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Guest Message by DevFuse

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DIRECTV now broadcasting 1080p HD


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251 replies to this topic

#241 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 06 November 2009 - 11:44 PM

No, 1080i30 means nothing because it is not a standard.

What is not a standard is the 1080inn notation. It is so bad that there is a move afoot to go towards a new syntax, 1080/nni where nn is uniquely the frame rate.

As bodosom notes, 1080i30 and 1080i60 are used interchangeably and both represent a frame rate of 30, the maximum documented by ATSC A/53 (broadcast) for both interlace and progressive scan.

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#242 OFFLINE   Richierich

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 02:20 AM

National HD lags, but woot, we've got 1080p, that many can't, and even more won't, use.
Pfffffffft.


That is why I NEVER wanted HBO or watched HBO because the movies I had either seen about 2 or 3 years before many times or they weren't worth watching!!!

#243 OFFLINE   hdtvfan0001

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 07:04 AM

Some of the later movies in 2008 and into 2009 begin to take advantage of the new 1080p format, in terms of presentation.

I enjoy some of the animated flicks of late - such as UP - which looks stellar in 1080 anything (1080i or 1080p). Some of these coming out on Blu Ray show just how good 1080 can look.

Commercial movies are just starting to get on board to embrace the potential.
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#244 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 07 November 2009 - 10:00 AM

That is why I NEVER wanted HBO or watched HBO because the movies I had either seen about 2 or 3 years before many times or they weren't worth watching!!!

Do you see all the newest movies on rental discs, PPV or in the theater and never want to see them again?

Do you not watch series television?

I haven't been to a movie theatre for several years and have never rented a movie. Even the three year old movies are new to me.

The term "not worth watching" comes up surprisingly often in rationalizations. How do you know?

#245 OFFLINE   gregjones

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:44 AM

What is not a standard is the 1080inn notation. It is so bad that there is a move afoot to go towards a new syntax, 1080/nni where nn is uniquely the frame rate.

As bodosom notes, 1080i30 and 1080i60 are used interchangeably and both represent a frame rate of 30, the maximum documented by ATSC A/53 (broadcast) for both interlace and progressive scan.


If so, it is a move pushed by people that don't understand video refresh rates. 1080i60 clearly defines a refresh rate of 60 where half of the lines are refreshed. Call it what you will, but many of us know there's a difference. If you had tried to setup your computer to output to your TV, the modes are very very different.

#246 OFFLINE   Podkayne

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Posted 09 November 2009 - 09:57 AM

I would pay money for an HR 2x-x00 that would output 1080p/60 to my (apparently) obsolete 58" Panasonic Plasma that I bought in July 2007.

In the mean time I've had to pull the HDMI from the HR20-100 and connect it by component video cables, using the two HDMI's on the TV for my OPPO DVD and Sammy 3600 Blu Ray player.

#247 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 12:42 AM

If so, it is a move pushed by people that don't understand video refresh rates. 1080i60 clearly defines a refresh rate of 60 where half of the lines are refreshed.

Any abbreviated notation is by convention. The 1080inn notation seems to have no conventional consistency regardless of the brand of display card you use. Computer display cards should have never been called "video cards" as they've never really made good, legal video until the advent of HDTV.

Display card scan refresh rates are most often handled separately from resolution. Using a poorly standardized combined notation isn't helping anyone.

#248 OFFLINE   ctaranto

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 08:57 AM

I would pay money for an HR 2x-x00 that would output 1080p/60 to my (apparently) obsolete 58" Panasonic Plasma that I bought in July 2007.

In the mean time I've had to pull the HDMI from the HR20-100 and connect it by component video cables, using the two HDMI's on the TV for my OPPO DVD and Sammy 3600 Blu Ray player.


I'm guilty of not reading this entire thread, so I'm wondering why you aren't able to get 1080p/60 on your Panasonic Plasma? I have a Panasonic 54" G10 (2009), which just like yours takes HDMI. There is a setting on mine that allows for 1080p/48Hz (flicker-ville) or 1080p/60Hz. I would assume yours being a few years older would at least support 1080p/60Hz.

Have you set up your HR to output 1080p? When you're on a 1080p channel, do both 720p/1080i lights light up? When you hit "info" on your TV, does it show the mode the TV is in?

/c

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#249 OFFLINE   bodosom

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 10:40 AM

I'm guilty of not reading this entire thread, so I'm wondering why you aren't able to get 1080p/60 on your Panasonic Plasma?


Probably because the HR DVRs don't do 1080p60. They do 1080i60 or 1080p24.

#250 OFFLINE   gregjones

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 01:07 PM

Any abbreviated notation is by convention. The 1080inn notation seems to have no conventional consistency regardless of the brand of display card you use. Computer display cards should have never been called "video cards" as they've never really made good, legal video until the advent of HDTV.

Display card scan refresh rates are most often handled separately from resolution. Using a poorly standardized combined notation isn't helping anyone.


But you can't toss out the name used appropriately for years now just because you don't like it.

#251 OFFLINE   ctaranto

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 02:28 PM

Probably because the HR DVRs don't do 1080p60. They do 1080i60 or 1080p24.


Funny, I don't remember saying the HR did 1080p60.

The TV will render then 1080p24 stream at 1080p24 @ 60Hz if it doesn't support another evenly divisible refresh rate (such at 48Hz or 72Hz). In my case, I can choose from 1080p24 @ 48Hz (flicker, but evenly divisible) or 1080p24 @ 60Hz (no flicker, but displayed with an uneven divisible refresh resulting in a frame unevenness). Refresh doesn't affect the frames/second being fed by the HR. It's always 1080p24 on the 1080p24 channels.

I prefer @60Hz since the flicker really annoys me. Going to the V10, which supports 72Hz, is even better since it's even divisible *and* flicker free (but I didn't feel like spending the premium for that over the G10).

Either way, the info on the TV should show 1080P on 1080P fed channels/sources.

/c

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Control: Home Theater Master MX-500
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#252 OFFLINE   harsh

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Posted 10 November 2009 - 11:41 PM

Either way, the info on the TV should show 1080P on 1080P fed channels/sources.

One might well assume that, but when the signal is coming through at 24 frames per second, some televisions just don't deal with it.




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