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Room Set-up


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10 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   stlboilerdave

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 06:34 PM

I have asked a couple of questions recently about the set-up I will be doing in the new house.

I'm looking to put the TV above the fireplace. I'll have my receiver and Blu-ray nearby. I want to run the lines through the wall. Do I need to have 2 HDMI ports above the fireplace for the TV to hook into (receiver and Blu-ray). Or, does 1 connect to the other?

Any other suggestions on what to run there for connecting to other equipment (HDMI, cat5e, other?)?

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#2 OFFLINE   Mertzen

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 06:44 PM

you could use a HDMI switch, but if it's easy to run two HDMI's it would be cheaper
No longer doing DBS work, but missing every moment of it.

#3 OFFLINE   OptimusPrime

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 06:52 PM

Be more than happy to give some advice - we did the same last year when we got our 42 inch LCD. Is the fireplace a direct vent type - or do you have a chimney?

We ran cables through the wall using fish tape, but be careful of outside walls - they contain insulation and they can be difficult to feed wires. Please give me more details on what you are hoping to do, and I can give you some suggestions.

#4 OFFLINE   stlboilerdave

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 06:53 PM

you could use a HDMI switch, but if it's easy to run two HDMI's it would be cheaper


Thanks for the response. I'd have to run 2 HDMI cables through the wall; plus, I'd have 4 additional HDMI cables to connect into the devices, right? 2 into TV and 1 into receiver and 1 into Blu-ray.

I have also heard you can run 2 cat5e. But, then you need the connectors to convert.

#5 OFFLINE   stlboilerdave

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 06:58 PM

Be more than happy to give some advice - we did the same last year when we got our 42 inch LCD. Is the fireplace a direct vent type - or do you have a chimney?

We ran cables through the wall using fish tape, but be careful of outside walls - they contain insulation and they can be difficult to feed wires. Please give me more details on what you are hoping to do, and I can give you some suggestions.


It's new construction with a direct vent fireplace. I can pre-wire it however necessary. I just want to be equipped for all of this.

I want to have the LCD above the fireplace with the equipment in an entertainment center close-by. It wouldn't be too long of a run in the wall. Do people run both HDMIs through the wall for a TV with this type of set-up?

Thanks for the help.

#6 OFFLINE   barryb

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 07:10 PM

It's new construction with a direct vent fireplace. I can pre-wire it however necessary. I just want to be equipped for all of this.

I want to have the LCD above the fireplace with the equipment in an entertainment center close-by. It wouldn't be too long of a run in the wall. Do people run both HDMIs through the wall for a TV with this type of set-up?

Thanks for the help.


If its new construction then why not run some 1" or larger PVC pipe. This way you can put what ever cables you want, and makes future upgrades easy.
Barry
MY SETUP
You can usually find me helping out in the Quiet Room on Friday chat night.

#7 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 07:28 PM

Thanks for the response. I'd have to run 2 HDMI cables through the wall; plus, I'd have 4 additional HDMI cables to connect into the devices, right? 2 into TV and 1 into receiver and 1 into Blu-ray.

You usually get one HDMI output per device. If you're going all out on audio, you'll run your satellite receiver and Blu-ray HDMI outputs to the A/V receiver and have a single HDMI to the TV. Beware certain A/V receivers and their inability to handle HDMI correctly (older Denon in particular).

If you're not going for umpteen channel audio, you can run one HDMI cable each from the satellite receiver and Blu-ray to the TV and digital audio (typically optical but optimally coaxial) to your A/V receiver.

In any event, you'll be running only one or two HDMI cables to the TV.

#8 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 07:32 PM

If its new construction then why not run some 1" or larger PVC pipe. This way you can put what ever cables you want, and makes future upgrades easy.

1" may not clear two HDMI cables; especially if they have large toroidal coils.

#9 OFFLINE   OptimusPrime

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 08:01 PM

We ran lots of cables for different purposes - you're lucky that it's new construction - that should make it a lot easier before the drywall is up.

We ran 2 HDMI's, an RCA (R/W/Y) cord, and an optical cable out from the TV back to the receiver. Not hard to do, just time consuming. No matter how many wires you run, try to do them all at once with fish tape - the idea of running PVC pipe is a good one if you plan to add on later.

We also ran a ton of speaker wire. Speaking of, if you need to buy any of these cables or possibly converters, I highly suggest monoprice.com. They are of great quality and you will not find a better price.

#10 OFFLINE   Mertzen

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Posted 25 December 2008 - 08:12 PM

Remember that you can't run the power cord inside the wall or any sort of pipe.
No longer doing DBS work, but missing every moment of it.

#11 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 26 December 2008 - 12:15 PM

If you're hanging a TV and you have access to do so, I recommend running a set of cables for EVERY input the TV has. The TV is likely to be up for 10+ years, and you never know what you might want to hook up in the future. Get your cables from Monoprice, and make sure you get them longer than you think you need (people always seem to underestimate on the length), and then you'll never have a problem.

If you're hooking source components directly to the TV, you need a cable for each device. The other alternatives are an external HDMI switch or an HDMI A/V receiver. The problem with the HDMI switch is that all of your devices may not be HDMI, plus it's an extra component to deal with.

An HDMI-equipped A/V receiver can convert and upscale non-HDMI components to HDMI, so that only one HDMI cable is needed from the A/V receiver to the TV. All signal switching is done at the A/V receiver. The downside here is that the A/V receiver must be on to watch TV. Also, some of the lower-end models only do HDMI switching, so they can't convert non-HDMI components, and they can't extract the audio from the HDMI stream. I don't recommend these; pay a little more for a full-featured A/V receiver if you're going to get one.




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