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Guest Message by DevFuse

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D* pq vesus C* pq


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28 replies to this topic

#21 OFFLINE   CCarncross

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 12:54 PM

Well...

Yes, OTA has the *potential* to use up to 19Mb/s for their MPEG2 feed, and so everyone makes the assumption that they do, but in reality, a station with no subchannels typically runs their feed at around 14Mb/s. With subchannels, that feed could be *much* less.

On the other hand, a TV provider like DirecTV or Comcast (or Verizon or AT&T, etc.) could be pulling in a feed over fiber before that final stage of compression, and so could be delivering a higher-quality feed than what goes out OTA. True, most OTA stations are actually picked up OTA, recompressed using MPEG4 (with very little additional loss in most cases), and sent out, but some feeds are fiber and are very high quality.


Hence the minor exceptions clause......Personally I have yet to see a lil HD feed from D* that was better than that same station OTA.

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#22 OFFLINE   convem24

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Posted 06 August 2010 - 12:55 PM

Comcast locally (Seattle) has gone to almost all digital. I think channels 2-29 are still simulcast analog/digital (but maybe not), all the rest are digital only.

As others have noted, cable pq varies from market to market and company to company. There is no "one size fits all" with regard to cable pq. I left Comcast and got DirecTV due to picture quality issues. At that time, DirecTV was significantly better. Can't say that is still true, as I don't have the opportunity to do a valid comparison.


Carl, I am staying with family near Puyallup (all digital Comcast) and their HD still looks like crap!
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#23 OFFLINE   convem24

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 12:52 AM

I have DirecTV and the picture quality is excellent. I am still able though to view some of the unscrambled Comcast channels via my TV's tuner. For now HD network channels like ABC, CBS, NBC look better in my area from Comcast than DirecTV. My understanding is that is because in some areas there is much less compression done on those channels than the rest of their cable channels. The rest I hear are pretty seriously overcompressed. Hard for me to give Comcast any positive remarks, but in this case those channels look really good.


I agree with you general sentiments. In the area I am staying with relatives, they way over compress the digital and HD signals (it looks really bad) and artifacted. I appreciate the level of service I get versus Comcast in this area.
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#24 OFFLINE   SPACEMAKER

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 07:11 AM

I had Comcast for TV and internet for several years. In my area Comcast completely sucked in every way imaginable.

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#25 OFFLINE   georule

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 07:55 AM

Hence the minor exceptions clause......Personally I have yet to see a lil HD feed from D* that was better than that same station OTA.


I asked an NBC affilliate broadcast engineer of my acquaintance about this issue once a few months back --I was told at their station the D* feed (they take a fiber feed like Comcast --Dish takes it off air) happens after the equipment that dynamically allocates bandwidth between the OTA channels. I suspect that is the common setup.

It had occurred to me that it was possible that might not be the case --that the fiber feeds might be going out before the bit-robbing equipment had done its evil deed. But nope.

#26 OFFLINE   rey_1178

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Posted 07 August 2010 - 04:37 PM

Actually with only minor exceptions, OTA should always be top of the list as far a PQ of network television....


Something is terribly wrong somewhere if OTA-HD isn't the best PQ, period. Either some adjustment is out of whack or there's cockpit error.

MPEG-4 HD on some channels via D* can come very close, but OTA-HD is king of the hill, and there are technical reasons for this to be the case.

i agree. you guys are correct. ota to first of the line. then Directv :D
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#27 OFFLINE   Sim-X

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Posted 08 August 2010 - 02:56 PM

DTV picture was worlds ahead of my crappy comcast picture. There was certainly some certain channels in my market anyway that I noticed a BIG difference. Discovery, Universal HD and USA were awful on comcast.

#28 OFFLINE   KNPKH2ster

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 10:29 AM

DTV picture was worlds ahead of my crappy comcast picture. There was certainly some certain channels in my market anyway that I noticed a BIG difference. Discovery, Universal HD and USA were awful on comcast.


You are right about that. When I had friends over last saturday for a get-together, we were watching the 2nd half of the Yankees-Red Sox game on FOX. One of my friends has Comcast while the rest have Cablevision. Since I have D*, one of my friends says that the HD on the D* look a lot better compared to the HD on Comcast in his house. As for the rest of my friends, they also noticed some difference between DirecTV and Cablevision HD PQ.

#29 OFFLINE   Kansas Zephyr

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Posted 09 August 2010 - 10:39 AM

On the other hand, a TV provider like DirecTV or Comcast (or Verizon or AT&T, etc.) could be pulling in a feed over fiber before that final stage of compression, and so could be delivering a higher-quality feed than what goes out OTA. True, most OTA stations are actually picked up OTA, recompressed using MPEG4 (with very little additional loss in most cases), and sent out, but some feeds are fiber and are very high quality.

Even the fiber feeds to the providers are only carrying that station's MPEG2 stream.

A station isn't going to spent the initial capital, nor pay more monthly for additional bandwidth, to provide a different feed to other providers.

Yes, local stations could...but they don't...it's either ATSC OTA pickup...or the same MPEG2 via fiber.

Better PQ supplied by locals to cable and sat is an interesting myth. What TV station would market, "Don't watch OTA when cable or sat has our best picture ever!"
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