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Guest Message by DevFuse

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Television -- As We Know It -- Is Finished


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45 replies to this topic

#41 OFFLINE   bicker1

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 07:02 PM

But if that were true... wouldn't ALL the networks be moving in the same direction? That being less and less scripted TV?

As I pointed out earlier, one (and a half) of the networks is closely-held by people who have made it clear that they are intent on imposing their own perspective of how television should be on their network. Besides that, the networks are indeed all moving in roughly the same direction, though perhaps taking different paths and at different rates.

What I'm seeing, however, is while the networks are trying to cost-reduce with non-scripted TV... the cable networks are actually increasing their original scripted programming.

Cable networks are trying to establish themselves. I think we'll see either per subscriber fees for cable nets doubling, or quality halving, in time.

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#42 OFFLINE   phrelin

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Posted 18 August 2009 - 11:53 PM

Huh? You must be speaking some strange dialect of English that I'm unfamiliar with.

There are many things that I have wanted that I knew were not what ought to be. "Ought" is an auxiliary verb generally involving duty, propriety, or moral obligation (See Dictionary.com) In my life I have wanted much that did not fall within the meaning of those terms.;)

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#43 OFFLINE   bicker1

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 04:00 AM

There are many things that I have wanted that I knew were not what ought to be.

However, your clarification still leaves your assertions in the category of your personal beliefs and values, which was my original point.

If you want to move away from what you think ought to be to what generally ought to be, then you have to tie your assertions back to a practically undisputed prevailing consensus, such as the law, or declarations by those providing what you want saying that they promise to provide specifically what you're saying they ought to.

Let's be clear! It is okay to want things, eh? Don't think that what you want is so inconsequential so as to not deserve an airing. The point is just to keep it in the proper context.

#44 OFFLINE   SamC

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:07 AM

IMHO,

- Fortnightly was rightly decided and all that came after is an example of why people are not looked out for by government.

- That does not mean that I think people should be able to get Boston ABC when they live in Wichita. What I do think is that Wichita ABC should be free to people living in Wichita, and that the 10% of Americans who have an OTA situation other than being freely able to receive the "big four" networks OTA from the same city should be accomodated in a meaningful and fair manner, as a conditon of their liscenses.

- People have been predicting the death of OTA TV for decades. One of the lies the OTA liscense owners told to get Congress to overturn Fortnightly was that they had to have the retansmission money to survive, and that was in the 80s.

- Faux-reality competiton shows are just a fad, as were game shows, wrestling, and whatever. The backbone of OTA TV is, and will remain, scripted shows, news, big and little sports, and the local connection to the viewer that no national network, nor DBS, can provide, and cable is too cheep to.

- The ad based model for financing TV has a lot of holes. Nielsen is inaccurate, people don't watch commercials, nobody remembers what product is being sold, ads do not change habits, etc. All true. But Madison Ave. is full of people who are selling big companies on TV as is, and they are vested in continuing the myth that it works.

- The fact that a cable channel can do a scripted show just shows how much money the networks were making back in the day. If you can make money with a scripted show on USA or TBS, or on Canadian TV only or AustralianTV only, imagine how much money they were making in the three channel world.

- NBC, which is to say GE, is just cheep. That simple.

#45 OFFLINE   bicker1

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 05:17 AM

What I do think is that Wichita ABC should be free to people living in Wichita

That's what antennas are for.

Faux-reality competiton shows are just a fad, as were game shows, wrestling, and whatever.

There is no rational basis for such an assertion. As such, it is just wishful thinking, which a lot of us share with you, but just hopes all the same. Beyond that, everything is a "fad" until it isn't anymore, and reality shows are probably already beyond that point. Remember that prime time used to be littered with game shows. Today's reality shows are just an outgrowth of that. And also remember that prime time used to be littered with "variety" shows: The Jay Leno Show indicates a return of that long-well-established genre to prime time, not necessarily a fad.

The backbone of OTA TV is, and will remain, scripted shows, news, big and little sports, and the local connection to the viewer that no national network, nor DBS, can provide, and cable is too cheep to.

Working backwards, cable already fosters more significant local programming that OTA ever had, with NECN for news, NESN for sports, and Local on the 8s on the Weather Channel, not to mention PEG providing local access to broadcasting to a degree that OTA never provided. Cable is the premium source.

Moving on... there is no rational basis for your assertion about what the backbone of OTA TV is. That's wishful thinking, which I share with you, but wishful thinking doesn't make it true.

- NBC, which is to say GE, is just cheep.

On the contrary, they're responsible. They have a fiduciary responsibility to their owners to maximize long-term ROI.

#46 OFFLINE   trainman

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Posted 19 August 2009 - 09:44 AM

- Run daytime (aka the 6-hour Today show) more like CNN/FOX/MSNBC


This actually might not be a bad idea for a change to the "Today" show -- as it is, not all of their affiliates carry the entire current 4-hour version between 7:00 and 11:00; some of them delay one or both of the 9:00 and 10:00 hours in order to fit in syndicated programming (e.g., "Regis and Kelly" at 9:00). The affiliates might be happier if it were instead a live 6-hour or 8-hour block that they could join or leave for certain hours.

And that's actually a format that has a history at NBC, with their "Monitor" radio show that ran on the weekends from the mid-1950s to the mid-1970s. I'm assuming nobody currently at NBC remembers "Monitor," though -- or even that they used to have a radio network. :D
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