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Guest Message by DevFuse

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The End of HDTV Broadcasting?


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80 replies to this topic

#76 OFFLINE   bicker1

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 12:40 PM

I find it ironic that so much effort went into defining the HD standard in terms of OTA transmissions only to see the broadcasters wither away just as things become fully implemented.

One of the main ways that the use of OTA spectrum can be made more efficient (which is what the point of all this is) is multicasting, something that is only possible because of the "HD standard" (as you referred to it) that was defined.

One thought -- there is a big push to spread real broadband IP across the nation. The final service is supposed to be cheap or free and very inclusive. That might just end the need for OTA.

It seems unlike that generally stingy, self-centered American taxpayers would spring for "real broadband IP" that is truly "across the nation", at least not in my lifetime. So while broadband deployment might reduce the need for OTA, it won't "end" it.

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#77 OFFLINE   FogCutter

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 12:48 PM

It seems unlike that generally stingy, self-centered American taxpayers would spring for "real broadband IP" that is truly "across the nation", at least not in my lifetime. So while broadband deployment might reduce the need for OTA, it won't "end" it.


But it isn't a big leap from universal wireless IP to OTA -- the end user need not even be aware of the difference beyond the converter box.

I've seen that they are talking using the UHF spectrum and even the existing towers -- that would certainly lower the start up costs, and who knows, it could even spin enough revenue to the local stations to keep them on the air a while longer.

Of course I thought that powerline IP connection was really cool, and that never took off. Everybody is already wired save for the end of the roaders and the Amish.

#78 OFFLINE   bicker1

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Posted 15 April 2010 - 12:57 PM

It isn't the matter of the leap, itself, technically, but rather the coinage necessary to bring it about. There are simply too many other ways people would rather use their money rather than pushing their way up this hill. You outlined ways that they could "lower" the costs, but to make this a reality, including the guy I know who lives midway between San Francisco CA and Portland OR, where even OTA is difficult (but not impossible), you cannot eliminate the costs, and that's going to prevent this from being available to everyone for the foreseeable future.

#79 OFFLINE   cousinofjah

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Posted 22 April 2010 - 01:38 PM

If they get rid of OTA, what are people going to do about local news? Find out about local parking bans when it snows, if school is canceled or gets out early, if certain streets are closed. What the weather is going to be (Not that you can actually rely on that,I know lol). What if there's some sort of emergency (I notice they still broadcast that Emergency Alert thing)?

radio? until that goes all digital :)
Myopic Direc Lo Def Warrior (D12-300 x3, R16-300 x1)

#80 OFFLINE   Paul Secic

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Posted 27 April 2010 - 12:38 PM

The simple fact is that the broadcast TV business model is not sustainable. Most people watch syndicated programs or network shows and only 30% of the population watch locally produced shows. An most of that group is 50+. Another decade and the FCC won't have to shut down any TV channels, they will simply go out of business.

Network and syndicated programs can be distributed via satellite or cable directly to the viewer. The broadcaster just gets in the way with local commercial spots that the networks would just as soon sell themselves.

One reason it survives at all is the built in protection of broadcasters by politicians who trade their congressional vote for cheap access to constituents. But once they find a more effective way to hoodwink the local voter, the TV access won't be so important. Withing the next decade we'll see congress providing subsidies to broadcasters to stay powered up for localism, meaning access to the voting public.

It would be cheaper to provide every household with cable access or a dish and be done with the spectrum hogs. This is settled science, so let's just move on.


I guess I'm an odd ball because I don't watch network television now.

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#81 OFFLINE   billsharpe

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Posted 11 June 2010 - 03:00 PM

I don't expect to see OTA digital disappear anytime soon. If we're talking twenty years out, maybe so.

Look how long it took the government to finally get rid of the analog stations.

I've got both OTA and DirecTV.
Bill

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