Jump to content


Welcome to DBSTalk


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to DBSTalk. Our community covers all aspects of video delivery solutions including: Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS), Cable Television, and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). We also have forums to discuss popular television programs, home theater equipment, and internet streaming service providers. Members of our community include experts who can help you solve technical problems, industry professionals, company representatives, and novices who are here to learn.

Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community. Sign-up is a free and simple process that requires minimal information. Be a part of our community by signing in or creating an account. The Digital Bit Stream starts here!
  • Reply to existing topics or start a discussion of your own
  • Subscribe to topics and forums and get email updates
  • Send private personal messages (PM) to other forum members
  • Customize your profile page and make new friends
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Photo
- - - - -

What kind of coax to run?


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   ITrot

ITrot

    Godfather

  • Registered
  • 320 posts
Joined: Aug 14, 2006

Posted 15 January 2009 - 08:47 AM

A friend of mine is building a theatre system in his basement and wants to know what kind of coax to run from the sat to his HR23? There are no wires down there now since it is an unfinished basement. Is there a 'special' brand or specs he has to buy for coax or will any do?

Thanks!

...Ads Help To Support This SIte...

#2 OFFLINE   mobandit

mobandit

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,142 posts
Joined: Sep 04, 2007

Posted 15 January 2009 - 08:49 AM

A friend of mine is building a theatre system in his basement and wants to know what kind of coax to run from the sat to his HR23? There are no wires down there now since it is an unfinished basement. Is there a 'special' brand or specs he has to buy for coax or will any do?

Thanks!


RG6 is the generally accepted coax. Make sure it is solid copper, and not copper clad steel, center conductor. RG6 Quad Shield may be an overkill, but it is also a very good choice. Also make sure that good quality compression fittings are used.

ETCM (SS/SW), USN (RET)
22 years, 4 months, 9 days


#3 OFFLINE   Draconis

Draconis

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 4,403 posts
  • LocationLas Vegas, NV
Joined: Mar 16, 2007

Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:29 PM

RG6 cable, copper-core, and rated to handle at least 2 - 2150 MHz.

#4 ONLINE   carl6

carl6

    Hall Of Fame

  • Moderators
  • 10,906 posts
  • LocationSeattle, WA
Joined: Nov 15, 2005

Posted 15 January 2009 - 08:45 PM

Run an absolute minimum of two RG6 coax to each potential receiver location, as well as a Cat 5e or Cat 6 ethernet connection and a phone connection. If he plans multiple DVRs, wire for each one individually. Plan about twice what you think you might ever possibly want or need, and you will come close to what you end up really wanting.

#5 OFFLINE   ITrot

ITrot

    Godfather

  • Topic Starter
  • Registered
  • 320 posts
Joined: Aug 14, 2006

Posted 16 January 2009 - 06:18 AM

thanks for the replies, another question is can he run power and coax together or is it best to have it run separatly. Running separatly means more drilling of holes in the studs.

#6 OFFLINE   mobandit

mobandit

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,142 posts
Joined: Sep 04, 2007

Posted 16 January 2009 - 08:31 AM

thanks for the replies, another question is can he run power and coax together or is it best to have it run separatly. Running separatly means more drilling of holes in the studs.


Not sure of the specs, but generally it is always better to separate power and any signal-bearing cables. The power line can induce interference into a signal-bearing cable.

ETCM (SS/SW), USN (RET)
22 years, 4 months, 9 days


#7 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

hdtvfan0001

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 31,690 posts
Joined: Jul 28, 2004

Posted 16 January 2009 - 08:44 AM

thanks for the replies, another question is can he run power and coax together or is it best to have it run separatly. Running separatly means more drilling of holes in the studs.

Low voltage (coax, phones, Cat 5 or Cat 6) and high voltage (power) are never good to run together, in fact....in many areas, it violates the building code.

One other thing to consider....running key cables, such as HDMI, etc. to the location of whatever TV or projector display is used is good to route through some PVC piping...as to allow for future changes and easy access without having to tear out drywall in the future....its easy and cheap to do now - costs alot later.
DBSTalk CHAT ROOM MODERATOR
DirecTV Customer Since 1996

#8 OFFLINE   Mike500

Mike500

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,340 posts
Joined: May 10, 2002

Posted 16 January 2009 - 09:00 AM

Here is the basic design of the OPEN WORK METHOD, which I prefer to fixed conduits, which are not necessary and NOT required by code in most all localities.

Run each wire separate and straight.

Do not twist tie any of the wires together inside a wall cavity. Do not staple to the studs or any wood inside the wall cavity.

Do not use any conduit.

All holes through the wooden top, bottom and floor plates should be two or 2-9/16 inches in diameter. One side of the wall stud usually has the "new work" line voltage box nailed to it. Run the low voltage cables down the other side of the stud.

Cables can be fastened and bundled in locations outside of enclosed cavities, so that they can be unfastened and unbundled, and easily removed and replaced.

The top of holes can be covered by cutting pieces of galvanized steel flashing and folding one edge. Place this folded, while clamping the cables to the edge of the hole bored through the wood. Fasten down to the sides of the hole with 1/4 drive hex washered sheet metal screws. Make sure that this plate is accasable from outside the enclosed wall cavity after the house is completed. This will allow the install to meet code.

Cut the back off of the "new work box" where you will eventually have access to the cables. Have the installer staple a wire tie, wrapped and bundle the cables to the stud, so that cutting the wire tie will let you release all of the cables.

If going two or more floors, install a removed back "new work box" at the same level as the other outlet boxes over the cables coming down the wall next to the stud. You can install a blank plate over this frame. Removing two screws on the blank frame will allow easy access to the cables for pulling.




Protected By... spam firewall...And...