Jump to content


Welcome to DBSTalk


Sign In 

Create Account
Welcome to DBSTalk. Our community covers all aspects of video delivery solutions including: Direct Broadcast Satellite (DBS), Cable Television, and Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). We also have forums to discuss popular television programs, home theater equipment, and internet streaming service providers. Members of our community include experts who can help you solve technical problems, industry professionals, company representatives, and novices who are here to learn.

Like most online communities you must register to view or post in our community. Sign-up is a free and simple process that requires minimal information. Be a part of our community by signing in or creating an account. The Digital Bit Stream starts here!
  • Reply to existing topics or start a discussion of your own
  • Subscribe to topics and forums and get email updates
  • Send private personal messages (PM) to other forum members
  • Customize your profile page and make new friends
 
Guest Message by DevFuse

Photo

DIRECTV Satellite Discussion D-14 @99W


  • Please log in to reply
2977 replies to this topic

#1076 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 04 December 2013 - 03:11 PM

And i bet even if d10 fell out of the sky today nothing would get taken off the air.

Yeah ...

 

Except maybe for some HD PPV channels I guess;

 

As a reminder from back in 2011 when DIRECTV first reported D10's problem in SEC filings;

 

DirecTV said in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) that its DirecTV 10 satellite experienced problems with its propulsion system in the third quarter of 2011.

The company said that "During the third quarter of 2011, the propulsion system used to maintain DirecTV U.S.' D10 satellite's position in orbit temporarily ceased to function. If the propulsion system were to permanently fail, we would be required to de-orbit the satellite and record an impairment charge for its remaining book value, which was approximately $274 million at 30 September 2011. DirecTV U.S. currently has sufficient backup capacity to continue broadcasting most of the channels broadcast from this satellite; however, we would lose some of our HD pay-per-view channels if this satellite has to be de-orbited before additional capacity becomes available. We do not believe the loss of such channels would materially affect our results of operations or financial position."

 

 

And I admit to finding this quite surprising as I would have thought the total loss of linear channel capacity provided by all 14 CONUS transponders comprising 103cb would be very tough to absorb completely by the other birds without D14's addition.

 

Guess not ....  


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


...Ads Help To Support This Site...

#1077 OFFLINE   slice1900

slice1900

    AllStar

  • Registered
  • 4,005 posts
  • LocationIowa
Joined: Feb 14, 2013

Posted 04 December 2013 - 03:29 PM

It's good to see SpaceX enter the commercial launch market but it'll be awhile before they are in a position to make a strong bid for most Directv launches. The F9 has a maximum published payload of about 4,850 kg to a standard GTO. The last 3 Directv satellites massed over 6,000 kg at launch. I don't have a reference handy, but I think the SSL 1300 bus vehicles planned for D14 and 15 will be in the same general class, give or take. And in any case, SpaceX is booked for the next several years anyway. 

Once F9 Heavy flies, it'll have the payload capability (and a lot more, to boot) but cost may well be prohibitive. The "regular" F9 is undersized for Directv's fleet, but F9H is well over-sized. :shrug:

 

 

Can't launch vehicles lift more than one satellite into orbit at once? Being too small for Directv's satellites is a show stopper, and I hadn't realized that was the case with the Falcon 9. Being too big, on the other hand, seems like less of a problem, assuming the remaining capacity of the Falcon Heavy can be filled - which maybe I shouldn't assume.

 

According to Wikipedia, the Falcon Heavy (they renamed it from the Falcon 9 Heavy) is capable of lifting 21,000 kg to geostationary transfer orbit, at a cost per launch of $77 - $135 million, versus $56 million for Falcon 9 with a lift capacity of just under 5000 kg. If Directv was taking up a third of the payload of the Falcon Heavy, that would be as little as $25 - $45 million. Any idea how that compares to what they're paying now?

 

The fact SpaceX is booked up for a few years doesn't seem to be too much of a problem, considering that there haven't been any announcements for satellites beyond D15. Given that D14 was announced in June 2010 and will be launched almost four years later, if they announced D16 today they would be looking at a launch in 2016 or more likely 2017. According to the launch manifest on SpaceX's site, there is one Falcon Heavy launch currently scheduled for 2016, and one for 2017.

 

They may not choose to use SpaceX, especially if the next satellite is announced in the near future, but they should at least have the choice available to them given how long it takes from announcement to launch.


SL5, PI-6S, SA-6AL 3xSWM16, 21 H20-100, 1 H20-600, 7 H24-700/AM21


#1078 OFFLINE   longrider

longrider

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 3,524 posts
  • LocationElizabeth, CO
Joined: Apr 21, 2007

Posted 04 December 2013 - 04:13 PM

Can't launch vehicles lift more than one satellite into orbit at once? Being too small for Directv's satellites is a show stopper, and I hadn't realized that was the case with the Falcon 9. Being too big, on the other hand, seems like less of a problem, assuming the remaining capacity of the Falcon Heavy can be filled - which maybe I shouldn't assume.

 

I am not 100% sure but believe that Arianespace has done that with the Ariane5.  A payload would consist of 2 or even 3 satellites at one time


My Setup

#1079 OFFLINE   bobnielsen

bobnielsen

    Éminence grise

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 8,310 posts
  • LocationBainbridge Island, WA
Joined: Jun 29, 2006

Posted 04 December 2013 - 05:22 PM

I am not 100% sure but believe that Arianespace has done that with the Ariane5.  A payload would consist of 2 or even 3 satellites at one time

 

That has happened many times and not just with the Ariane.  There was a LEO launch last month of a Minotaur-1 carrying 29 (small) satellites.



#1080 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 04 December 2013 - 06:09 PM

Yes;

 

Thus one of the meanings of the up to three letter trailing designation of a successful launch's COSPAR number I suppose.


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1081 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 20,664 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 05 December 2013 - 09:11 AM

And I admit to finding this quite surprising as I would have thought the total loss of linear channel capacity provided by all 14 CONUS transponders comprising 103cb would be very tough to absorb completely by the other birds without D14's addition.

I believe that too little attention has been paid to the coverage of available frequencies given the current fleet and how little bandwidth is left at the appointed slots. If all that DIRECTV 10 brings in the net is a handful of PPV channels, they may be more afraid to lean on it that some seem to believe. It seems odd that losing DIRECTV 10 wouldn't have a significant impact on LIL as one Spaceway 1 has a much less spot beam capacity (I recall that it is half or less).

It isn't realistic to assume that each launch brings a big boost in usable bandwidth. Some of the previous launches have brought considerable replacement bandwidth.

Can someone here offer an accounting of what's left in DIRECTV's licenses for the Ka bandwidth in three slots (ignoring that a 101W Ka antenna isn't currently available)?

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#1082 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 05 December 2013 - 12:16 PM

I believe that too little attention has been paid to the coverage of available frequencies given the current fleet and how little bandwidth is left at the appointed slots. If all that DIRECTV 10 brings in the net is a handful of PPV channels, they may be more afraid to lean on it that some seem to believe. 

It isn't realistic to assume that each launch brings a big boost in usable bandwidth. Some of the previous launches have brought considerable replacement bandwidth. ...

 

Well D10 is contributing a lot more than just "a handful of PPVs" at the moment.

 

However, looking at the numbers in the latest transponder maps release, I guess I can understand DIRECTV's claim to have the reserve capacity in case of D10's eventual failure. As it's present share of carried channels is by far the lowest of the three "D" type birds and also has the highest proportion of full time linear HD channels to PPV ones of the three.

 

D10 - 48 linear HD broadcast channels including 14 HD PPV

 

D11 -  78 linear HD broadcast channels including 21 HD PPV

 

D12 - 87 linear HD broadcast channels including 6 HD PPV. Plus 7 additional MPEG-4 SD channels.

 

So if we lost D10 today for instance, all DIRECTV would have to do is drop some or all of the 14 HD PPV channels on it and move the remaining 34 linear HD channels over to D11, and 12.

 

Possibly by going to a higher channel loading on their CONUS transponders than the customary 5-per. they normally use.

 

... It seems odd that losing DIRECTV 10 wouldn't have a significant impact on LIL as one Spaceway 1 has a much less spot beam capacity (I recall that it is half or less).

 

That shouldn't be any problem since the spotbeam payload on D12 is identical to D10's so may completely take over for it, if it hasn't happened already.

 

... Can someone here offer an accounting of what's left in DIRECTV's licenses for the Ka bandwidth in three slots (ignoring that a 101W Ka antenna isn't currently available)?

 

AFAIK, their Ka license authorizes the same two 500 MHz wide bands (or 1000 MHz aggregate) at 99, 101, and 103.


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1083 OFFLINE   LameLefty

LameLefty

    I used to be a rocket scientist

  • Registered
  • 12,181 posts
  • LocationMiddle Tennessee
Joined: Sep 28, 2006

Posted 05 December 2013 - 12:30 PM

Can't launch vehicles lift more than one satellite into orbit at once? Being too small for Directv's satellites is a show stopper, and I hadn't realized that was the case with the Falcon 9. Being too big, on the other hand, seems like less of a problem, assuming the remaining capacity of the Falcon Heavy can be filled - which maybe I shouldn't assume.

 

According to Wikipedia, the Falcon Heavy (they renamed it from the Falcon 9 Heavy) is capable of lifting 21,000 kg to geostationary transfer orbit, at a cost per launch of $77 - $135 million, versus $56 million for Falcon 9 with a lift capacity of just under 5000 kg. If Directv was taking up a third of the payload of the Falcon Heavy, that would be as little as $25 - $45 million. Any idea how that compares to what they're paying now?

 

The fact SpaceX is booked up for a few years doesn't seem to be too much of a problem, considering that there haven't been any announcements for satellites beyond D15. Given that D14 was announced in June 2010 and will be launched almost four years later, if they announced D16 today they would be looking at a launch in 2016 or more likely 2017. According to the launch manifest on SpaceX's site, there is one Falcon Heavy launch currently scheduled for 2016, and one for 2017.

 

They may not choose to use SpaceX, especially if the next satellite is announced in the near future, but they should at least have the choice available to them given how long it takes from announcement to launch.

 

 

I am not 100% sure but believe that Arianespace has done that with the Ariane5.  A payload would consist of 2 or even 3 satellites at one time

 

 

That has happened many times and not just with the Ariane.  There was a LEO launch last month of a Minotaur-1 carrying 29 (small) satellites.

 

There are several issues related to multiple-vehicle deliveries to GTO.  First, all of the multiple payloads have to be delivered to the launch site in fairly close time-proximity to one another; no one wants to have a multi-hundred million dollar payload just sitting around in a clean room (not to mention that most launch locations don't have an excess of clean room space for storage anyway).

 

Second, all three payloads have to be fueled and processed with operating fluids, batteries, etc. prior to integration with the launch vehicle. This takes time and is generally considered fairly hazardous if the satellite has hypergolic fluids onboard for attitude control (most do). So that has to be done in a hazmat facility; most launch operations don't have multiple hypergolic loading sites and crews to process multiple payloads in parallel. Doing them serially takes longer and puts more strain on ground crews to sustain that level of intensity in the hazmat ops. Then the fueled and ready spacecraft have to be physically and electrically mated to their payload adapter, and then the entire cluster of payloads encapsulated for launch inside the fairing.  Look at the Arianespace site for a cutaway view of how Ariane 5 does it; it's not terribly simple. I don't think SpaceX has even shown concept art or advertised their intentions of developing this capability for F9H at all. Their target market for this vehicle is PROBABLY single large LEO payloads for the USAF and NSA, and large-payload GTO missions, using the excess delta-v for reusability operations if those prove to be viable and economically advantageous.

 

And third, cost. The prices quoted by SpaceX are taken with a large grain of salt by people who know the GTO launch business. They're akin to the barebones prices you see advertised on newspaper sales flyers; that price typically wouldn't even include a rocket payload adapter, or pay for the very expensive ground processing and integration ops.  Now even so, there is no doubt SpaceX promises lower prices than competitors for the payloads it can fly. The real question will be if they can maintain regularly-scheduled missions, one after another, for several years on end, and still keep their prices as low as promised. IF they do that, the entire launch industry will be turned upside down. One can hope.

 

Anyway, back to the main topic - multiple payload operations for GTO missions has been a staple for Ariansepace but the operational and timing issues have proven to be big enough to lead to the development of Ariane 6, a smaller booster for single GTO missions, which is still a ways away. So really, for now anyway, SpaceX is off the radar for typical CONUS Directv payloads.  F9H may be marketed for that purpose in the future, but that vehicle hasn't even flown yet. Time will tell.


"Human sacrifice, dogs and cats living together... mass hysteria!"
Directv since 1997
Will Work for Beer


#1084 OFFLINE   slice1900

slice1900

    AllStar

  • Registered
  • 4,005 posts
  • LocationIowa
Joined: Feb 14, 2013

Posted 05 December 2013 - 01:58 PM

Thanks for that really good explanation, LameLefty! I guess the one benefit SpaceX will have even if Directv never uses them is that whatever it launches frees up capacity for everyone else.


SL5, PI-6S, SA-6AL 3xSWM16, 21 H20-100, 1 H20-600, 7 H24-700/AM21


#1085 OFFLINE   studechip

studechip

    Godfather

  • Registered
  • 1,158 posts
Joined: Apr 16, 2012

Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:03 PM

Well D10 is contributing a lot more than just "a handful of PPVs" at the moment.

 

However, looking at the numbers in the latest transponder maps release, I guess I can understand DIRECTV's claim to have the reserve capacity in case of D10's eventual failure. As it's present share of carried channels is by far the lowest of the three "D" type birds and also has the highest proportion of full time linear HD channels to PPV ones of the three.

 

D10 - 48 linear HD broadcast channels including 14 HD PPV

 

D11 -  78 linear HD broadcast channels including 21 HD PPV

 

D12 - 87 linear HD broadcast channels including 6 HD PPV. Plus 7 additional MPEG-4 SD channels.

 

So if we lost D10 today for instance, all DIRECTV would have to do is drop some or all of the 14 HD PPV channels on it and move the remaining 34 linear HD channels over to D11, and 12.

 

Possibly by going to a higher channel loading on their CONUS transponders than the customary 5-per. they normally use.

 

That shouldn't be any problem since the spotbeam payload on D12 is identical to D10's so may completely take over for it, if it hasn't happened already.

 

AFAIK, their Ka license authorizes the same two 500 MHz wide bands (or 1000 MHz aggregate) at 99, 101, and 103.

Many have six.



#1086 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 05 December 2013 - 04:44 PM

Many have six.

I know;

 

But I assume the "norm" is still five. :)


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1087 OFFLINE   georule

georule

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 1,601 posts
Joined: Mar 31, 2010

Posted 05 December 2013 - 05:03 PM

Just because they haven't rolled out many new channels lately doesn't necessarily mean the back-end upgrades haven't continued (assuming we're correct about the new encoders).  If they have a budget, and staff who are on a roll doing that kind of work, why not keep doing it?


LR(non-CE): HR44, Mits 65C9; Office/FR (CE): HR22-100 + AM21, Mits 60737 + Mits 3DA1 3D adapter. Spare bedroom (non-CE), HR23. Genie WHDVR, wireless networking (yay!)

#1088 OFFLINE   inkahauts

inkahauts

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 17,547 posts
Joined: Nov 13, 2006

Posted 05 December 2013 - 05:58 PM

Well D10 is contributing a lot more than just "a handful of PPVs" at the moment.

However, looking at the numbers in the latest transponder maps release, I guess I can understand DIRECTV's claim to have the reserve capacity in case of D10's eventual failure. As it's present share of carried channels is by far the lowest of the three "D" type birds and also has the highest proportion of full time linear HD channels to PPV ones of the three.

D10 - 48 linear HD broadcast channels including 14 HD PPV

D11 - 78 linear HD broadcast channels including 21 HD PPV

D12 - 87 linear HD broadcast channels including 6 HD PPV. Plus 7 additional MPEG-4 SD channels.

So if we lost D10 today for instance, all DIRECTV would have to do is drop some or all of the 14 HD PPV channels on it and move the remaining 34 linear HD channels over to D11, and 12.

Possibly by going to a higher channel loading on their CONUS transponders than the customary 5-per. they normally use.

That shouldn't be any problem since the spotbeam payload on D12 is identical to D10's so may completely take over for it, if it hasn't happened already.

AFAIK, their Ka license authorizes the same two 500 MHz wide bands (or 1000 MHz aggregate) at 99, 101, and 103.


I am pretty sure that DIRECTV could lose any one sat in their entire fleet an not really lose much.

Also we know that all the satelites have spare unused transponders on then that they could light up if a different sat died and I'm guessing they could use that in the freq that is currently used by whatever say died. Just a thought.


Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk

#1089 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 06 December 2013 - 02:28 AM

I am pretty sure that DIRECTV could lose any one sat in their entire fleet an not really lose much.

 

I'd agree with this all things being equal;

 

That is to say if D10 were fully healthy like 11, and 12.

 

But with D10 having problems, I can't really say DIRECTV wouldn't lose a lot if D11 or 12 were to be lost.   
 

... Also we know that all the satelites have spare unused transponders on then that they could light up if a different sat died and I'm guessing they could use that in the freq that is currently used by whatever say died. Just a thought.


Sent from my iPhone using DBSTalk

 

Possibly;

 

Though admittedly I'm not aware of any such capability nor ever read of such in any of the LOA narratives for DIRECTV's satellites of spare transponders ability to operate on a different band than the ones they're intended to act as spares for.

 

So then AFAIK, the loss of D10 would mean the loss of all 14 B-band (downlink 18.3-18.8 GHz) CONUS transponders of 103cb. 


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1090 OFFLINE   slice1900

slice1900

    AllStar

  • Registered
  • 4,005 posts
  • LocationIowa
Joined: Feb 14, 2013

Posted 06 December 2013 - 03:21 AM

Well, assuming D15 goes to 103, whatever risk there is of losing 103cb due to problems with D10 is only felt for another year or so. If D15 has the ability to broadcast Ka lo - hopefully it does! I'm not sure if its exact capabilities have been made public yet.

 

Like you, I'm curious about exactly how much frequency reconfigurability these satellites have, if any. I think it is probably safe to assume a satellite designed to broadcast Ku can't be reconfigured for Ka, and vice versa. But could a Ka hi sat do Ka lo, 1.4 GHz lower? Could a Ka lo sat do RDBS, only 1 GHz lower? What about the more flexible Spaceway sats? Does their programmability extend into the frequency range they're broadcasting, or is that fixed and the flexibility only pertains to what is broadcast within that fixed range?

 

My 'gut feeling' is that the frequencies are probably fixed in the design because it would lead to more efficient transmission in the intended range than a more flexible transmitter would allow, and/or a more flexible transmitter would be significantly more expensive, but I truly have no idea. This is getting into all those nasty RF details like antennas and transmitters about which I'm woefully ignorant :)


Edited by slice1900, 06 December 2013 - 03:22 AM.

SL5, PI-6S, SA-6AL 3xSWM16, 21 H20-100, 1 H20-600, 7 H24-700/AM21


#1091 OFFLINE   Diana C

Diana C

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 2,092 posts
  • LocationNew Jersey
Joined: Mar 30, 2007

Posted 06 December 2013 - 09:26 AM

Transponders are basically refractive devices, they are designed to take an incoming frequency and translate the signal a specific number of hertz up or down for retransmission. The acceptable "in" frequency range is determined by many factors, including the receive antenna array, the design of the additional circuitry on board, as well as the transponder itself. So, if the uplink and downlink delta is the same, a transponder can be used on particular frequency in the design range. A Ku transponder can't be reconfigured for Ka, but a Ka hi could be used for Ka low, and vice versa. IIRC, the uplink/downlink pairing is quite different for RDBS, so I doubt Ka transponders can be stretched that far. If they could, they could have tested RDBS without launching a satellite with specific RDBS transponders.

Dish Network Customer from 9/1998-11/2001
DirecTV Customer 10/2001 - 7/2014

FiOS TV/TiVo Customer since 6/2014
Moderator, DBSDish.com 1999-2000
Co-Founder and Administrator, DBSForums.com 2000-2006

Current setup:
DirecTV: HR34-700 (1TB) / HR24-100 (1TB) / HR24-500 (1TB) / HR21-700 (320GB) / HR21-100 (1TB) / 2 H25s / C41-500 / SWiM16 / Nomad / CCK

FiOS: 2 Tivo Roamio Pros (6 TB total) / 5 Tivo Minis attached via MOCA


#1092 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 06 December 2013 - 11:23 AM

Transponders are basically refractive devices, they are designed to take an incoming frequency and translate the signal a specific number of hertz up or down for retransmission. The acceptable "in" frequency range is determined by many factors, including the receive antenna array, the design of the additional circuitry on board, as well as the transponder itself. So, if the uplink and downlink delta is the same, a transponder can be used on particular frequency in the design range. A Ku transponder can't be reconfigured for Ka, but a Ka hi could be used for Ka low, and vice versa. IIRC, the uplink/downlink pairing is quite different for RDBS, so I doubt Ka transponders can be stretched that far. If they could, they could have tested RDBS without launching a satellite with specific RDBS transponders.

It's just that I would think that any RF transmitter potentially placed on the air would have to be licensed by the FCC and released as a public notification;

 

So there should be some mention of this capability in the various FCC applications DIRECTV submits for authorization if it exist. Yet there is no specification of this in D12's (in this case) paperwork of an ability to operate any of it's active or spare CONUS transponders on the Ka B band.

 

Only it's LiL payload is licensed for it (i.e. tps. 15-24 of 103(s) )


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1093 OFFLINE   Diana C

Diana C

    Hall Of Fame

  • DBSTalk Club
  • 2,092 posts
  • LocationNew Jersey
Joined: Mar 30, 2007

Posted 06 December 2013 - 01:12 PM

Oh, absolutely...they have to have a license before they can actually use the frequency.  If a satellite was only licensed to operate in Ka Hi, and the owner wants to operate it in Ka Lo, they would have to get the license amended.

 

I'm assuming that the Ka transponders are all the same design, whether destined for "Hi' or "Lo" band use.  However, if the transponders themselves are different (that is, they can't accept the opposite band's input frequency and/or generate the output frequency) because the band is too wide for a single design, then the transponders are only "agile" across the given band (Ka Hi vs. Ka Lo).

 

But any transponder (Ku, Ka Hi or Ka Lo) can be used on any "channel" within the band.


Dish Network Customer from 9/1998-11/2001
DirecTV Customer 10/2001 - 7/2014

FiOS TV/TiVo Customer since 6/2014
Moderator, DBSDish.com 1999-2000
Co-Founder and Administrator, DBSForums.com 2000-2006

Current setup:
DirecTV: HR34-700 (1TB) / HR24-100 (1TB) / HR24-500 (1TB) / HR21-700 (320GB) / HR21-100 (1TB) / 2 H25s / C41-500 / SWiM16 / Nomad / CCK

FiOS: 2 Tivo Roamio Pros (6 TB total) / 5 Tivo Minis attached via MOCA


#1094 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 20,664 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:12 AM

I am pretty sure that DIRECTV could lose any one sat in their entire fleet an not really lose much.

Without suggesting any manner of failure, there seems to be an awful lot riding on DIRECTV 8.

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#1095 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 20,664 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 07 December 2013 - 11:14 AM

Well, assuming D15 goes to 103, whatever risk there is of losing 103cb due to problems with D10 is only felt for another year or so. If D15 has the ability to broadcast Ka lo - hopefully it does! I'm not sure if its exact capabilities have been made public yet.

Several seem to take for granted that DIRECTV 15 is obviously bound for 103W. As I pointed out above, the CONUS situation at 101W is perhaps the least well backed up. After all, DIRECTV 15 was announced as a spare (almost certainly because DIRECTV 12 went directly into service). It doesn't appear to be set up to fully replace any one satellite but is rather set up to provide partial backup capacity at any slot (99W-119W):

30 Ku transponders (presumably 24MHz wide)
24 Ka transponders (presumably 36MHz wide)
18 RDBS transponders (who cares?)

As we're still some interval away from launch of DIRECTV 15, I suppose things could change and, like DIRECTV 12, it could be reconfigured to cover a specific failure but at this point, I'm not seeing it.

DIRECTV 9S is configured to back up DIRECTV 4S or DIRECTV 7S so the Ku spot beam situation should be covered (although DIRECTV 4S is getting up there in years).

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#1096 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 20,664 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 07 December 2013 - 11:17 AM

Well D10 is contributing a lot more than just "a handful of PPVs" at the moment.

Nonetheless, absent DIRECTV 10, that's all they claimed they would lose.

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#1097 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 07 December 2013 - 11:37 AM

Nonetheless, absent DIRECTV 10, that's all they claimed they would lose.

But that statement doesn't mean D10 is only contributing "a few PPVs" at present;

 

Only that there is enough reserve capacity on the other birds (presumably D11 and 12) to absorb all of D10's traffic in the event of it's complete failure except for some PPV channels it is carrying.


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1098 OFFLINE   harsh

harsh

    Beware the Attack Basset

  • Registered
  • 20,664 posts
  • LocationSalem, OR
Joined: Jun 14, 2003

Posted 07 December 2013 - 12:03 PM

But that statement doesn't mean D10 is only contributing "a few PPVs" at present;

Which is why I qualified my statement with "in the net".

Too often we enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. -- JFK


#1099 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 07 December 2013 - 12:04 PM

 

... 18 RDBS transponders (who cares?)

 

They're 36 MHz wide, and what do you mean "who cares?"

 

We do! (or should), as in "DIRECTV subscribers" :)

 

As that's the standard bandwidth used by DIRECTV needed for HD programming.
 

As we're still some interval away from launch of DIRECTV 15, I suppose things could change and, like DIRECTV 12, it could be reconfigured to cover a specific failure but at this point, I'm not seeing it.

 

Huh? :confused: 

 

What specific re-configuration capability are you referring to which D12 has which you can't see D15 as having?
 

... DIRECTV 9S is configured to back up DIRECTV 4S or DIRECTV 7S so the Ku spot beam situation should be covered (although DIRECTV 4S is getting up there in years).

 

 

Actually harsh it appears the other way around with the older D4S largely backing up D9S nowadays.

 

For instance all 10 even numbered CONUS transponders from 101 are coming from D9S, not D4S' CONUS payload which has been shutdown for some time now.

 

At best D4S is relegated to spotbeam duty only, either in whole or sharing the duties with D9S' spotbeam payload (more likely the later case). 


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95


#1100 OFFLINE   HoTat2

HoTat2

    Hall Of Fame

  • Registered
  • 5,690 posts
  • LocationLos Angeles, CA.
Joined: Nov 16, 2005

Posted 07 December 2013 - 12:14 PM

Which is why I qualified my statement with "in the net".

Got you;

 

I thought you meant "network" by "net" in that post.

 

And yes, DIRECTV is apparently not leaning heavily on D10 these days in comparison to D11 and 12 as the channel numbers I posted earlier suggest, obviously due to its problematic status. 


DIRECTV sub. since Sep. of '95





Protected By... spam firewall...And...