresh rate TV could get.

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#27 OFFLINE   mtnsackett

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:35 PM

well hopefuly D* will add support for the 1080p 60 Hz tvs soon. I would email them but I don't want just anther form letter stating thy don't know what I am talking about

#28 OFFLINE   Jeremy W

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 02:44 PM

well hopefuly D* will add support for the 1080p 60 Hz tvs soon.

The video chips can't support 1080p60, so the current receivers will never do it.

#29 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 08 November 2008 - 10:08 PM

well hopefuly D* will add support for the 1080p 60 Hz tvs soon. I would email them but I don't want just anther form letter stating thy don't know what I am talking about


Not only do the chips in the receiver not support it, but it wouldn't matter if they did, because film-based content is encoded at 24p anyway (film uses 24 frames per second). Film has ALWAYS had to be converted, with a 3:2 cadence, to be viewable on TV, which has always been 60 Hz.

It is only in the last two years that there have been TVs made that have the ability to show film content (24 frames per second, or 24p) with each frame being on the display for 1/24th of a second. And only higher-end TVs have had this capability. It requires a display panel and accompanying electronics to be able to refresh the screen at some multiple of 24. There are models with refresh rates of 48, 72, 96, and 120 Hz, depending on display technology. These are the sets that get the full benefit from film content.

The real issue is that TV manufacturers, who knew that 24p content was "coming" and would be important, still advertized 60p-only TVs as "1080p" without clarifying that they only did 1080/60p, and didn't also do 1080/24p.

#30 OFFLINE   gfrang

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Posted 09 November 2008 - 01:03 PM

The movie Seabiscuit,if it comes to blu-ray then i will make my mind on 24p.If your going to see a difference it will be there.




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