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Satellite Grounding Question


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61 replies to this topic

#51 OFFLINE   asjamias

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:10 AM

sheeshhh...

if you listen to all people here pitch about their grounding know how or knowledge, you will definitely get confused and won't get things done.

if I were the OP, go to you local city inspector and ask them, then have a qualified electrician do the proper grounding if need be, specially since your dish is pole mounted.

I also have a pole mounted dish and had the same dilemma before. I asked, got a lot of talk / suggestions, ended up going with the local city inspector recommendations.

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#52 OFFLINE   Richierich

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 08:18 AM

This Thead validates my claim that an awful lot of dishes are either not properly grounded or are not grounded at all because the installers are too lazy to do it or in too big of a hurry to get in and get out to the next contract thereby increasing their hourly rate of pay.
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#53 OFFLINE   raoul5788

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 11:31 AM

Dont sweat it. If your IRD is plugged into an electrical outlet it is grounded. If you open your electrical panel your white positive is actually just ground. Power flows from negative to ground.


? You have no clue and should stay FAR away from any electric work.

#54 OFFLINE   BattleScott

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 11:31 AM

Nuetral bus bar goes to nuetral braid on power drop. Keep following and you will see nuetral has a ground wire from top of pole to a ground rod at the base of pole.


Correct, but that is strictly the bonding of the sytem neutral point to earth ground for the system reference. It does not provide any protection against accidental shock and certainly not any protection for static (lightning) discharge though the system. Without properly grounding the system prior to the entry point of the dwelling, the only path for that discharge is through the coax cabling and the connected hardware and internal electrical wiring. This exposes anything connected to it, or in close proximity to it along the way to damage or injury.

Edited by BattleScott, 02 January 2009 - 11:42 AM.

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#55 OFFLINE   BattleScott

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 11:39 AM

This Thead validates my claim that an awful lot of dishes are either not properly grounded or are not grounded at all because the installers are too lazy to do it or in too big of a hurry to get in and get out to the next contract thereby increasing their hourly rate of pay.


Installers are not electricians or inspectors and their primary concern is getting the system operational as quickly as possible. Properly grounding the system is not essential to that purpose so it is treated as unnecessary.
Certainly there are installers who do unterstand the importance of it and take the time to make sure it is done, or that the home owner is at least aware that it needs to be, but I am afraid they are a heavy minority.
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#56 OFFLINE   joe diamond

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 02:59 PM

This Thead validates my claim that an awful lot of dishes are either not properly grounded or are not grounded at all because the installers are too lazy to do it or in too big of a hurry to get in and get out to the next contract thereby increasing their hourly rate of pay.


rich,

You are correct. It has always been that way. Lazy is a strange word. It can be confused with fatigued and the other situation, overbooked.

DTV wanted to control costs by setting a single fixed price for installations.
The FREE basic installation is not a pretty thing........did you not know this?

Joe

#57 OFFLINE   Richierich

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 03:48 PM

Rich,

You are correct. It has always been that way. Lazy is a strange word. It can be confused with fatigued and the other situation, overbooked.

DTV wanted to control costs by setting a single fixed price for installations.
The FREE basic installation is not a pretty thing........did you not know this?

Joe


No, I did not know this but as I have been reading posts in the last month or so I have come to that conclusion that they just want to get in and get out as fast as possible because Directv does not pay them on an hourly basis but on a per job basis.
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#58 OFFLINE   joe diamond

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:30 PM

No, I did not know this but as I have been reading posts in the last month or so I have come to that conclusion that they just want to get in and get out as fast as possible because Directv does not pay them on an hourly basis but on a per job basis.


rich,
There are some changes in the air but it is not a national deal, yet? In the recent past DTV started what was called the Master Service Provider (MSP) system. Read price cut..........many companies dropped out. The remaining installation companies......Home Service providers (HSPs) operate independently but get the bulk of the work from DTV. These entities have contractors and subcontractors. All of the above has been piece work byt the job with contractors free to charge for "custom" work; anything not on the basic installation list.


THEN

Pressure was applied to make installers employees and be paid by the hour. Some of the low performing HSPs were bought and redecorated as employers with hourly employees. Turnover has been high.

For myself, I still install DTV through a home theater company and sell jobs for a DTV reseller. These two companies pay per contract and I work hard to make their customers happy. Custom work is quoted in advance.

Every contact with the HSP system has cost me money. I have had to use the courts to get paid by the last two and I can't find the others........they left the state.

So, it's complicated!

Joe

#59 OFFLINE   BattleZone

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:31 PM

No, I did not know this but as I have been reading posts in the last month or so I have come to that conclusion that they just want to get in and get out as fast as possible because Directv does not pay them on an hourly basis but on a per job basis.


The contractors in the Bay Area generally get paid $35-40 to do an HD upgrade. This involves removing the old dish, installing the new, much larger Slimline dish (which requires relocating the dish to a different part of the house about 40% of the time), running 4 lines of solid copper coax to a multiswitch, and then a dual solid copper coax to the HD-DVR they're installing. Inevitably, the customer doesn't want to see that second cable, and the tech will have to do something creative to appease the customer. On average, this job will take 3 hours, but it can take 4-6 if something doesn't go right.

Out of that awesome pay, the tech has to pay for gas, insurances, maintenance, tools, cable (500' box of dual solid copper cable costs $75), connectors, and a host of other supplies. Oh, and he's late to 4 other calls, at least 2 of which will never see him, but his dispatcher will be calling him every 20 minutes to get ETAs for the customers who are waiting.

DirecTV's in-house techs don't pay for supplies or gas, but they only make about 60% of the above pay.

So, yeah, that's one good reason why techs aren't going to spend an extra hour or two, and a ton of money in supplies, to properly ground all systems.

Back in the old days, there was no free installation, and contractors would bid on installs, and all of these items would be worked out. Of course, customers would have to pay for the installation directly. Many of those systems are still working well today. It shouldn't be any surprise that something given away for free is seen to have little value.

#60 OFFLINE   Richierich

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 06:48 PM

I would prefer to pay for compression fittings or grounding or whatever to ensure that my $80,000 worth of Directv Entertainment Systems work all the time and not because of grounding issues such as "static electricity buildup" or the wrong connector for the dish when it gets cold or it rains, or whatever and I am glad that I got this info so I can inform others that it may not be the DVR but the grounding issues, or connector issues, etc.

I sympathize with the installers as I have been a contractor too and understand the issues even though it was in a different type of market.
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#61 OFFLINE   Swampfox

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 07:44 PM

Im a new DTV customer, they did my install on Wednesday, I know they did not ground the dish or the block

If I understand the installation instructions correctly, I can run a ground from the dish base to the grounding block, then from there to my home's electrical service ground.

correct?

#62 OFFLINE   joe diamond

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Posted 02 January 2009 - 09:15 PM

Im a new DTV customer, they did my install on Wednesday, I know they did not ground the dish or the block

If I understand the installation instructions correctly, I can run a ground from the dish base to the grounding block, then from there to my home's electrical service ground.

correct?


Yes!
There should be a small (17ga) wire attached to at least one of the coax lines comming from the dish to the ground block. This little line attaches to the dish and to the ground block. Larger wire (#10) then runs from the ground block to the ground lug ( the #6 wire from the ground rod to the electric panel.)

Do not remove the clamp on the ground rod. Use a split bolt to attach to the lug (or use the telco clamp that is already there)

Joe




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