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RG59.....Yes or No


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17 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   whatchandstudy

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 06:16 PM

I have seen RG59 cable that is rated at 3ghz as I did a google search. If a building is prewired with RG59. How can I determin the rating of that cable without markings on the cable itself and is high rated RG59 sufficent for Directv and Dish Pro applications. This information is important when making a decision on what to install. Can anyone help?

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#2 OFFLINE   Grentz

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 06:41 PM

Its more just trial and error. It could work, or it might not.
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#3 OFFLINE   satjoe

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 06:55 PM

There is no "block" on 59 cable, there is only a higher resistance on both voltage and RF. Age of wire and moisture including salt air are your biggest concern. 59 cable however does have less sheilding so ingress can be a problem.

Good luck



I have seen RG59 cable that is rated at 3ghz as I did a google search. If a building is prewired with RG59. How can I determin the rating of that cable without markings on the cable itself and is high rated RG59 sufficent for Directv and Dish Pro applications. This information is important when making a decision on what to install. Can anyone help?



#4 OFFLINE   Brandon Wedgeworth

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 06:57 PM

As Grentz said, it's pretty much trial and error. Many people have no issues with short runs of RG59. From my understanding, it's not an issue with RG59's ability to deliver the applicable frequencies, it's the ability...or lack thereof...to carry the required power from the receiver to the LNBs at the dish.

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#5 OFFLINE   whatchandstudy

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 07:30 PM

There is no "block" on 59 cable, there is only a higher resistance on both voltage and RF. Age of wire and moisture including salt air are your biggest concern. 59 cable however does have less sheilding so ingress can be a problem.

Good luck


Thank You for your response.. When you say ingress do you mean outside interference with signals?

#6 OFFLINE   DJTheC

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 08:25 PM

Ingess is when outside signals and interference enter the cable and affect the signal performance.

RG-59, I don't recommend, most of the time they have crimp connectors and they can affect performance.

#7 OFFLINE   Grentz

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 10:23 PM

Crimp connectors are fine. I have some on RG6 cable that was already in my house and it works fine with satellite as long as they are done correctly.

Metal is metal in the case of connectors, biggest difference is how nice they are to work with, how easy they are to get a good termination, and weather proofing all of which are good reasons to go with compression when you can.
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#8 OFFLINE   joe diamond

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Posted 04 November 2008 - 11:14 PM

The objection to rg 59 that I understand caused it to be passed over by CATV folks was the increased attenuation per 1000 ft below certain temperature......I think 30 F. Cable companies had to adjust their plant seasonally.

Short runs in structures have not been a problem other than having a supply of rg59 fittings to modify the runs. It is ez to cut the old stuff off building exteriors but use the interior runs....Find the old splitters and check all fittings.

Joe

#9 OFFLINE   jhillestad

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 10:16 AM

Some of my TV's have RG-59 old cable runs.... works great. Did not feel like running rg6 in the attic so I just used the cable run thats been there for 20 years..... try it before killing yourself running a new cable....

#10 OFFLINE   DJTheC

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 02:50 PM

If it's a basic install, I'll leave the 59 as long as it's ok, might replace a connector here or there (especially if they pull apart easily).

That's the only reason I don't like 59, most times I encounter them, there's a bad connector.

#11 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 07:16 PM

The spec for RG59 is to carry signals up to 1000 MHz (1 GHz). Basic DirecTV uses signals from 950-1450 MHz, which is above the RG59 requirement. Still, better RG59 will usually pass those signals acceptably.

DirecTV HD uses signals from 250-2150 MHz, and in many cases, RG59 is going to be a problem. Not only does it have much more loss at the higher frequencies, but it also has higher resistance to the DC power passing through the cable, resulting in voltage loss and effectively shortening the max length of the cable runs.

RG59 is not approved for DirecTV use in any capacity, but it usually works for SD only and should also work fine with SWM installs. Standard HD really should always be RG6.

#12 OFFLINE   David MacLeod

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 09:01 PM

wonder how many self installs use it and then blame dvr for issue?
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#13 OFFLINE   whatchandstudy

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Posted 05 November 2008 - 11:39 PM

There is also RG59 Cable that has the same size conductor or copper as standard RG6 cable. While ingress may be an issue because of shielding, the conductor should carry the same value being the same gauge. This is in theory and just an observation. Any Thoughts?

#14 OFFLINE   Grentz

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 08:13 AM

Just get RG6 :P
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#15 OFFLINE   satjoe

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 08:38 AM

There is also RG59 Cable that has the same size conductor or copper as standard RG6 cable. While ingress may be an issue because of shielding, the conductor should carry the same value being the same gauge. This is in theory and just an observation. Any Thoughts?


Conducter must be solid copper. Watch out for copper clad. Voltage travles along from the conductor to the sheilding to ground. The less sheilding will affect your loop resistance, the longer the run the worse the ploblem. If there is no alternative to your interior wiring go with it. I would reccommend changing out all 59 for peace of mind. Also do not use crimp fitting. moisure is not the concern but crimping the connector does change the shape of the cable and leaves 8 small holes for ingress to get in. Remember the days of the TV going nuts because of a blender or a vacuum. Those radio fequencies are still there and will now affect the new AU9 dish in the lower freq. Mis-shapping your cable causes a reflection in higher freq.

Good luck

#16 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 10:16 AM

There is also RG59 Cable that has the same size conductor or copper as standard RG6 cable. While ingress may be an issue because of shielding, the conductor should carry the same value being the same gauge. This is in theory and just an observation. Any Thoughts?

I have to seriously question: "RG59 having the same size center conductor as RG6".
To keep it 75 ohm impedance and have the same size center conductor, then the shield must be the same diameter as RG6, and thus this would be RG6 [though maybe a very cheap construction]
A.K.A VOS

#17 OFFLINE   joe diamond

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 12:09 PM

.

Also do not use crimp fitting. moisure is not the concern but crimping the connector does change the shape of the cable and leaves 8 small holes for ingress to get in. Remember the days of the TV going nuts because of a blender or a vacuum. Those radio fequencies are still there and will now affect the new AU9 dish in the lower freq. Mis-shapping your cable causes a reflection in higher freq.

Good luck


OK SATJOE!

I happen to love my crimp fittings. The have an O ring on the platform and have silicon gel already in the shaft where the coax will end up. But my most improtant reason reason for loving these fittings is I can get them for nine dollars per hundred...........$.09 each.

I have not seen compression fitting for less that about a quarter a piece.

So when I was told DTV wanted compression fittings I figured they should know and besides it is their system. Specifications get bumped all the time.

What I have not heard was......."Count the number of fittings you use per job and increase your invoice by $.50 per fitting........and start billing an extra .25 / ft for solid copper rg6.........and get some other colors besides black"

Still waiting!

But you have caused me to consider buying a few bags of the compression fittings and charging for them...somehow.

Joe

#18 OFFLINE   veryoldschool

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Posted 06 November 2008 - 01:01 PM

[crimped] Mis-shapping your cable causes a reflection in higher freq.

Can you "define" this please?
While a mismatch will cause a reflection, a properly crimped [six sided] connector is not going to "mis-shape" the cable, as the connector had a sleeve that maintains the round shape [inside dimension] of the shield. "The crimp" is on the outside of the coax, thus not mis-shaping the electrical [transmission] portion of the coax.
A.K.A VOS




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