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DNS Network Channels Information!!!


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244 replies to this topic

#1 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:39 PM

A lot of people have been starting threads lately asking about DNS channels, if they are eligible, why they are being taken away, etc.. This thread will attempt to clear up a few things, so that everyone will have one place to go to get the facts, and then also comment on them...

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#2 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:39 PM

For those of you that are wondering what DNS feeds are...

DNS stands for Distant Network Service.

The purpose of DNS feeds is to provide network programing to customers who either:

1. Live in areas that are not reached by Over the Air signals by broadcasters AND are NOT served by Directv local channels.

2. Live in areas that do not have any local channels via DIRECTV™ctv but may or may not be covered by over the air broadcasts. (there are hoops one must jump through to actually get them if this is the case for you)

3. Live outside of any DMA (Designated Market Area, as determined by Nielson).

The rules for DNS feeds in SD and DNS feeds in HD are NOT the same, and just because you may qualify for one, does not mean you qualify for the other.

Also of note, if you qualify for DNS feeds, you do not have a choice of getting East and/or West coast feeds. You can not receive programing earlier than a local station would be airing it in your time zone. Therefore, if you qualify for DNS feeds and live in the Eastern or Central time zones, you will receive East coast DNS channels. If you live in the Mountain or Pacific time zones, you would receive the West Coast DNS channels.

Directv currently is broadcasting the following DNS feeds:

From New York in SD:
WCBS CBS 380
WNBC NBC 382
WABC ABC 386
WNYW FOX 388

From New York in HD:
WCBS CBS 390
WNBC NBC 392
WABC ABC 396
WNYW FOX 398

From Los Angeles in SD:
KCBS CBS 381
KNBC NBC 383
KABC ABC 387
KTTV FOX 389

From Los Angeles in HD:
KCBS CBS 391
KNBC NBC 393
KABC ABC 397
KTTV FOX 399

From Washington in SD:
WDCW CW 385

From PBS in SD:
National Feed of PBS 379


All DNS Channels are $3.50 per channel. HD DNS channels will also require HD Access at $9.99.

Edited by inkahauts, 12 November 2011 - 06:44 PM.
Updated


#3 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:40 PM

There is a "simple process" to see if you qualify for SD DNS feeds.

Eligablility for SD DNS service is based on the availbility of local channels at your home, either by satelite or over the air.


You are definitely eligible for SD DNS feeds if BOTH of the following 2 things are true:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local SD channels.
2. You are in an area that is predicted to not receive a strong enough over the air antenna signal for the local channels in your market.


You are definitly NOT eligable if the following are true:

1. Directv does supply SD local channels for your market.


You might be eligible to get SD DNS feeds if all of the following are true:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local SD channels.
2. Your local stations grants you a wavier saying they will allow you to receive DNS feeds.

OR:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local SD channels.
2. You have a digital signal strength test done (at your cost), and it proves you CAN NOT receive a strong enough signal to actually receive your local channels from an over the air antenna.



Notes:
1. You must call Directv and have them look up your actual physical address to determine if you are predicted to receive a signal or not. Directv does NOT use their own data. It is provided by a third party that your local broadcasters agree is accurate.
2. If you need to have waivers (which are granted at the sole discretion of each local stations) in order too receive DNS feeds, you must get a wavier from EACH individual local station for the corresponding DNS network.
3. Signal Test can range form $150 to $500 for most areas.

#4 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:41 PM

There is a "simple process" to see if you qualify for HD DNS feeds.

Eligablility for HD DNS service is based on the availbility of local channels at your home, either by satelite or over the air.


You are definitely eligible for HD DNS feeds if the following 2 things are true:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local SD or HD channels.
2. You are in an area that is predicted to not receive a strong enough over the air antenna signal for the local channels in your market.


You are definitly NOT eligable if the following are true:

1. Directv does supply HD local channels for your market.


You might be eligible to get HD DNS feeds if all of the following are true:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local HD channels.
2. Your local station grants you a wavier saying they will allow you to receive HD DNS feeds.

OR:

1. You are in an area that Directv does NOT provide local SD or HD channels.
2. You have a digital signal strength test done (at your cost), and it proves you CAN NOT receive a strong enough signal to actually receive your local channels from an over the air antenna.



Notes:
1. You must call Directv and have them look up your actual physical address to determine if you are predicted to receive a signal or not. Directv does NOT use their own data. It is provided by a third party that your local broadcasters agree is accurate.
2. If you need to have waivers (which are granted at the sole discretion of each local stations) in order to receive DNS feeds, you must get a wavier from EACH individual local station for the corresponding DNS network.
3. Signal Test can range form $150 to $500 for most areas.

#5 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:41 PM

At this time, NO.

There has been no indication from Directv or anywhere else that SD DNS feeds will be going away, or that they are changing the rules for eligibility for them.

They, along with no other local SD feed, will be unaffected by the transition to digital only over the air broadcasts.

For customers who long ago choose to have SD DNS feeds because locals where not available at that time, but are now available in your market, if you ever want to receive any local channels, you will loose your DNS feeds, and will not be able to get them back. EVER. You may only have DNS feeds, or local feeds. Not both.

#6 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:42 PM

In some areas, yes.

HD DNS feeds are different than SD feeds. People who had SD DNS feeds before Directv provided SD local channels, where allowed to keep their SD DNS feeds if they elected not to receive the local feeds. This will NOT be the case for HD DNS feeds.

If you have HD DNS feeds now, once your market gets HD local channels, your DNS feeds will go away, permanently. This usually occurs a couple months after your market's local HD channels go live.

Directv has been sending out letters to customers that recieve HD DNS feeds in newer HD local markets, stating that they will be loosing their DNS feeds.

#7 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:42 PM

No.

Eligibility for HD DNS feeds have nothing to do with the conversion off all MPEG-2 HD channels to MPEG-4 HD channels.

Directv has already converted all west coast HD DNS feeds to MPEG-4. They are currently broadcast from D10 and D11.

The East Coast DNS HD feeds are actually available in both MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 at this time. The channels in the 390's are MPEG-4, and should be used if you have the proper equipment. The MPEG-2 HD DNS feeds in the 80's will be going away in the next 6 months, and are only up for customers with legacy MPEG-2 HD equipment who have not yet upgraded to MPEG-4 equipment. Any customer in that situation should call Directv and ask for a free upgrade to MPEG-4 equipment.

#8 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:43 PM

Yes.

Federal legislation allows Directv to deliver DNS service to RVs and commercial trucks without the need for waivers, if the satellite dish is permanently attached to the vehicle. A notarized affidavit stating you have a dish permanently installed on your RV is required. Also of note, boats do not qualify as an RV.

#9 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:44 PM

Directv has most of this information on their website, as well as additional links that you may need.

http://www.directv.c....6063#category4

#10 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:45 PM

Held for future use.

#11 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:45 PM

Held for future use.

#12 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 03:46 PM

Held for future use.

#13 OFFLINE   blc

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 05:06 PM

All accurate for the most part, with a few exceptions for a very small percentage of subscribers, which you probably did not intend to address.

However, one thing worth pointing out is "waivers." A "waiver" issued by a local affiliate, if obtained, trumps most of the statutory restrictions you have outlined and allows the subscriber to receive DNS even if locals are offered by DirecTV and/or the subscriber can obtain a grade b or better signal over the air. This is because the affiliate has waived its exclusivity rights to the broadcast content. The waivers, however, are specific to SD or HD (digital).

#14 OFFLINE   bobnielsen

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 05:32 PM

A couple of points--

I believe that you can still get both east and west feeds of SD DNS channels but not HD.

If a station denies a waiver and you have a signal strength test run, you will pay for the test if it shows that you can receive a signal. If the test shows that you cannot receive the signal, the station pays for the test.

#15 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 08:30 PM

A couple of points--

I believe that you can still get both east and west feeds of SD DNS channels but not HD.

If a station denies a waiver and you have a signal strength test run, you will pay for the test if it shows that you can receive a signal. If the test shows that you cannot receive the signal, the station pays for the test.


Thats only for a HD test. A SD test you are not out any money no matter if you can get signal or not.

#16 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 08:36 PM

You can submitt your own waivers to the affiliates for SD and HD. Here is the link to the location on D*'s website http://www.directv.c...880022#h:583.71

Also once you have sbumitted them there is another link you can check on them anytime you like http://www.directv.c...80022#h:583.256

I used this to apply every time I was denied. I live in a grade A signal area that D* does not provide locals to. Most people would tell you dont waste your time. Well let me tell you even though I live in a grade A signal area I have been successful using this tool to get ABC, NBC, & FOX approved for SD DNS feeds from the east and west coasts as well as CW & PBS SD feed. The only one that I have not had approved is CBS. I will continue to submit it until they do grant my waiver.

D* will tell you they can only submit them once evey 90 days. Take it into your own hands. I checked everyday and the day I was denied I resubmiutted it that same day. Also according to the post cards I have recieved in the mail from D* if you have SD DNS feed and you get the HD DNS granted there is no extra charge for the HD DNS channel. Dont be afraid to try for waivers. You never know what you can get. I am proof that you can get lucky if you try and I did not have to cheat the system to get lucky either.

#17 OFFLINE   Herdfan

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Posted 25 January 2009 - 08:44 PM

What about the rules for Grandfathered subs of both SD and HD (actual term is Distant Digital Service) DNS?

#18 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:00 AM

What about the rules for Grandfathered subs of both SD and HD (actual term is Distant Digital Service) DNS?


If I remember right the rule is if you have had HD DNS since before 2004 then you are able to keep it. Now that being said I am pretty sure that I read some lost it anyways. I think Lord Vador was one of them but I think he was able to get his back. Anything to deal with DNS is like pulling teeth with the local affiliates and D*. But that being said I guess its better then pulling a E* and not being able to offer it anymore.

#19 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:14 AM

What about the rules for Grandfathered subs of both SD and HD (actual term is Distant Digital Service) DNS?


http://www.dbstalk.c...876#post1972876

#20 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:36 AM

All accurate for the most part, with a few exceptions for a very small percentage of subscribers, which you probably did not intend to address.

However, one thing worth pointing out is "waivers." A "waiver" issued by a local affiliate, if obtained, trumps most of the statutory restrictions you have outlined and allows the subscriber to receive DNS even if locals are offered by DirecTV and/or the subscriber can obtain a grade b or better signal over the air. This is because the affiliate has waived its exclusivity rights to the broadcast content. The waivers, however, are specific to SD or HD (digital).


What specific subs, and whats not correct for them? I'd like this to be completely accurate.

As for waivers, all information today points to the fact that if Directv offers sd or hd locals, and you are not in some way grandfathered in, they will not turn on any distants for you, and no wavier will override that, because waivers do not force Directv to turn on DNS feeds, rather they allow Directv to supply them...

I believe that you can still get both east and west feeds of SD DNS channels but not HD.

If a station denies a waiver and you have a signal strength test run, you will pay for the test if it shows that you can receive a signal. If the test shows that you cannot receive the signal, the station pays for the test.


Thats only for a HD test. A SD test you are not out any money no matter if you can get signal or not.


There is no longer two different tests. There is only the digital test. (which makes sense with all analogue going away in Feb)The only information I have seen on this says that the customer will have to pay for it, not the station or Directv. If anyone can point me to info that states otherwise, please do so I can update the appropriate thread.

There was a point in time when Directv was allowing people to have east and west DNS feeds, but according to recent information, that has ended.




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