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DNS Network Channels Information!!!


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244 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   inkahauts

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:39 AM

If I remember right the rule is if you have had HD DNS since before 2004 then you are able to keep it. Now that being said I am pretty sure that I read some lost it anyways. I think Lord Vador was one of them but I think he was able to get his back. Anything to deal with DNS is like pulling teeth with the local affiliates and D*. But that being said I guess its better then pulling a E* and not being able to offer it anymore.


Many of the people that fall under that rule have lost their DNS feeds, and some have gotten them back. However, the number of people that have had DNS HD feeds since before 2004 is very small.

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#22 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 03:40 AM

There is no longer two different tests. There is only the digital test. (which makes sense with all analogue going away in Feb)The only information I have seen on this says that the customer will have to pay for it, not the station or Directv. If anyone can point me to info that states otherwise, please do so I can update the appropriate thread.

There was a point in time when Directv was allowing people to have east and west DNS feeds, but according to recent information, that has ended.


I have the letter from D* still that says I can have a test done without charge but its not for HD either. Guess I snuck in under the bell.

#23 OFFLINE   Herdfan

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:57 AM

However, the number of people that have had DNS HD feeds since before 2004 is very small.


If I remember it correctly, the cutoff date was December 8, 2004. At that time only CBS and NBC had full-time HD DNS feeds. FOX had a temp feed up for the World series, but did not go full time until late December. ABC went up around the same time as well.

But I still think that if you had them before December 8th, you are allowed to keep them even if your locals are in HD (technically digital).

But this presents another issue because many DMA's are only providing digital signals to satellite providers. I know my DMA has been "digital" since October, so how should this affect those with digital DNS?

#24 OFFLINE   blc

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 11:38 AM

As has been discussed before, simply because locals become available from DirecTV does not automatically require the digital DNS feeds to be removed. Here is a link to the FCC Order in MB Docket No. 05-317, dated January 16, 2008, in which the FCC has specifically stated what the SHVERA statute (47 U.S.C. § 339) says in regard to retaining digital (HD for practical purposes) DNS even after locals become available. Whether or not a subscriber can get DirecTV to recognize this is another matter entirely. Specifically, look at the second half of paragraph 5, found of page three of that Order.

http://hraunfoss.fcc...DA-08-111A1.pdf

"Section 339(a)(2)(D)(iii)(III) of the Act also requires that to be eligible for distant digital signals, subscribers must subscribe to the analog local-into-local package, where offered, and receive the analog signal of the network station affiliated with the same network, where available. For new local-into-local markets, subscribers receiving a distant digital signal of a network station can continue to receive that signal after a satellite carrier begins offering local-into-local digital signals in the market only if the subscriber also
subscribes to the digital signal of the local station affiliated with the same network."

As to waivers, the law continues to allow a subscriber to obtain a "waiver" to receive a distant digital feed even if "the network station affiliated with the same network is available." This is found at 47 U.S.C. § 339(a)(2)(E), where a distant signal can be provided to such a subscriber "if and to the extent that such local network station has affirmatively granted a waiver form the requirements of this paragraph to such satellite carrier with respect to retransmission of such distant network station to such subscriber." This waiver provision, however, excludes distant analog retransmission to subscribers who already have locals but failed to obtain analog DNS prior to having the locals rebroadcast by the satellite provider. This is because the waiver provision (subparagraph (E)) specifically applies only to subparagraphs (A), (B), and (D), but not ©. Subparagraph © is "Future applicability" for analog DNS to subscribers who already have locals provided but did not have DNS before the locals were provided. Subparagraph (D) is the digital DNS paragraph and the waiver provision specifically states that it applies to subparagraph (D). Thus, any subscriber who does not qualify as eligible to receive HD DNS is allowed under the statute to attempt to obtain a waiver from the local affiliate for the digital DNS.

#25 OFFLINE   bobnielsen

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:05 PM

There is no longer two different tests. There is only the digital test. (which makes sense with all analogue going away in Feb)The only information I have seen on this says that the customer will have to pay for it, not the station or Directv. If anyone can point me to info that states otherwise, please do so I can update the appropriate thread.

There was a point in time when Directv was allowing people to have east and west DNS feeds, but according to recent information, that has ended.


Actually it is a bit more complicated. If Directv requests the test and it shows you cannot receive the station, the station pays, otherwise Directv pays for the test. If Directv refuses to test and you arrange for the test yourself, you pay regardless of the outcome.

From the FCC SHVERA Information Sheet:

Alternatively, if your household is predicted “served,” you may be able to get a waiver from the television stations that are predicted to serve your household over-the-air. You should ask your satellite company to request a waiver from the television station on your behalf. The station has 30 days from the date that it receives the waiver request to either grant or deny the request. If the station does not issue a decision within 30 days, the waiver is considered to be granted and the satellite company may provide the distant signals. The satellite company is not required to provide the distant signals and may choose to wait longer than 30 days before doing so.


If the station denies the waiver, you may request to have a signal strength test performed at your household to determine whether the TV station’s signal is at least Grade B intensity. Although the satellite carrier is not required to act on your request, if the carrier accepts your test request, the test should be performed within 30 days after the date that you submit your request. The test must be performed by an independent tester selected by the satellite carrier and the TV station. If the satellite carrier requests the test and the station’s signal exceeds the signal intensity standard, the satellite carrier pays for the test. If the station’s signal is determined not to exceed the signal intensity standard, the station pays for the test. If the satellite carrier does not act on your request for a signal strength test, or fails to respond to you within 30 days, and you reside in a DMA where the satellite carrier does not provide local-into-local service, you may arrange for the test yourself. You will have to pay for the test no matter what it shows and the price may include the cost for the tester to come to your house. The test must still be conducted by an independent tester that both the network station and the satellite carrier have approved.

#26 OFFLINE   Brian Hanasky

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:39 PM

Actually it is a bit more complicated. If Directv requests the test and it shows you cannot receive the station, the station pays, otherwise Directv pays for the test. If Directv refuses to test and you arrange for the test yourself, you pay regardless of the outcome.

From the FCC SHVERA Information Sheet:

Alternatively, if your household is predicted “served,” you may be able to get a waiver from the television stations that are predicted to serve your household over-the-air. You should ask your satellite company to request a waiver from the television station on your behalf. The station has 30 days from the date that it receives the waiver request to either grant or deny the request. If the station does not issue a decision within 30 days, the waiver is considered to be granted and the satellite company may provide the distant signals. The satellite company is not required to provide the distant signals and may choose to wait longer than 30 days before doing so.


If the station denies the waiver, you may request to have a signal strength test performed at your household to determine whether the TV station’s signal is at least Grade B intensity. Although the satellite carrier is not required to act on your request, if the carrier accepts your test request, the test should be performed within 30 days after the date that you submit your request. The test must be performed by an independent tester selected by the satellite carrier and the TV station. If the satellite carrier requests the test and the station’s signal exceeds the signal intensity standard, the satellite carrier pays for the test. If the station’s signal is determined not to exceed the signal intensity standard, the station pays for the test. If the satellite carrier does not act on your request for a signal strength test, or fails to respond to you within 30 days, and you reside in a DMA where the satellite carrier does not provide local-into-local service, you may arrange for the test yourself. You will have to pay for the test no matter what it shows and the price may include the cost for the tester to come to your house. The test must still be conducted by an independent tester that both the network station and the satellite carrier have approved.


If you ask Directv they would say that the policy regarding waiver waiting times is 45 days. This issue came up about a month ago for me. I had requested a waiver for CBS HD DNS. After 30 calendar days the waiver was still pending. No matter how many CSR's I spoke to + a couple of emails I was told that despite the law Directv gives the local stations 45 days. With nobody else left to call I started to wait again. Guess what? The damn station denied my waiver a couple of days later. Moral of the story is that although the law says one thing Directv made it's own policy (probably to make nice with local affiliates).

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#27 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:45 PM

Actually it is a bit more complicated. If Directv requests the test and it shows you cannot receive the station, the station pays, otherwise Directv pays for the test. If Directv refuses to test and you arrange for the test yourself, you pay regardless of the outcome.

From the FCC SHVERA Information Sheet:

Alternatively, if your household is predicted “served,” you may be able to get a waiver from the television stations that are predicted to serve your household over-the-air. You should ask your satellite company to request a waiver from the television station on your behalf. The station has 30 days from the date that it receives the waiver request to either grant or deny the request. If the station does not issue a decision within 30 days, the waiver is considered to be granted and the satellite company may provide the distant signals. The satellite company is not required to provide the distant signals and may choose to wait longer than 30 days before doing so.


If the station denies the waiver, you may request to have a signal strength test performed at your household to determine whether the TV station’s signal is at least Grade B intensity. Although the satellite carrier is not required to act on your request, if the carrier accepts your test request, the test should be performed within 30 days after the date that you submit your request. The test must be performed by an independent tester selected by the satellite carrier and the TV station. If the satellite carrier requests the test and the station’s signal exceeds the signal intensity standard, the satellite carrier pays for the test. If the station’s signal is determined not to exceed the signal intensity standard, the station pays for the test. If the satellite carrier does not act on your request for a signal strength test, or fails to respond to you within 30 days, and you reside in a DMA where the satellite carrier does not provide local-into-local service, you may arrange for the test yourself. You will have to pay for the test no matter what it shows and the price may include the cost for the tester to come to your house. The test must still be conducted by an independent tester that both the network station and the satellite carrier have approved.


Thats not true. D* will not pay for a HD test neither will the affiliate. I know this first hand because I just went through it. They both refused to pay it and said I would be out of pocket the money myself if I wanted the test done.

#28 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 12:47 PM

If you ask Directv they would say that the policy regarding waiver waiting times is 45 days. This issue came up about a month ago for me. I had requested a waiver for CBS HD DNS. After 30 calendar days the waiver was still pending. No matter how many CSR's I spoke to + a couple of emails I was told that despite the law Directv gives the local stations 45 days. With nobody else left to call I started to wait again. Guess what? The damn station denied my waiver a couple of days later. Moral of the story is that although the law says one thing Directv made it's own policy (probably to make nice with local affiliates).


I went through this to. What I did was just submit the waivers myself from D*'s site. D* will tell you that you can only submit them once every 90 days or something like that. Dont listen to that. Its on the site and you can resubmit the day they deny it. I did it for a few months and got all approved excpet CBS and I am still working on it. At some point they get tired of seeing my name and grant it.

#29 OFFLINE   Brian Hanasky

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:34 PM

I went through this to. What I did was just submit the waivers myself from D*'s site. D* will tell you that you can only submit them once every 90 days or something like that. Dont listen to that. Its on the site and you can resubmit the day they deny it. I did it for a few months and got all approved excpet CBS and I am still working on it. At some point they get tired of seeing my name and grant it.


Yea I submit on the website as soon as I'm denied. So far both my NBC and CBS haven't decided that they are tired of me. I've been submitting new waiver requests as soon as I'm denied for several months now.

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#30 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:38 PM

Yea I submit on the website as soon as I'm denied. So far both my NBC and CBS haven't decided that they are tired of me. I've been submitting new waiver requests as soon as I'm denied for several months now.


Dont give up. It happened for me. FOX straight up told me they would not grant it and low and behold it happend. I spoke with the GM there last week and he said I must of slipped through cause it should not of happened. He said enjoy lol. Are you sending waiver requests for SD and HD?

#31 OFFLINE   jdspencer

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 01:40 PM

...
All DNS Channels are $2.99 per channel. HD DNS channels will also require HD Access at $9.99.

The $2.99 covers both east and west coast feeds of each DNS network in SD. And the DC CW feed is $1.99.
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#32 OFFLINE   joshjr

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 02:02 PM

The $2.99 covers both east and west coast feeds of each DNS network in SD. And the DC CW feed is $1.99.


I think PBS is $1.50 a month.

#33 OFFLINE   jdspencer

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 02:48 PM

That may be true, but it is only one channel. I dropped PBS when my local OTA became available.
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#34 OFFLINE   NASCR2424

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 03:25 PM

Thats not true. D* will not pay for a HD test neither will the affiliate. I know this first hand because I just went through it. They both refused to pay it and said I would be out of pocket the money myself if I wanted the test done.




I actually had this test done for NBC about two years ago and did not have to pay anything, but that was two years ago..

#35 OFFLINE   Visman

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 07:46 PM

That is not totaly true because I live outside the Houston area and get both East and West DNS feeds plus all the Houston Locals throw DirecTV.

#36 OFFLINE   Lord Vader

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 09:09 PM

If I remember right the rule is if you have had HD DNS since before 2004 then you are able to keep it. Now that being said I am pretty sure that I read some lost it anyways. I think Lord Vador was one of them but I think he was able to get his back.


Indeed. I didn't lose them when the December monthly sweep of HD DNS customers was done, but on January 16th they were mysteriously shut off. However, a polite reminder call from me to someone special at DirecTV, whose direct line I was given, got my HD DNS feeds correctly turned back on later that day on the 16th. I was reassured by this individual, who called me today to let me know she's on top of it, that this won't happen again.

FAITH: I find the lack of it disturbing.

Opinions are my own but should be those of all Americans, who would be much better off intellectually, psychologically, and emotionally if that were the case.


#37 OFFLINE   blc

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:04 PM

Lord Vader,that's good to hear. I think DirecTV's software used to sweep the accounts is not able to distinguish those few accounts that statutorily qualify to retain HD DNS. Maybe your account will now be safe . . . hopefully. But as we've discussed before, don't lose that number, you'll probably need it again.

#38 OFFLINE   Lord Vader

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Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:07 PM

Lord Vader,that's good to hear. I think DirecTV's software used to sweep the accounts is not able to distinguish those few accounts that statutorily qualify to retain HD DNS. Maybe your account will now be safe . . . hopefully. But as we've discussed before, don't lose that number, you'll probably need it again.


I have it tucked away. The Force can have a strong influence on the weak mind, BTW.

FAITH: I find the lack of it disturbing.

Opinions are my own but should be those of all Americans, who would be much better off intellectually, psychologically, and emotionally if that were the case.


#39 OFFLINE   Dolly

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Posted 31 January 2009 - 04:44 PM

I have a question. Before we got our SD locals from D* we got waivers to get the SD DNS Feeds from both the East and West Feeds. We got the waivers from Fox, ABC, and NBC. CBS would never give us a waiver. When D* got our SD locals to us I thought the SD DNS Feeds would be taken away, but they never have been. When and if (?) D* gets our locals to us in HD will these SD DNS Feeds be taken away then?

#40 OFFLINE   Dolly

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Posted 21 February 2009 - 08:18 PM

I have a question. Before we got our SD locals from D* we got waivers to get the SD DNS Feeds from both the East and West Feeds. We got the waivers from Fox, ABC, and NBC. CBS would never give us a waiver. When D* got our SD locals to us I thought the SD DNS Feeds would be taken away, but they never have been. When and if (?) D* gets our locals to us in HD will these SD DNS Feeds be taken away then?

Since I never got a answer to my question,
I just called D* and got them removed myself :lol:




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