Jump to content


Welcome to DBSTalk


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to DBSTalk. Our community covers all aspects of video delivery solutions including: Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS), Cable Television, and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). We also have forums to discuss popular television programs, home theater equipment, and internet streaming service providers. Members of our community include experts who can help you solve technical problems, industry professionals, company representatives, and novices who are here to learn.

Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community. Sign-up is a free and simple process that requires minimal information. Be a part of our community by signing in or creating an account. The Digital Bit Stream starts here!
  • Reply to existing topics or start a discussion of your own
  • Subscribe to topics and forums and get email updates
  • Send private personal messages (PM) to other forum members
  • Customize your profile page and make new friends
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Photo
- - - - -

Powerline versus wireless N


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   spidey

spidey

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 2,299 posts
Joined: Aug 31, 2006

Posted 18 January 2009 - 07:17 PM

So I am looking to do a network upgrade and dont have the capability of running cat 5 cable. Currently have wireless G network however finding the network isnt adequate for HD streaming. My options seem to be to install powerline or wireless N. Wireless N promises 300Mbps and I have seen powerline claims of 85Mbps.

One thing on powerline is do I need a pair for each device? One connected to a router port and other to the other device or can I plug one into the router and than multiples for each other device?

...Ads Help To Support This SIte...

#2 OFFLINE   BattleZone

BattleZone

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 8,969 posts
Joined: Nov 13, 2007

Posted 18 January 2009 - 09:47 PM

You only need one device at the router; however, like wireless, all devices share that bandwidth, and, like wireless, that speed is a theoretical maximum, with real-world performance about half that under ideal conditions, and less than that under normal conditions.

So, I'd probably recommend Wireless N unless you have a ton of nearby WiFi equipment that might cause interference. Also, remember that WiFi will drop to the speed of the slowest device, so make sure everything is "N" if you want those full speeds, or get a Wireless-G access point, set it on a different channel, and keep only the N devices on the N router/AP.

#3 OFFLINE   mikeny

mikeny

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,914 posts
Joined: Aug 20, 2006

Posted 20 January 2009 - 05:38 PM

So I am looking to do a network upgrade and dont have the capability of running cat 5 cable. Currently have wireless G network however finding the network isnt adequate for HD streaming. My options seem to be to install powerline or wireless N. Wireless N promises 300Mbps and I have seen powerline claims of 85Mbps.

One thing on powerline is do I need a pair for each device? One connected to a router port and other to the other device or can I plug one into the router and than multiples for each other device?


You only need one device at the router; however, like wireless, all devices share that bandwidth, and, like wireless, that speed is a theoretical maximum, with real-world performance about half that under ideal conditions, and less than that under normal conditions.

So, I'd probably recommend Wireless N unless you have a ton of nearby WiFi equipment that might cause interference. Also, remember that WiFi will drop to the speed of the slowest device, so make sure everything is "N" if you want those full speeds, or get a Wireless-G access point, set it on a different channel, and keep only the N devices on the N router/AP.

I agree with IIP about being careful on believing in the "promised speed". It's more like a potential with best case scenario. However, I disagree about the statement that WiFi will drop to the speed of the slowest device on the network. I have seen on my 2.4 GHz. band with mixed N/G the N device connected at up to 243 mbps while a G device was connected at 54 mbps. Maybe the N device slowed down a little but certainly not to G speeds. I do think there is something to keeping it N only in general for best results.

With regards to powerline solutions, there are "200 mpbs kits" as well as the 85 mbps kits but they are pretty expensive.
SL3 SWM, 3 HR24-500s, H25-500, DECA

#4 OFFLINE   dave29

dave29

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,903 posts
Joined: Feb 18, 2007

Posted 20 January 2009 - 05:53 PM

powerline works fine for DoD and media share. down the road if MRV is implemented, you will most likely find the best results with a simultaneous dual band N router and adapters. i upgraded my 2 receivers from powerline to the 5ghz band of a dual band setup. streams everything that is thrown at it......

#5 OFFLINE   Bushwacr

Bushwacr

    Legend

  • Registered
  • 185 posts
Joined: Oct 31, 2007

Posted 20 January 2009 - 06:40 PM

So I am looking to do a network upgrade and dont have the capability of running cat 5 cable. Currently have wireless G network however finding the network isnt adequate for HD streaming. My options seem to be to install powerline or wireless N. Wireless N promises 300Mbps and I have seen powerline claims of 85Mbps.

One thing on powerline is do I need a pair for each device? One connected to a router port and other to the other device or can I plug one into the router and than multiples for each other device?


I use a pair of Trendnet 85s (99.00/pair). I get sustained speeds approx 55 to 60 Mbps. It doesn't stutter like the wireless g which seems to be subject to connection issues. The only time I have stutter is streaming 17Mbps OTA Hd and I think that's due to the component hookup.

#6 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 19,403 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 20 January 2009 - 06:45 PM

The nice part about powerline adapters is that they seem to be far less dependent on the layout of your home. You don't have to worry quite so much about dead spots and interference from nearby networks and broadband spewing RF gear.

#7 OFFLINE   dettxw

dettxw

    MRVing

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 4,066 posts
  • LocationChoctaw, OK
Joined: Nov 21, 2007

Posted 20 January 2009 - 10:27 PM

powerline works fine for DoD and media share. down the road if MRV is implemented, you will most likely find the best results with a simultaneous dual band N router and adapters. i upgraded my 2 receivers from powerline to the 5ghz band of a dual band setup. streams everything that is thrown at it......

Yep, a dual-band wireless n router and adapter pair set to 5GHz for HD streaming works flawlessly for me. The 2.4GHz radio is still there to talk to the older-slower components.

-Steve- Subscriber since Sept 1998  My Complete Setup 

SWM16 / HR44-500 (2TB & AM21) / HR34-700 (3TB & AM21) / HR24-500 (2TB eSATA) / C31 via WCCK / C41 x2 / C41W / H25-700


#8 OFFLINE   mikeny

mikeny

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,914 posts
Joined: Aug 20, 2006

Posted 21 January 2009 - 08:11 AM

The nice part about powerline adapters is that they seem to be far less dependent on the layout of your home. You don't have to worry quite so much about dead spots and interference from nearby networks and broadband spewing RF gear.

This is true but they can suffer drastically if they are on different circuits. I remember trying the Turbo+ units DirecTV sells with my computer and it was awesome in the living room but upstairs it really much slower than wireless g and kept disconnecting as well.
SL3 SWM, 3 HR24-500s, H25-500, DECA

#9 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 19,403 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 21 January 2009 - 08:40 AM

HomePlug isn't so much bothered by adapters being on separate circuits as it is by the wiring being incorrect. Swapping line and neutral may foul the performance. Most homes don't have access to three phase power so you don't have to worry about the devices being on separate legs.

#10 OFFLINE   mikeny

mikeny

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,914 posts
Joined: Aug 20, 2006

Posted 21 January 2009 - 09:41 AM

HomePlug isn't so much bothered by adapters being on separate circuits as it is by the wiring being incorrect. Swapping line and neutral may foul the performance. Most homes don't have access to three phase power so you don't have to worry about the devices being on separate legs.

Please educate me as to what you meant by "swapping line and neutral may foul the performance". Also with regards to the "wiring being incorrect", if I don't have any other issues electrically except the Powerline adapter in that location how would I know that the wiring is wrong? If it's wrong, where could it be wrong, along the circuit or in the receptacle?
SL3 SWM, 3 HR24-500s, H25-500, DECA

#11 OFFLINE   CorkyMuldoon

CorkyMuldoon

    Godfather

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 288 posts
Joined: Oct 06, 2006

Posted 21 January 2009 - 11:46 AM

I tried wireless N for MRV between my HR21-700 and H21-200 in the master bedroom. Content was unwatchable.

I decided to give Linksys powerline adapters a try. They boast 87Mbps throughput (although I fully realize that's a theoretical maximu.

Long & short - setup was a snap and the powerline adapters support MRV VERY well.

#12 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 19,403 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 22 January 2009 - 12:08 AM

Please educate me as to what you meant by "swapping line and neutral may foul the performance". Also with regards to the "wiring being incorrect", if I don't have any other issues electrically except the Powerline adapter in that location how would I know that the wiring is wrong? If it's wrong, where could it be wrong, along the circuit or in the receptacle?

The issues are one and the same. If you swap the white wire and the black wire at some point, you may compromise the HomePlug system. This is most likely to happen at an outlet, but it could also happen at a junction box. You can buy an outlet tester for $5-12 that will indicate polarity (by comparing each side to the ground prong) as well as testing GFI outlets.

#13 OFFLINE   mikeny

mikeny

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 1,914 posts
Joined: Aug 20, 2006

Posted 22 January 2009 - 09:19 AM

The issues are one and the same. If you swap the white wire and the black wire at some point, you may compromise the HomePlug system. This is most likely to happen at an outlet, but it could also happen at a junction box. You can buy an outlet tester for $5-12 that will indicate polarity (by comparing each side to the ground prong) as well as testing GFI outlets.

Thanks for the info. Admittedly, I do not have much of a foundation in this area. What would one expect from testing polarity in a normal outlet vs. one that may incorrectly wired?
SL3 SWM, 3 HR24-500s, H25-500, DECA




Protected By... spam firewall...And...