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How to Upgrade / Copy DirecTV HD on a Mac


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#1 OFFLINE   rlinsurf

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 05:46 PM

This is a tutorial for how to remove your tiny old DTV HDDVR's HD and replace it with a lovely big new one, while copying over all your old programs and schedules from the old drive to the new drive, and do it all from your Intel Mac Pro.

The reason you have to do this from a Mac Pro specifically is because you'll need a machine with several HD bays to accomplish this. Sorry all you iMac fans :nono:

1. Preparation. Download the ubuntu install CD from here. Make sure to download the latest 32-bit .iso.

2. Open Disk Utility and click the Burn button. Don't select the .iso from the list below, or use any other method then clicking burn first. From the next dialog, select the ubuntu .iso, and burn.

3. Read the following tutorial about creating a Bootcamp partition to hold your new ubuntu installation. I'll reprint it here for convenience:

1. Download and install Boot Camp. You can get it from this link.

2. Run Boot Camp Assistant, which should appear in your Utilities Folder after the installation. Divide your Hard Drive into two parts, giving your "Windows XP" partition at least as much space as your Linux distro needs. Push the Partition button.

3. Since you won't be installing Windows, you don't need to push the "Start Installation" button. Instead, make sure your Linux install disc is in the drive and push the "Restart Mac OS X" button.

4. When you hear the Mac Booting sound (the "system bell"), hold down the alt (option) key until you see a booting menu. Click on the CD icon that says "Windows." You will boot up in your Linux install. (If the mouse doesn't work for this step, use the arrow keys to select the proper icon and hit return)

5. Run the installation as you normally would.

6. When you get to the partition manager, choose to do it manually. Find the "fat32" partition and delete it. This will be converted to free space. (EDITOR'S NOTE: Make sure that the fat32 partition you are deleting is the one you just created, for example, if you have more than bootcamp partition, say in a triple boot scenario. A good way to do this is to check that the size of the partition you're deleting is the same as the one you just created in Bootcamp).

7. Create two new partitions out of the free space: One should be about 600 MB and formatted as "swap" and the other one should take up the rest of your free space, formatted as "ext3" and assigned either "/" or "root". If you get an error message that you need a boot partition or a bootloader or something like that, ignore it, you already have it in the form of Boot Camp.


*This is key: At this point, Chris makes a serious error. From Partition Manager, you must click on Advanced, and choose the partition where you want grub installed. It must be your ext3 partition. If you don't, the installer will place grub on the default volume -- your Mac startup drive! This will mean that although all your data will still be there, you wont be able to boot from your startup drive without backing up / erasing it first.

Finish the installation and remove the install disc.

8. To boot into Linux, hold down the alt/option key at the system bell sound until you see two hard drive icons. One will say "Macintosh HD" and the other will say "Windows." Select the "Windows" icon and that's it!

9. (Optional) Drop Apple a line about how you would like that icon to say "Linux" instead of "Windows."



4. Make sure you are hard-wired to the internet. Getting ubuntu to recognize my airport card turned out to be nigh on impossible, and you can't go any further without having ubuntu connected.

5. In ubuntu, go to Applications-->Accessories-->Terminal. Type in the following command:

sudo apt-get update

This should download the source.list of all available packages. If you find it hasn't, try sudo apt-get upgrade as well.

6. Type the following command:
apt-get install libncurses5-dev

7. Follow this tutorial to install xfs tools.

This tutorial unfortunately also has errors. You may get several fatal errors when you try to do each make. If terminal reports you're missing something, just do

apt-get install whatever_the_missing_file_is
Here's one I found. After installing xfsprogs, type the following commands:

#cd ~/xfsprogs
#make install-dev

Then proceed with the tutorial.

8. Shutdown your Mac. Open the tower by using the latch at the back, and remove the main cover. Locate the bay where your startup drive is located. Remove the drive, and place it in either the 3rd or 4th bay. If your startup drive also contains your ubuntu volume, still move it to either bay 3 or 4.

9. Follow this link for clambert's great illustrated tutorial for the rest of the steps to switch drives in your DTV unit.

EDITED: Well, looks like I made a grand error in writing this tutorial, which was, that the whole thing is meant to bypass the need for gParted, since some newer Macs can't be booted from the gParted CD, and lo and behold, clamberts' tutorial states you need to use gParted to check that your new drive is /dev/sba and the old drive is /dev/sba. Obviously, if you need to use gParted to check your drives, that defeats the whole purpose of this post.

But don't worry, you don't need gParted. If you place your new drive in Bay 1 of your Mac Pro, it will be in Sata Port 0 or /dev/sda and if you place the old drive in Bay 2 of your Mac Pro, it will be Sata Port 1, or /dev/sdb.

If you're really paranoid and need to check it anyway, you can boot from your Ubuntu Install cd, and check the partitions before proceeding. Boot back into your desktop version of Ubuntu, open Terminal, and proceed with clambert's tutorial from Step 10-->Sub-Step 6.

CONTINUED...

I should add though, that in my case, I have an HR-21, and that was even simpler than in clambert's walkthrough. For an HR-21, you just need to unscrew the three torx 10 screws at the back, 2 on the sides, and remove the case. Then carefully unplug the sata data cable and the sata power cable from the drive. Then unscrew the 4 Phillips head screws securing the drive bay to the case.

Then, you can either a) carefully lift the drive without detaching the fan cable from the motherboard and unscrew the 6 Phillips head screws holding the drive to the drive bay, and remove the drive from the bay, or B) detach the fan cable from the motherboard and then remove the screws.

To put the new drive in, just reverse the procedure. It's just about as easy as replacing the drive in any PC.

Here's one dumb thing I did. Watch very carefully for the sata power cable connection where it attaches to the motherboard. It can apparently come loose very easily, and then you'll get a report from the unit saying the drive isn't formatted correctly. This is not so. It isn't the format, but the fact that your drive has no power. If you do loosen it, don't fret. Just carefully (again) ease and snap it back firmly into place, and all will be well again.

You should now have your great big new drive installed and running, with all your previously recorded shows preserved. In my case, I had 5% remaining on my old drive. Now, with a brand new 2 TB drive in there -- well, 89% :icon_hroc

Anyway, good luck to any of you Mac folks out there trying to do this PC-less. I have heard from some folks that you can in fact just boot from a GParted Live CD and accomplish the same thing, but I could never get this to happen on my Mac. Hence this workaround.

Oh, and BTW, ubuntu really is kind of a kick if you're a geek :righton:

Edited by rlinsurf, 26 November 2011 - 01:37 PM.


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#2 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 26 January 2010 - 07:01 PM

Poor mac lovers ... so much pain to make DVR's drive copy; would be easy to ask your relative or friends to make it on any PC with two SATA ports ;)

#3 OFFLINE   CCarncross

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Posted 27 January 2010 - 07:14 AM

*EDIT*

Step 1: Borrow a PC from a friend and do it using the tried and true instructions already out there!

:lol:

#4 OFFLINE   Stork

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:01 PM

rlinsurf, Can I do this with a MBP?

My MBP has USB and FW 400 & 800 connectors. I've also got Ubuntu 9.04 running with VMware's Fusion. I have two external hard drive cases for SATA drives with FW interfaces.

TIA.

#5 OFFLINE   Stork

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:07 PM

rlinsurf, et al,

In order to send you a PM, I must have 5 posts. So, pardon the Posts below.

#6 OFFLINE   Stork

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:08 PM

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#7 OFFLINE   Stork

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:09 PM

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#8 OFFLINE   Stork

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:09 PM

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#9 OFFLINE   P Smith

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Posted 04 April 2010 - 01:35 PM

Who will clean the mess after you ? :(

#10 OFFLINE   ntrance

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Posted 17 April 2010 - 05:25 PM

I don't have a Mac, but wouldn't it be easier to use rEFIt to boot the GParted Live CD?
http://refit.sourceforge.net/

It seems like you could even choose not to modify your system if you:
1. Boot rEFIt from CD, then boot GParted Live on USB.
2. Install rEFIt on a USB stick boot from that, then boot your GParted Live CD.

It can't confirm the above two methods are possible but they sure seem likely to be. And booting GParted Live definitely seems possible if you are fine with installing rEFIt on your system.

#11 OFFLINE   whackit

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 02:26 PM

You can just boot the gparted live cd directly on any mac that has an intel processor. Just burn the ISO using disk utility. Reboot and hold down option, select the CD to boot from. The directions are exactly the same as on a windows box. Note that on my 09 mac pro the earlier versions of gparted booted and the most recent ones did not.

#12 OFFLINE   rlinsurf

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Posted 10 July 2010 - 03:48 PM

You can just boot the gparted live cd directly on any mac that has an intel processor. Just burn the ISO using disk utility. Reboot and hold down option, select the CD to boot from. The directions are exactly the same as on a windows box. Note that on my 09 mac pro the earlier versions of gparted booted and the most recent ones did not.


Right, that's the problem. It works on older machines I guess. I couldn't get it to work on mine.

I also tried contacting the authors and they couldn't be bothered fixing what appears to be a fairly minor issue. Maybe if they heard from a bunch of us, they'd fix it. That would make this whole thing a heckuva lot easier.

Edited by rlinsurf, 10 July 2010 - 03:58 PM.





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